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Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

3 edits

Splitting Coax (F-Type RG6) 16-Way Preferably Rack-Mounted?

Started a fairly large home wiring project (9 drops for a total of 22 gigabit ports, 4 phone lines to each drop, and a coax connection at each drop). Everything terminates in a centrally located 19" rack in my hallway closet.

I'm an IT professional (server administrator), so I had no problems designing the ethernet patching. Even the phone was rather easy once I figured out I could hack together a standard patch panel to distribute telephone. But the coax splitting/patching is giving me great difficulty.

Are there no affordable rack-mounted splitting solutions? Is my only option to buy a 16-way splitter, terminate the unused ports, and velcro it to a rack shelf? On a side note, with the runs ranging from 10-40 feet each, do I need an amplifier instead?

Edit: I want 1 modem and 3-4 TVs with live ports. I'd be willing to pull a new quadshield leg back to the demark, split 2-way to modem and a 4-way, then from the 4-way to the patch panel and off to the wall plates, if that would help mitigate loss any. As needs change and equipment moves, I could just switch out which wall plates were "hot".



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

Coax splitters are pretty small. I'm not aware of rack mounted splitter. That is no reason why you could not build your own by mounting them in a rackable chassis.

With that many splits you are going to need additional amplification.

/tom



Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
Premium
join:2002-05-21
Burlington, WV
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to Thadius856

Do yourself a favor and just home run all the RG-6 cables back to a box, something like an ONQ box, and just terminated the ones that are currently in use. Leave the other cables disconnected until needed. Then when needed remove the connector for the cable that is no longer be needed and connect the cable for the new location.

Don't know what service you are using for your TV. If DirecTV or Dish they both have switches that support up to 8 ports. A terminating load is placed on the unused cables, when you want to move the TV to that cable just remove the terminator and connect the TV. The terminator that you just removed can then be placed on the connector from where the TV was removed.

As previously pointed out keep the splits to the minimum required.

Just some options.



THZNDUP
Deorum Offensa Diis Curae
Premium
join:2003-09-18
Lard
kudos:2
reply to Thadius856

Since you said rack, you could just drill some holes to mount the splitters on a 2U or 3U blank panel or even on the backside of a wire management panel. Depending on what type of rack screws, tapped rails, etc you could even use those.
--
one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything


Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

1 recommendation

reply to Thadius856

said by tschmidt:

Coax splitters are pretty small. I'm not aware of rack mounted splitter. That is no reason why you could not build your own by mounting them in a rackable chassis.

With that many splits you are going to need additional amplification.

/tom

Guess I'll stick to a 2-way for the modem, then a 4-way for the TVs. Think I might just velcro it all to a 1U shelf.

said by Hank:

Do yourself a favor and just home run all the RG-6 cables back to a box, something like an ONQ box, and just terminated the ones that are currently in use. Leave the other cables disconnected until needed. Then when needed remove the connector for the cable that is no longer be needed and connect the cable for the new location.

Don't know what service you are using for your TV. If DirecTV or Dish they both have switches that support up to 8 ports. A terminating load is placed on the unused cables, when you want to move the TV to that cable just remove the terminator and connect the TV. The terminator that you just removed can then be placed on the connector from where the TV was removed.

As previously pointed out keep the splits to the minimum required.

Just some options.

This closet rack is meant take the place of an OnQ or similar box, at a much lower cost.

Currently have no TV service for the last 7 months (only internet). Probably switching to Comcast in 4 months. Dislike the lag when channel flipping on satellite, but with the same lag now present in digital CATV boxes, I may have to just bite the bullet eventually.

said by THZNDUP:

Since you said rack, you could just drill some holes to mount the splitters on a 2U or 3U blank panel or even on the backside of a wire management panel. Depending on what type of rack screws, tapped rails, etc you could even use those.

Hmmmmm. On a blank panel. Hadn't considered this. Genius! Think I'll try this.

Thanks for all the help guys. I finished pulling 90% of the runs today before the attic reached over 100ºF. Could have finished, but I insist on tight bundles, avoiding all electrical, and religious use of cable stackers every 2 feet, plus had to cut out some drywall to get past a few double 2x4 fire blocks. Just a few more cables to pull to finish up in the morning, including the runs to the access points and demarks.




2 Ethernet, 4x Telephone (1/2, 3/4 jacks), 1 coax and one spare Cat6 at each location.




Finished the office before quitting time due to heat.




Opening walls to get through blocks. If the roof slope was taller, I could have instead used a cable bit from above.




