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Zoder

join:2002-04-16
Miami, FL
reply to GTFan

Re: Who Killed the Open Set-Top-Box?

I think smart TVs could be a way forward for 2 way services. Imagine an xfinity app that your tv downloads and then you can access all of the content from the xfinity tv site. Then all the tv would need is a way to be allowed to decrypt the channels regular. Either cablecard or a new standard that they could come up with.

I've had a chance to play with a relatives Samsung Smart TV and found the Hulu app very easy to use.

Btw, why can't/don't current retail cablecard services support 2 way communication? The rented boxes use cablecards and they support it fine.



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

said by Zoder:

why can't/don't current retail cablecard services support 2 way communication? The rented boxes use cablecards and they support it fine.

The CableCARD has always supported 2-way. It's the devices they plug into which need RF transmitters and the proper software to support 2-way.

The rented boxes have the needed RF transmitters and software to enable the 2-way.
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If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.

Zoder

join:2002-04-16
Miami, FL

Thanks. So why hasn't any retail device included the transmitters? Lack of interest by the manufacturers or roadblocks by Cablelabs?



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

said by Zoder:

Thanks. So why hasn't any retail device included the transmitters? Lack of interest by the manufacturers or roadblocks by Cablelabs?

Lack of interest by the makers/consumers along with high fees due to Cablelabs testing and software creation/support.

Makers didn't get enough interest in 1-way CableCard gear, so most dropped that years ago and just went with QAM tuners.

A bunch of manufactures signed on to support tru2way (2-way CableCard access) several years ago but after a couple years nothing from the consumer manufacturer side came of it besides 1 Panasonic TV. Then the FCC announced the creation of AllVid, which hasn't gone anywhere.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.

Russ6

join:2011-03-17
Houston, TX
kudos:1
reply to Zoder

said by Zoder:

Thanks. So why hasn't any retail device included the transmitters? Lack of interest by the manufacturers or roadblocks by Cablelabs?

The following excerpt from an old article on the Open Cable web site explains why.
quote:
. . .

From the very early specifications and draft standards, the CableCARD module has been a two-way device. That is, it included the functionality to enable two-way communication on the cable plant. This two-way communication is necessary for a variety of advanced cable services including video on demand (VOD), switched digital video (SDV), interactive services and applications.

The media has frequently reported that first-generation CableCARD 1.0 modules are one-way devices. This is simply not true. CableLabs had always intended to develop the CableCARD module and host receiver standards with two-way capability. However the manufacturers of digital TVs requested that a host standard be developed that only had one-way capability. This one-way cable-ready receiver was defined by the FCC's Plug & Play order and by the Joint Test Suite (JTS). It is the definition of this one-way receiver that lacks the ability for two-way functionality, not the CableCARD module. While the FCC defined the elements of the one-way cable-ready receiver, CableLabs continued to define specifications for two-way receivers.

When a CableCARD 1.0 module is used with a two-way receiver (e.g., Samsung HLR5067C) that card supports all the necessary two-way functionality for VOD, SDV, and other interactive services.

. . .

»www.opencable.com/primer/cableca···mer.html
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