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Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN

New Build, No POST

Assembled my new computer and pressing the power button, either on motherboard or case, the fans spin for a second and then power off. Pressing the power button again produces nothing until power is removed and then the fans will spin briefly.

No indicators on the motherboard for the issue. Have disconnected and reconnected everything, to the point of pulling the motherboard out of the case.

Hoping this is something simple, but I'm not seeing it.

Parts list:

Case - COOLER MASTER COSMOS II

PSU - COOLER MASTER Silent Pro Hybrid 850W

Motherboard - ASUS P9X79 DELUXE

CPU - Intel Core i7-3930K Sandy Bridge-E

CPU Cooler - COOLER MASTER Hyper 212

RAM - 32GB kit (8GBx4), Ballistix 240-pin DIMM, DDR3 PC3-12800

Video Card - ASUS GTX670-DC2-2GD5 GeForce GTX 670

SSD Boot Drive - Intel 520 Series Cherryville 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

Optical Drive - LITE-ON 12X BD-R 2X BD-RE 16X DVD+R 12X DVD-RAM 8X BD-ROM
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Relkin

join:2006-03-05
nightmare
Try clearing the cmos? Remember the 8 pin cpu power cable? Try to power up without any drives attached and only 1 stick of ram? Extra power cables to the vid card on?


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
said by Relkin:

Try clearing the cmos? Remember the 8 pin cpu power cable? Try to power up without any drives attached and only 1 stick of ram? Extra power cables to the vid card on?

Clearing the CMOS allows me to get the 1 second fan run without removing power.

I've got the 8 pin attached, but the PSU doesn't have an 8 pin, it has a pair of CPU 4+4pin Connectors with pins 1 and 2 common and pins 3 and 4 +12 volts. They are keyed and find into the 8 pin connector.

Tried with just one stick of RAM, but had drives attached. Will try without.

Extra power cables are on video card, LEDs indicate good power.
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rusdi
American V
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-28
Flippin, AR
kudos:2
reply to Kilroy
Be very sure the HSF is secure, (and flat) on the CPU. It doesn't take but a fraction of a second for the CPU to heat beyond limits and shut down.
--
Come fold for a cure with us @ Team Helix.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
said by rusdi:

Be very sure the HSF is secure, (and flat) on the CPU. It doesn't take but a fraction of a second for the CPU to heat beyond limits and shut down.

That's fine, though I do hate Intel no longer providing a heat sink and fan with their retail CPUs. So much easier when you knew it would work, rather than this heat sink and fan that will mount on just about anything.
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rusdi
American V
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-28
Flippin, AR
kudos:2
reply to Kilroy
Well, I'm not familiar enough with LGA 2011 platform, but looking @ that board and the first two reviews may give a clue.
It seems they may be having similar trouble with their boards, as you.

From Newegg reviews:

1."Great Board with lots of features

Pros: A lot of features. UEFI offers a great way to tweak settings and all.

Cons: I would have given it 5 but it did take some work to get it to POST. I suggest flashing BIOS to the latest version(1203) with my current build. Also be careful were you connect the CPU fan header. There are 3 fan headers on the top right 1 black 3 pin and 2 white 4 pin. I could not get it post when I had the it in the black fan header but once I moved it it posted.

Other Thoughts: Now it runs smoothly. Windows 7 Pro installed with 16GB of RAM."

2."Pros: Flashback BIOS and offline BIOS upgrade should make this board a winner.

Cons: Getting a board with a working northbridge is a crapshoot.

Other Thoughts: I odered over $2000 of parts from Newegg to build my new uberbox. Cooler Master Cosmos II? Check. Thernaltake 1050W PS? Check. Core i7 3930k? Check. Patriot Viper memory? Check. Corsair H100? Check. Nothing too exotic and brand new.

Received everything with glee on the same da. Called into work to take the following day off, and proceeded to build my new tower of glory. Got it all put together and held my breath. Nothing happened. No Q-codes. Figured the POWERSW connector came loose. Power lights on mobo. Pressing mobo power button did noting also.

