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FF4m3

@bhn.net
reply to The Snowman

Re: Assange makes 1st public appearance in 2 months

 
 
UK seeking loophole in extradition agreement with Ecuador - 28 September, 2012:

Patino held a meeting with UK Foreign Secretary William Hague on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly.

Summarizing the results of the talks, Patino said that he received written confirmation from London that it recognizes the validity of its 1880 extradition treaty with Ecuador. According to Patino, this agreement states that in cases like Assange’s, a person cannot be extradited to a third country.

During the talks Patino reminded his counterpart that the WikiLeaks boss is under Ecuador's jurisdiction, and asserted his country's determination to protect him.

Nevertheless, Britain has pledged to seek a diplomatic solution in order to find a way to extradite Assange.

The above screenshot from British Extradition Law and Procedure: Including Extradition ..., Volume 2 beginning page 312.


Name Game
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1 edit
So funny there FF4me3..RT's stuff on Patino's propaganda to the press..must think he is in charge..links below are what really happened at that meeting...and Hague told the guy to go read that stuff..UK is not seeking a loophole..Ecuador is trying to make it all go away..knowing they have only one option..and their "guest "is not in good health..not surprised he is living on junk food.

»www.heraldsun.com.au/ipad/ecudor···83303150

»www.google.com/hostednews/ap/art···cee5276a
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AVD
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reply to FF4m3
said by FF4m3 :

UK seeking loophole in extradition agreement with Ecuador - 28 September, 2012:

Patino held a meeting with UK Foreign Secretary William Hague on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly.

Summarizing the results of the talks, Patino said that he received written confirmation from London that it recognizes the validity of its 1880 extradition treaty with Ecuador. According to Patino, this agreement states that in cases like Assange’s, a person cannot be extradited to a third country.

During the talks Patino reminded his counterpart that the WikiLeaks boss is under Ecuador's jurisdiction, and asserted his country's determination to protect him.

Nevertheless, Britain has pledged to seek a diplomatic solution in order to find a way to extradite Assange.

The above screenshot from British Extradition Law and Procedure: Including Extradition ..., Volume 2 beginning page 312.

nothing new here. I think the way it works is that Sweden should ask for extradition from equador directly. UK has no beef with Assuange.
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norwegian
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quote:
I think the way it works is that Sweden should ask for extradition from Ecuador directly
Sounds logical. Certainly better than the great lion forcing the upper hand by force as once was discussed and causing a massive international event that may spiral out of control.

I wonder how England would respond if Ecuador was to try and drive to the airport and escort him to Sweden under an extradition order of their own? Now that day I'd love to be filming the events.
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AVD
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said by norwegian:

quote:
I think the way it works is that Sweden should ask for extradition from Ecuador directly
Sounds logical. Certainly better than the great lion forcing the upper hand by force as once was discussed and causing a massive international event that may spiral out of control.

I wonder how England would respond if Ecuador was to try and drive to the airport and escort him to Sweden under an extradition order of their own? Now that day I'd love to be filming the events.

technically he did jump bail.
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Ian
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reply to norwegian
said by norwegian:



I wonder how England would respond if Ecuador was to try and drive to the airport and escort him to Sweden under an extradition order of their own? Now that day I'd love to be filming the events.

I suspect they'd stop the vehicle, and arrest Assange. The Ecuadorian consulate is Ecuadorian soil. Roads in the UK aren't. Those with him will likely not be charged with transporting a fugitive, because they'd have diplomatic immunity.
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reply to norwegian
said by norwegian:

...I wonder how England would respond if Ecuador was to try and drive to the airport and escort him to Sweden under an extradition order of their own? ...

I think that if Ecuador believed they had the legitimate right to do that, they'd already have tried it and defied UK to react against them. Part of the problem is that while there's a lot of chatter occurring between diplomats and via press releases, it's not matched by that much comprehensive, crystal-clear law and treaties... and Ecuador knows it. Assange hiding in their embassy is pretty much diplomatically unassailable... their moving Assange anywhere else is not.
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Frodo

join:2006-05-05
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reply to AVD
said by AVD:

nothing new here. I think the way it works is that Sweden should ask for extradition from equador directly. UK has no beef with Assuange.

I see a problem with trying to ask for extradition from Ecuador directly. According to this Wikipedia article, the Ecuadorian embassy is not soverign territory of Ecuador.
Contrary to popular belief, diplomatic missions do not enjoy full extraterritorial status and are not sovereign territory of the represented state.[5][6] Rather, the premises of diplomatic missions remain under the jurisdiction of the host state while being afforded special privileges (such as immunity from most local laws) by the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. Diplomats themselves still retain full diplomatic immunity, and (as an adherent to the Vienna Convention) the host country may not enter the premises of the mission without permission of the represented country. The term "extraterritoriality" is often applied to diplomatic missions, but only in this broader sense.

If this is true, then Assange is still on British soil. That could mean that Sweden needs to pursue extradition with GB. The stumbling block remains that Great Britain and Sweden decline to arrange the extradition in a way that would preclude any subsequent extradition to a 3rd country, such as the US. That would involve guarantees under article 28(4) of the Council Framework Decision of 13 June 2002 on the European arrest warrant and the surrender procedures between Member States along with arrangements to eliminate ways to circumvent that agreement. According to update one there may be a way to circumvent the framework. If that stumbling block is removed, then it is my understanding that Ecuador will surrender Assange.

However, at this point, from what I've heard, Great Britain and Sweden have declined to handle this extradition in a way that would preclude a subsequent extradition to a 3rd country.