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Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to ArgMeMatey

Re: How often to change smoke detector batteries

My families lives are worth more than a few lousy 9 volt batteries. Your family may not be as valuable.
That, and they ALWAYS fail in the middle of the night.
If you have an electrical outage that causes a fire, you will need that battery backup.

Since most fires are in the winter, I change them and the CO detector each fall change in time. And, I write the date on them.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
said by Jtmo:

My families lives are worth more than a few lousy 9 volt batteries. Your family may not be as valuable.
That, and they ALWAYS fail in the middle of the night.
If you have an electrical outage that causes a fire, you will need that battery backup.

Since most fires are in the winter, I change them and the CO detector each fall change in time. And, I write the date on them.

I have 8 smoke detectors in the house - one in each bedroom and one on each floor by the stairs. If all of them fail to sound, then I'm probably dead anyway.

Changing batteries twice a year IS overkill. You're doing nothing to enhance safety, and everything to fatten the pockets of battery manufacturers.

I test mine every month. They work.


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
kudos:2
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reply to Jtmo
said by Jtmo:

My families lives are worth more than a few lousy 9 volt batteries. Your family may not be as valuable.

That is commonly where it ends with emotional appeals.

For another approach, take note of the opportunity cost, especially when looked at on a macro level.

100 million households in the US
One detector per household
One dollar per replacement battery
= $100 million spent every time everybody replaces their battery.

What's not happening because we're spending $100 million on batteries?

If batteries are replaced once a year instead of twice a year, we collectively save a lot of money.

Now, not that it would ever happen, but let's say taxes were increased by $1 per household.

With that $100 million, every household gets a free battery per year (purchased at wholesale cost based on competitive supplier bid), $5 million is spent on program administration, and $45 million is made available to rewire houses where inspectors have found electrical fire hazards.

Is it now more likely there would be fewer fires? Yes.

Is it more likely that everybody has a good battery in their detector? Probably.
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