Called Asus. Went through the script. moved memory around, no result. Tech basically said mobo was shot, as nothing happened regardless if all memory is removed (which should cause a Q-code squeal).

So now I am stuck with over $2k in equipment I can't use. Phone hours are up so I elect to chat with India. They express their apologies but offer no help in expediting a paid replacement. They could care less."
--
Come fold for a cure with us @ Team Helix.

Relkin

join:2006-03-05
nightmare
reply to Kilroy
Have a meter to check and see if power supply is putting out the right voltages? It's sounding like a dead MB or power supply.

If you really want to try everything you could try to flash the bios via the usb port and the bios button on the back.

You could also pull the vid card out and see if it tries to boot, will fail naturally but you should get a red light on the motherboard for vga failure i think.(It has lights for the major parts, ram, vga, boot device...if you didn't know}


koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to Kilroy
The behaviour described sounds like the model or revision (stepping) of CPU used is not supported by the system BIOS.

»www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_···XE/#CPUS

Says:

CPU                                         Since PCB     Since BIOS
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Core i7-3930K (3.2G,L3:12M,6C,HT,rev.C1)    ALL           0906
 

Verify what exact model and revision (stepping) CPU you bought.

If the motherboard has the BIOS version printed on the actual chip (sometimes a sticker), that's useful. Otherwise, it sounds like you may be running the BIOS version 0802 which does not work with this model of CPU.

So how do you solve this problem?

1. Get a different CPU that does work with 0802, temporarily put that in + upgrade BIOS to 0906 + remove CPU + install one you want

2. Purchase a replacement 0906-flashed BIOS chip from an online manufacturer and install it yourself, assuming the BIOS chip is socketable

3. Open a ticket with Asus Support and make this their problem. They can probably advise you on ways to solve this.

--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.

Relkin

join:2006-03-05
nightmare

1 edit
said by koitsu:

The behaviour described sounds like the model or revision (stepping) of CPU used is not supported by the system BIOS.

»www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_···XE/#CPUS

Says:

CPU                                         Since PCB     Since BIOS
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Core i7-3930K (3.2G,L3:12M,6C,HT,rev.C1)    ALL           0906
 

Verify what exact model and revision (stepping) CPU you bought.

If the motherboard has the BIOS version printed on the actual chip (sometimes a sticker), that's useful. Otherwise, it sounds like you may be running the BIOS version 0802 which does not work with this model of CPU.

So how do you solve this problem?

1. Get a different CPU that does work with 0802, temporarily put that in + upgrade BIOS to 0906 + remove CPU + install one you want

2. Purchase a replacement 0906-flashed BIOS chip from an online manufacturer and install it yourself, assuming the BIOS chip is socketable

3. Open a ticket with Asus Support and make this their problem. They can probably advise you on ways to solve this.

Or just use the usb port and bios flash button, no cpu required.

»event.asus.com/2012/mb/USB_BIOS_···k_GUIDE/

And unless he got a board that has been sitting on the shelf since they launched this is not likely the problem.


koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
That's pretty remarkable, specifically because it does say "No CPU required".

Something has to run the code that does the actual flashing. Something has to run the code that loads a USB stack. Unless there is a completely alternate/separate microprocessor on the motherboard somewhere (maybe something like a PIC16C84), I'm not sure how Asus is doing this.

Maybe there's a little microprocessor inside of that lit "USB" button (yes really, basic/cheap CPUs can fit in there), but I don't know. I'd love to know how they accomplished this.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


mattrixx

join:2004-02-18
Orland Park, IL
reply to Kilroy
Same thing happened to me a couple months back with a new Asus Socket 1155 "Sandy Bridge" system. Turns out the trouble with *MY* new build "NO POST" was that some of the MB`s LGA Socket "pins" were bent!