The wiring closet, so far.




A little closer.

Thanks for the insights, guys.


Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
Premium
join:2002-05-21
Burlington, WV
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

OK, a little more clear what you are actually doing. Here is a patch panel that will fit your application:

»www.l-com.com/item.aspx?id=853

When you decide who your TV provider is going to be ask them about a splitter or splitter/amp combination that will fit your requirements.

If the provider supplies the splitter/amp just purchase a shelve to place those items on and use the panel above to make the patch changes easier.


Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

Pretty nice looking product. If it absolutely had to be 16-port for me to be satisfied, I'd go for it. But $97.10 after tax and shipping makes it a little hard to swallow.

Borrowing on that idea, it looks like I can piece together a 24-port version using Monoprice parts for $15.43, plus tax and $8 shipping.

1x Keystone Jack Panel, 24 ports (#7260) $7.03 ea
24x Keystone Jack - Modular F Type, Black (#6544) $0.35 ea.

Now to just convince myself (and my OCD) that it doesn't *need* to be a 16-port version. :\

Thanks a ton!


aguen
Premium
join:2003-07-16
Grants Pass, OR
kudos:2
reply to Thadius856

Here's one that might better fit your budget.
»www.computercablestore.com/16_Po···362.aspx


medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
reply to Thadius856

keep the pictures coming...

I wanna see how yours end up looking like....

just one question though, why 4 phones lines to each drop? that's a lot of phone lines....even if you did use them as data, that's still a lot. just wondering...


Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to Thadius856

Progress update, for those interested.

Cabling from above:








Those are Garder-Bender cable stackers, if anybody decides they want to use them. About $5 for a 20-pk at blue home improvement store.

Cut holes and wired for one two-gang receptacle on each side (total 8 outlets).




Cut holes for and wired two ethernet lines to each of two locations for access points. Didn't want to do PoE because of the bundle size and heat dissipation, so installed GFCIs nearby.



Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

Decided I'd rather have 2 three-gang worth of electrical per side (total 24 outlets). In hindsight, maybe a little overkill.




Started punching down drops. Each is two ethernet, four phone lines on two 6P6C jacks, one coax, and one spare ethernet (perhaps repurposed for future HDMI distribution or PoE or... something else?). Rooms are color coded (green bedrooms, blue kitchen/bath, yellow office, black entertainment room, orange access points, red to demarks).




Punched down access points. Had to go back later and switch the red to orange per my color code.




From behind.



Installed receptacles and face plates. Shelves came out. Spackled. Retextured problem areas. Painted. Installed crown (ran out of trim paint, so just primed for now). 7U server rack going in.




Added Rubbermaid Configurations modular closet system (4-to-8 foot kit custom cut down to 26").


Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to Thadius856

Click for full size
Click for full size
To answer the question, the reason that there's 4 phone lines to each location is because I didn't but any Cat3 cable. With about 500 feet leftover, I figured I might as well use up as much of the Cat6 as I could. Cat6 has 4 pairs (8 wires) and each phone line needs only two, so, four lines per Cat6 cable. Can't install half a cable or a quarter of a cable. :P

Stripped back 10' of Cat6 and punched down across every jack on a 24-port patch panel. Voila, 4 phone lines distributed each to up to 23 locations (23 out, 1 in). Took me an hour and $18 worth of materials. Structured wiring panel units are smaller, uglier, and cost a whole lot more.







Finished the cable chase with brush plates to keep bugs and rodents out, cool air in, and the insulation up in the attic. This is 3 one-gang units that utilize a decora strap style; threw away the three one-gang plates and replaced with one three-gang plate.



Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

1 recommendation

reply to Thadius856

First patch panel going in. Shelf installed up-side-down to simulate switch "hard floor" for service loops while it was in shipment.




Many hours later, first patch panel done.




Switch arrives. Second, large patch panel (spare ethernet, phone, coax) almost done... but not satisfied with it. Note that coax connects in the wrong direction (backside of barrels are empty).




Replacement patch panels arrive today. Swap white phone keystones for ivory. Punch down spare ethernet keystones. Replace large patch panel. Install surge protection. Preliminary patching.




Cable guy showed up to connect service. I asked him to split incoming drop at the demark so 1st port would patch to router and 2nd port would patch to 4-way coax splitter for 3 TVs. Instead, he does not split at the demark, instead uses a single 4-way on 1st port. Not sure I'm satisfied, but TVs and modem getting good signal.

Router and modem patched in temporarily until I can hide them on the shelf. Connecting to port 1 at gigabit speeds. Super happy.




