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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to HunterZ

Re: [Signals] Just moved and need some advice

The tech that did the install (move in installs always require a tech as they have physically connect the house drop to the tap) should have checked the signal levels. They are also supposed to check for leakage when they do an install.

Sounds like a truck roll is needed.

Also the rural nature of your area could explain the weak signals as distance from the node/amps may be greater.



HunterZ

join:2003-07-16
Kent, WA

1 edit

said by wa2ibm:

However, since the wall is between living space and the garage, it's most likely a firewall (a real fire wall, not a network one). Any hole(s) you poke through that will have to be resealed in a fireproof manner.

That thought did occur to me, and I was wondering what I should do about it. It looks like at minimum I should use some fire-resistant caulking/seal, but should I be using some kind of conduit and/or box as well?

If anyone could provide links to specific examples hardware/materials that I ought to consider, it would be much appreciated! I'm not much of a DIYer, but I hope to enlist my wife's help as she worked in and taught university level theatre stage management, lighting and sound design

said by wa2ibm:

Might I suggest that you hang the SB6120 on the wall next to the amp and run a section of CAT5 along with the coax back to the living room and your router. That way, any splitter installed when Comcast comes to visit will be near your service entrance, and any loses to the modem will be minimized.

That's a really good idea, thanks! I'm thinking I'd connect from the drop to a 2-way splitter inside the garage, then do a short coax run (5 feet at most) from the splitter to the modem.

I'd then run ethernet from the modem to the family room to reach the router, and I would also run coax from the second leg of the splitter to the TV. This means I'd need to be able to feed both coax and ethernet through the firewall between the garage and the family room.

said by IowaCowboy:

The tech that did the install (move in installs always require a tech as they have physically connect the house drop to the tap) should have checked the signal levels. They are also supposed to check for leakage when they do an install.

There was no tech at the house. Comcast gave us the option of doing a "self install" instead of rolling a truck. Since I wanted to get the Internet up ASAP, I chose the former option. This turned out to be a potential mistake because Comcast's walled garden activation wouldn't work for me and I had to do it over the phone instead. The TV activation was similarly involved, except that I also wasted an hour on Comcast's online chat system just to find out that I still needed to call a phone number.

said by IowaCowboy:

Sounds like a truck roll is needed.

I've made an appointment to make an appointment (seriously) to have a truck roll in order to get a grounding block installed. I plan to talk to the technician about some of the other issues and hopefully bum some RG-6 with good connectors on it.

said by IowaCowboy:

Also the rural nature of your area could explain the weak signals as distance from the node/amps may be greater.

I think it's mostly the house wiring, which seems to be costing me at least 8 dBmV of signal loss between the entry to the house and the family room.

As I mentioned before, I can't yet test right at the drop due to a plastic cylindrical box that is likely covering the splice point from the drop to the house wiring, but I get decent power levels of -4 dBmV just after that. Hopefully Comcast can boost the power by at least 4 dB at the tap (so I get at least 0 dB at the drop) once I get my new house wiring installed.

-----
Edit/Update: After finding that example of RG-59 that I had accidentally/desperately used on the TV, I checked the house wiring outside the garage and found that it, too, appears to be RG-59 (I can easily bend the center conductor with my finger). This probably explains why I'm losing 8 dB of signal between the garage near the drop and the modem in the family room.

As I mentioned before, the cable to the family room on the outside of the garage is black, but the family room end is white. It appears that the family room end is RG-6. I wish I knew where they joined them and how the cables are run. It appears that there is probably no crawlspace under the garage (double-checked and saw no crawlspace vents around the garage), so I have no idea at all how the cable runs inside the walls/attic/crawlspace/whatever nor where the black RG-59 and white RG-6 are joined.