After I RMA`d the MB to, and then received back from Newegg, neither Newegg nor Asus wanted to own up to the bent pins! Asus claimed the pins were fine at the time of inspection when they put their protective cover over the socket,
and Newegg claimed it was damaged goods when I RMA`d it.

The thing is, I did NOT visually inspect the socket BEFORE I initially installed my CPU. I assumed everything was A-OK! I am NO amateur at system building, and have in the past had NO problem correctly inserting a cpu into an LGA socket
and pushing down on a locking arm, so I don`t really know how these pins got to be "bent" in the first place?

There was No way I was ever going to be able to prove it was NOT my negligence which caused the bent pins, which in effect, left me with a dead Motherboard and possibly a burned up CPU.
Suffice it to say, there was only one thing left for me to do, which was to try and UN BEND the pins in question and hope for the best.

I purchased a Head Magnifier with battery powered light to be able to better see, and manually pushed and prodded with a jeweler screwdriver and straight pin the several MB pins back into (semi) correct alignment.
After which replacing the chip and cooler, I was then able to successfully rescue my MB and system back from the dead!

My point to all this is, if you have eliminated all other possibilities for your "NO POST" new build, including incorrect Motherboard brass standoff placement and Power Supply "issues",
you might want to pull the cooler and chip off the MB and have a "good look" into the status of the MB LGA Socket itself, also check the marks on the backside of the cpu where the chip makes contact with the pins
to see if there are indeed (pin) marks on all of the "pads".

Relkin

join:2006-03-05
nightmare
reply to koitsu
After checking the manual I'm fairly sure he would be getting an q code if it was an unsupported processor. Page 2-23 of the manual q code 56 Invalid CPU type or Speed.

As for how asus does the bios flash it's something on the motherboard, you just put the new bios file on any standard fat16 or 32 formatted flash drive and plug it into a specific usb port then press a button for 3 seconds to start it. They don't bother with the details on how it works in the manual.

Still sounds like a bum board or bum power supply to me.

I actually just put together a system using this board and cpu about a week ago. Mines been running like a champ since i put it together.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
reply to Kilroy
I'm leaning towards a bum board, from the New Egg ratings I wouldn't be the first. I sent an e-mail to the address the Asus posts in the all of the one Egg ratings to see what I can get done.

I'm getting power lights on the board and video card. But I'm not getting any error codes or lights.

I'm thinking I'm going to run into the same issues as mattrixx See Profile did.

bevills1

join:2006-05-29
Reviews:
·Charter
In my experience connecting no hardware other than video card and monitor the computer will post unless the mobo is bad. The first time this happened was with a mobo I bought from a local store, and I called the seller when I got no post. The seller told me to disconnect everything except the video card and monitor, and it should post unless the mobo was bad and to return the mobo if still no post. The seller told me also to connect 1 hardware device at a time if it posts, checking to see if it'd still post until all hardware was connected with it still posting I still got no post and returned the mobo which tested bad by the seller when he tested it and then exchanged it for a working replacement.

A couple of years later I had another no post with another mobo ordered from NewEgg, and I remembered and tried connecting only the video card and monitor which resulted in normal post to BIOS since no drives were connected. I then connected 1 hardware device at a time checking to see if it'd still post until all hardware was connected with it still posting. I don't know why this procedure is necessary or why it works with some boards, but it does seem to work. I've built probably a dozen other systems that worked withoutthe need to try this procedure, but it seems to be necessary for some systems.

I suggest you try this procedure which should result in post unless the mobo is bad. You'll be relegated to returning it if is bad, but you might avoid that hassle if it's not bad and posts with just the monitor connected.

bbear2
Premium
join:2003-10-06
94045
kudos:5
Reviews:
·VOIPO
reply to Kilroy
If you are ready to RMA it fine. If not, then here's what I always suggest for any new build. Put the bare minimum pieces together outside the case on a non-conductive surface. Should be the MB, 1 stick of RAM, CPU/cooler, video card if there is no embedded video controller (otherwise use the embedded). Hook up mouse, KB, and monitor. Make sure the PC spkr is plugged in so you can hear beeps. Don't forget the extra +12V plug directly onto the MB.

