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mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to Gone

Re: Standard Broadband

Even if that's true, the CRTC has no idea what they're doing so it could either be a good or bad thing that they didn't intervene.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
said by mlerner:

Even if that's true, the CRTC has no idea what they're doing so it could either be a good or bad thing that they didn't intervene.

If the CRTC knew what they were doing, they would have never let Bell and Rogers shut down the network. Still, it's worth noting that they forced Bell to continue operating the network in areas where they received rural broadband funding or something such.


grayfox

join:2007-12-10
Whitby, ON

2 edits
said by Gone:

said by mlerner:

Even if that's true, the CRTC has no idea what they're doing so it could either be a good or bad thing that they didn't intervene.

If the CRTC knew what they were doing, they would have never let Bell and Rogers shut down the network. Still, it's worth noting that they forced Bell to continue operating the network in areas where they received rural broadband funding or something such.

The CRTC has nothing to do with this wisp.

The CRTC regulates monopolies like and they have nothing to do with frequency regulation.

edit: sorry I misread what you posted, Ignore this.

Also the Expedience system they were running was failing and replacement parts were running scares. It was old and inefficient with spectrum. Its only redeeming quality was that it had amazing non-line of sight performance due to its high transmit power allowed by its 2.5ghz license. Ive seen people installed through more then 15+ tree's the signal was 4/5 bars to a tower more then 15KM away)

Bell had no choice but to shut that system down it lived its life but it was over.

Hopefully Industry Canada will change their licensing policy for 2.5ghz and go with an approach more like with the 3.65ghz system. Or an area per area basis and break them down to small enough areas to allow smaller providers to move in and fill the gap with better service and better performance.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
I would have hoped that Bell and/or Rogers would have continued to do something with 2.5GHz using upgraded equipment for exactly the reasons you describe, rather than claiming that HSPA on 850/1900 was an equivalent service and then forcing fixed-point customers onto what is essentially just a cell phone data plan with the high latency and high prices to go with it.

Did they sell the license? I would imagine that there would be some sort of requirement for the license to be utilized for rural broadband as that was what Inukshuk originally received the license for. The fact that the incumbents are allowed to buy up spectrum and then just sit on it and do nothing is a major issue that is going to eventually need to be dealt with.