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koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to Subaru

Re: UPS on computer

Short story as a data point for your purchase:

As someone who has strictly bought TrippLite UPSes for home (and APC UPSes for datacenters; their residential products tend to be crap), I recently decided to invest in a CyberPower sine wave PSU. I wasn't sure what I was really in for, considering the name of the company (I tend to avoid anything with "Cyber" in the name ). What I ended up getting was the CP850PFCLCD.

I must say that I was blown out of the water. I had no idea how expansive the feature set was; no need for a Kill-a-Watt, this thing has all that built-in. Literally everything I cared about (including tracking the number of outage events!) this thing had, even down to the little things (the LCD shuts itself off after being idle for a little while, and the product has no ugly blue LEDs). I was delighted -- and I'm probably the world's biggest stickler when it comes to product quality. The only downside was the length of the AC cord (it's a few feet shorter than my TrippLite units and I only have 2 grounded outlets in my entire flat).

I let it charge for about 24 hours and then gave it a test (yanked power cord from the wall). Worked like a charm, no issues... except for what I heard.

It turns out these UPSes have very small fans inside of them (probably 72mm), almost certainly to keep the battery from overheating (something found in datacenter-class UPSes as well). The problem with mine was that the fan was obviously broken or malfunctioning somehow -- either a broken fan motor or fan blades rubbing against plastic or a wire (!!!). And let me tell you, it was loud. If I gently squeezed the top of the PSU the fan noise would either decrease or increase, as would the frequency. The fan remains on for quite some time even after AC power is restored (this is also common even with datacenter-class UPSes).

Not a single review on Amazon or Youtube or anywhere else even bothered to mention this fact. People doing "unboxings" and showing off things about the UPS, but not a single person actually bothered documenting the behaviour when AC power was lost, or that the unit had a fan. (Sometimes I wonder if I should be running a hardware review site -- then again, if I did, I doubt any vendor would dare send me their products citing scathing reviews )

Since I buy most of my stuff through Amazon due to its excellent return policy, I figured I got a dud that somehow got damaged in shipping or a QC person did not test it thoroughly. The product overall was wonderful except for that, so why should I give up? It turns out Amazon sells these things but won't do returns on them, citing "hazardous material" (likely battery acid).

So I mailed CyberPower about the problem and got a response (and not from India or someplace overseas) within about 24 hours. The CSR was a bit surprised (and worried/shocked) and happily agreed to send me a replacement unit + provide a return shipping label. Off it went that same day, via UPS. It took a full 7 working days for the thing to make it to Minnesota (don't ask), and within 48 hours of CyberPower accepting the package they had sent me an FYI notice with the tracking number of the replacement.

BTW, regarding the "hazardous materials" and shipping, I myself wondered: if Amazon won't take it back citing this problem, how is it CyberPower was able to do it? It became obvious when they sent me their Microsoft Word Document for an exchange. It explicitly states you have to put this on the outside of the package:

quote:
NON-SPILLABLE BATTERIES
NON-HAZARDOUS
IMDG SP238, IATA A67
DOT 49 CFR 173.159(d)

Hey man, check out my non-hazardous hazardous materials! *blink* Whee. I'll let you know how the replacement turns out. I really hope I just got a bunk unit (I know what bad fans sound like), because overall the product was amazing.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

My last UPS was a PK Black Out Buster.. I think it was like 325vA but yeah I agree.. it's hooked up now and I like how I can see my load instant it's really nice.. when I'm done needing it for these next few days I'm going to hook it up to the LCD tv I think it pulls about 180W.

I don't have a fan in mine but I would not be surprised to see the larger units had one.

And I checked some reviews on Amazon and one person said the same about Amazon not taking back the unit for exchange which a SLA battery is safe to ship.

having said that I'm looking at getting this one for my next build

»www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP1000···BKE9EFIQ

Oh and I hate that about unboxing videos.. they spend so much time raving how it's packed but it's that little stuff I like to hear about
--
It's NOT Ni-kon It's NE-KON!




LG is NOT Lifes Good It's Lucky Goldstar!



Raphion

join:2000-10-14
Samsara
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

The fans are to keep the inverter transistors cool. The batteries themselves don't need anymore than a bit of passive ventilation. If you ever retrofit a UPS with more battery capacity, make sure it has a fan, because a fanless one would probably overheat during the longer than designed runtime.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

Ah, yeah I guess that makes sense. Our business-grade APC at my previous job had 8 or 9 extension batteries attached to it, and believe me, those things got hot (some got so hot that they expanded to the point where they couldn't be removed from their enclosures for recycling; apparently a well-known problem). So I always assumed the fan was to keep the internal battery (in the main unit) cool. Thanks for correcting + educating me!
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

1 recommendation

reply to koitsu

I received my replacement CP850PFCLCD from CyberPower today.

When AC power is lost, the fan emits a slight "whirr" or "buzz" to it, but it's hardly loud -- sounds like your average 72mm (maybe smaller) fan. I will admit it would drive me crazy if it was running 24x7x365, but for short periods when the power is lost, it's very tolerable.

So yep, I just got a lemon the first time around. Happy koitsu!
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

glad to see the replacement works!