If that works, then add things one by one until everything is connected and working as expected. Then disassemble everything except CPU/cooler; install MB into case and start the process all over again. This might seem tedious and redundant to some, but if you run into a situation whereby something isn't quite right, this will save you tons of time and frustration.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
reply to Kilroy
I haven't gotten a response back from Asus at the adress they posted in their New Egg rebutals. So, I requested an RMA for the Motherboard. I'll have the board ready to ship tomorrow if I don't hear from them by later this evening. I fully expect New Egg to claim bent pins. Though from looking at it when I reseated the CPU it looked like they were all bent by design to act as a spring to ensure contact.

I would like to address some of the responses I received.

rusdi See Profile - There is no way the CPU overheads in a fraction of a second. No way it goes from 75 degrees Fahrenheit to over 158 degrees in less than a minute, much less the second it is powered up. If it did Intel should get into the hot plate business.

Relkin See Profile - I don't have a meter, and it isn't up long enough to test. I am going to move the motherboard's 8-pin plug to the other connector on the PSU and see if that makes a difference. I can also try a different PSU, the one in my current machine, and see if that makes a difference. Kind of hope that the PSU is the problem since it is much easier to replace than the rest.

bbear2 See Profile - Assembling outside the case is bad for a few reasons. Grounding is the biggest. Physical support would be second, especially for a video card. I haven't had a case in quite some time that had a PC speaker. In the end I believe you can do more harm than good by assembling your machine outside of the case.

This isn't my first build, nor the first time I've had issues. However, I haven't built in years and this issue seems familiar, hence why I posted. I was hoping for a quick fix or sure problem would be known.

Unfortunately I believe I have an issue with one of three parts, motherboard, CPU, or PSU. The PSU is the only thing I can test since I don't have another motherboard or CPU that is known good and will work with these parts.
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Gordo74
Premium
join:2003-10-28
Monroeville, PA
said by Kilroy:

bbear2 See Profile - Assembling outside the case is bad for a few reasons. Grounding is the biggest. Physical support would be second, especially for a video card. I haven't had a case in quite some time that had a PC speaker. In the end I believe you can do more harm than good by assembling your machine outside of the case.

Assembling the PC outside of the case (on top of the motherboard box with the antistatic bag below the motherboard) is actually quite a common troubleshooting mechanism.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
said by Gordo74:

Assembling the PC outside of the case (on top of the motherboard box with the antistatic bag below the motherboard) is actually quite a common troubleshooting mechanism.

Just because it is common doesn't mean it is right. If you're not building in a case you should be building on a test stand.
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AsherN
Premium
join:2010-08-23
Thornhill, ON
reply to Kilroy
said by Kilroy:

rusdi See Profile - There is no way the CPU overheads in a fraction of a second. No way it goes from 75 degrees Fahrenheit to over 158 degrees in less than a minute, much less the second it is powered up. If it did Intel should get into the hot plate business.

Haven't done it since the P4 days, but even then a CPU would not clear POST before thermal checking. Given the added density, yes I could see it in that short amount of time.

AsherN
Premium
join:2010-08-23
Thornhill, ON
reply to Kilroy
said by Kilroy:

said by Gordo74:

Assembling the PC outside of the case (on top of the motherboard box with the antistatic bag below the motherboard) is actually quite a common troubleshooting mechanism.

Just because it is common doesn't mean it is right. If you're not building in a case you should be building on a test stand.

You need something to raise the MB of your work space (the box) and ensire that nothing can short the contacts on yhe underside of the board (the anti static bag).

Those rigs are great if you o a lot of testing as they allow a permanent PSU to a test setup. For the oe of we mostly all fo, box+anti static bag is great.

