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Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to Jon

Re: What the home insecptor found...

said by Jon:

You're not allowed to use Romex in IL. Everything has to be in conduit.

I'm not disputing your statement, but I looked at Lowes for Naperville IL and they sell Romex. Can't be much demand for it... Yes, I realize people could buy it and use it out of state, but that's not very practical.

Doesn't New York (City) have similar requirements of using flexible metal conduit (and effectively no Romex) ?


Jon
Premium
join:2001-01-20
Lisle, IL

1 recommendation

Here ya go
quote:
5-1F-1: ADOPTION:

For the purposes of supplementing the provisions and regulations contained in this title, and for setting forth minimum standards for the installation of electrical wiring, the city hereby adopts by reference the standards, specifications, rules and regulations of the National Fire Protection Association as compiled and published as the national electrical code, 2005 edition (NFPA no. 70-2005) (hereinafter referred to as the NEC), and the 2006 ICC electrical code, as amended, three (3) copies of each shall be kept on file in the city clerk's office for public inspection. (Ord. 06-301, 12-19-2006, eff. 1-1-2007)

5-1F-2: AMENDMENTS:

1.Section 603, Alternative Engineered Design: Delete in its entirety.

2.Chapter 11, Means Of Appeal: Delete in its entirety. (Ord. 02-31, 2-19-2002, eff. 4-8-2002)

5-1F-3: WIRING METHODS:

The wiring methods specified in chapter 3 of the NEC will be permitted by this article, except as noted below:

1. Article 336 - Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable: Type NM, type NMC, and type NMS cables shall only be permitted to be used in the following: Temporary wiring in accordance with NEC article 590 or low voltage lighting systems less than 30 volts in accordance with NEC article 411.

2. Article 338 - Service-Entrance Cable: Type SE cables shall only be permitted to be used in temporary wiring in accordance with NEC article 590. (Ord. 06-301, 12-19-2006, eff. 1-1-2007)


I know it's old but it hasn't changed

AricBrown

join:2002-12-11
Amarillo, TX
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to Hall
said by Hall:

said by Jon:

You're not allowed to use Romex in IL. Everything has to be in conduit.

I'm not disputing your statement, but I looked at Lowes for Naperville IL and they sell Romex. Can't be much demand for it... Yes, I realize people could buy it and use it out of state, but that's not very practical.

Doesn't New York (City) have similar requirements of using flexible metal conduit (and effectively no Romex) ?

The city I live in does not allow 14 gauge wire only 12 for normal residential construction. Both lowes and home depot sell it. But I can use Romex

So just because you cant use it doesn't mean you cant buy it.


scott2020

join:2008-07-20
MO
reply to Hall
I used to live in Naperville and when I did my basement, it all had to be conduit. The entire house was that way. Seems like overkill but it did keep a group of electricians busy for a very long time.

Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5
Naperville is all conduit. There are some Illinois communities that allow Romex. I'm pretty sure Batavia is one.
--
Stopping someone from saying another person is stupid doesn't make the stupid person no longer stupid.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to scott2020
said by scott2020:

I used to live in Naperville and when I did my basement, it all had to be conduit. The entire house was that way. Seems like overkill but it did keep a group of electricians busy for a very long time.

Which is exactly what the requirement is intended to do. Romex is safe in the vast majority of the country and unsafe in a handful that have other considerations which have nothing to do with safety.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
It would be interesting if an electrical job estimator (Whizkid, do you fit that ?) would weigh in, but I'll guess that a conduit job requires almost 2x the time as a straight Romex job.


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
said by Hall:

It would be interesting if an electrical job estimator (Whizkid, do you fit that ?) would weigh in, but I'll guess that a conduit job requires almost 2x the time as a straight Romex job.

Actually I've been told the opposite. A local sparky here who does all types of work from residential to farm to commercial and industrial said that you have to factor in the savings of being able to pull multiple circuits all at one time, and the ease of load and circuit management that comes with conduit, not to mention future expandability.

He said a single large conduit run will of course replace multiple runs of romex, and all the associated stapling and drilling time that comes with it. So for him anyhow, it is faster, and he prefers it. Not sure how others look at it.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
You can pull multiple runs of Romex at the same time as well. Both use similar outlet/switch/junction boxes, so we'll call that equal as well.

Whether Romex or conduit, you have to drill holes for both scenarios. When that's done, you just pull Romex. With conduit, you have to "assemble" the runs (granted, one fitting and two screws attaches two pieces of conduit), measure and cut conduit, add in elbows and other bends, clamps, etc, etc. Then you have to pull the wiring.