Old internet tested 4.5 mbps down / 300 kbps up. New connection tests at this speed:



Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

1 recommendation

Was in a race against time because the insulation guys were scheduled. They re-insulated since the OP.








medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
reply to Thadius856

very nice!!!!

if only there was a like button here...

anyway, can you post links on where you got the racks and mounts incl. the patch panels?

thanks


Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

Certainly

7U Rack (1x $37.68 ea @ Monoprice)
1U 24-port Keystone Patch Panel (3x $6.75 ea @ Monoprice)
1U 24-port Type 110 Keystone Patch Panel (1x $17.07 ea @ Monoprice) - modified for phone distribution
2U Rack Shelf (1x $18.65 ea @ Monoprice) - re-drilled for 1U holes
1U CyberPower CPS-1215RMS 12-plug Rackmount PDU / 1800J Surge (1x $39.99 ea @ Amazon)
1U Zyxel GS1100-24 Gigabit 24-port Unmanaged Switch with Rack Ears & 2x SFP (1x $79.99 ea @ Newegg)

Cat6 Type 110 Punch Down Keystones (69x $1.47-$1.31 ea @ Monoprice)
F Type Barrel Keystones (11x Black $0.40 ea, 9x White $0.44 ea @ Monoprice)

Note: Used red, orange, yellow, green, blue, black, white, ivory. Would have used other colors if they were available. Purple for phone patching would have been ideal. Using a single color would have lowered keystone prices due to quantity discounts given per-item.

The patch cable order will be fairly large. In the range of 50 cables.



jeffmoss26

join:2002-07-22
Beachwood, OH
reply to Thadius856

Wow, that is quite the install. I usually only see that level of work in commercial applications. Well done!!
PS. you 'may' have gone a bit overkill on all the electrical outlets, since you have something mounted in the rack. :P


LLigetfa

join:2006-05-15
Fort Frances, ON
kudos:1

1 recommendation

said by jeffmoss26:

I usually only see that level of work in commercial applications.

If only I could get my contractors to do such fine work. {sigh}
--
Strange as it seems, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and formal education positively fortifies it. -- Stephen Vizinczey

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
reply to Thadius856

where did you get the brush plates?



jeffmoss26

join:2002-07-22
Beachwood, OH

The guy we use for all of our cabling at work does an amazing job. Coupled with our use of custom 6 and 8" patch cords and switches mounted right under the patch panels, the stuff looks really good. I will try and get some pictures.


Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to Thadius856

said by jeffmoss26:

Wow, that is quite the install. I usually only see that level of work in commercial applications. Well done!!
PS. you 'may' have gone a bit overkill on all the electrical outlets, since you have something mounted in the rack. :P

Perhaps a bit overkill on the electrical, yes. I had originally planned on surge protection at the breaker using a Square D Homeline secondary surge suppressor, but after careful study, decided that may not be enough. Hence, the rack PDU mounted over the top 1U of the 2U shelf. Originally, it was going to be left wide open on top.

said by LLigetfa:

said by jeffmoss26:

I usually only see that level of work in commercial applications.

If only I could get my contractors to do such fine work. {sigh}

If it's any consolation, I'm a server jockey for the Air Force. My shop used to handle network infrastructure, but now I'm relegated to server maintenance. I've seen plenty of 'pro' installs that look like a train wreck and have zero cable management.

said by medbuyer:

where did you get the brush plates?

The big orange home improvement retailer under the GE brand name. Also sold at the big blue home improvement retailer uinder the OnQ brand name. Packaging aside, identical products.

Thadius856

join:2006-06-15
Wheatland, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to jeffmoss26

said by jeffmoss26:

The guy we use for all of our cabling at work does an amazing job. Coupled with our use of custom 6 and 8" patch cords and switches mounted right under the patch panels, the stuff looks really good. I will try and get some pictures.

I was considering custom patches, but wasn't willing to shell out the time or money for them.

Went with 6" patches for the telephone distribution. Sized 12" patches for the keystone-to-switch legs. 8" probably would have been sufficient, but 6" was just too tight with a 24-port setup. 6" on a 16 port setup probably would have been fine.

Here's the result after 20 minutes of tearing open individually wrapped cables (ugh!) and 10 minutes of patching. Still have to tuck the router, modem, etc into the shelf. Been feeling lazy today... still in my pajamas :\




medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

said by Thadius856:




are the short gray runs phone lines?

yellow, green, blue, black and white cables are ethernet right?

what about that blue and purple on upper left?