Relkin

join:2006-03-05
nightmare
reply to Kilroy
Here's another thought, did you try to power it up without the case switches for power/reset connected? It's rare but having a stuck switch can screw things up. Also the chances of a bad cpu are extremely low. Based on newegg and amazon reviews it does seem a bad board is the most likely.


mattrixx

join:2004-02-18
Orland Park, IL

1 edit
reply to Kilroy
Just to clarify my previous POST on "bent pins". Yes, the "pins" are set on an angle and on my 1155 Socket, divided into sections going different directions!
These pins protrude like an upside down angled "L"and act as sort of a spring cushion when the CPU is placed upon them.

You can generally spot any misaligned or "bent" pins by moving around a strong light into the socket to catch any irregular reflections. If you see any abnormal or inconsistent reflections,
chances are some of those pins are not "standing" correct and consequently not registering on the CPU causing all sorts of potential problems.
I had to deal with "only" 1155 pins, where as you are dealing with 2011!

Good Luck

(edit: cpu to 1155 Socket)

praetoralpha

join:2005-08-06
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Kilroy
I had a similar experience with my 2008 build. First day was great: everything worked, was installing everything. Next day: everything dead. Disconnected everything, monitor + cpu + ram only (intel integrated gpu), and still nothing. RMA'd the mobo, and everything was fine for years.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
Well, connected the power supply from my computer. Fans spin much longer, get a red CPU light, then reboot. I doubt the CPU is bad, more likely the pins on the board. This is not one of Intel's better socket designs. No obvious bent pins, but pin marks missing from some of the CPU pads. I'm sending back the motherboard. Worst case I have to buy another one. Wish New Egg had an advanced RMA set up.

This does bring up another question. Since the board powered up long enough to see the error with a different PSU am I going to have issues with the new PSU? Or, is it smarter and knows there is a problem and cuts power?

In the mean time I installed the new video card in my current machine and will install the SSD tonight with Windows 8.
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Relkin

join:2006-03-05
nightmare
Had the cpu been taken out and put back in when you tried the psu from your other machine? If so it could have been seated a little better allowing the board to at least try to boot. You could always try the new psu on the old computer to test it out.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
ya go through the process of elimination.

Old PS on new board, New on old.

That bios update method they mentioned. (btw always check for a bios update for new systems, best to update it before its in regular use.)


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
reply to Relkin
said by Relkin:

Had the cpu been taken out and put back in when you tried the psu from your other machine?

No, I just installed the PSU from my current machine. No other changes.

May install the new PSU on the new machine this evening.
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rusdi
American V
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-28
Flippin, AR
kudos:2
reply to AsherN
said by AsherN:

said by Kilroy:

rusdi See Profile - There is no way the CPU overheads in a fraction of a second. No way it goes from 75 degrees Fahrenheit to over 158 degrees in less than a minute, much less the second it is powered up. If it did Intel should get into the hot plate business.

Haven't done it since the P4 days, but even then a CPU would not clear POST before thermal checking. Given the added density, yes I could see it in that short amount of time.

That's because it CAN and WILL go that high, that fast if the HSF isn't properly attached and contacting the top of the CPU correctly!

Not trying to be argumentative here, since this obviously isn't the problem, it was just a suggestion as a place to start looking.

Hope you find the trouble. Good luck!
--
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FizzyMyNizzy

join:2004-05-29
New York, NY

1 recommendation

reply to Kilroy

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=06MYYB9bl70


»ark.intel.com/products/63697/Int···_80-GHz)
Thermal Monitoring Technologies protect the processor package and the system from thermal failure through several thermal management features. An on-die Digital Thermal Sensor (DTS) detects the core's temperature, and the thermal management features reduce package power consumption and thereby temperature when required in order to remain within normal operating limits


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
All fine and dandy, but you're not going to see those kind of thermals during POST. If you are seeing those thermal during POST your CPU already has issues. As you can see they are running, what at the time, was I'm sure a CPU intensive game. I would not advise running a CPU without proper cooling, but for the testing purposes and the one second of up time I was getting, thermals were not the problem.

Heard back from Asus. Told them since it took two days to get a response the board was sent back. They agreed it sounded like a board issue.