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vzfiostechnj

@verizon.net
reply to Libra

Re: Will Verizon shut down copper phone accounts?

It is called "network evolution". Yes Verizon CAN force you off of the copper and onto the Fiber. What they CANNOT do is force you from a regulated service to a deregulated service.

You as the subscriber cannot dictate to Verizon the "transport method" in which they deliver the service.

Network evolution involves changing your transport method from the copper network onto the fiber optic network. However, your services and rates do not change.

As an example, your copper line at one point may have been a direct copper feed. As years went by your pair may have changed from direct copper to a "PG"(pair gain) system. (Half fiber/ half copper). This change would be transparent to you and you would never know we changed the transport method of delivering your service. Also, the line cards would be subject to failure and power outages just the same as an ONT, and all you would know is that your service was out without knowing the exact reason why. The backup generators and batteries for these CEVs (fiber huts) would keep the power going, similar to the Battery Backup for your FiOS ONT. The difference being they would last a lot longer than 8 hours because they are refrigerator sized units.

In summary, YES, everyone in a FiOS enabled area will eventually be forced onto the fiber, but you can keep your same deregulated services. Currently, to make the transition as smooth as possible, Verizon is requesting customers to voluntarily accept the free upgrade. When you are one of the last remaining customers in an area, you will be forced to make the change, especially if there are no spare copper pairs to provision your service in the event that the copper degrades. There is ZERO capital expenditure going into replacing copper plant where there is already a fiber overlay. The only areas that will have copper plant replaced with new copper cables are the areas that are not planned for FiOS.


norbert26
Premium
join:2010-08-10
Warwick, RI
Verizon may have a right to change the transport method however the FiOS install is very invasive. Unlike a transparent change of fiber added someplace away from the home FiOS requires a new drop brought in, an outlet to be provided, access to MY computer . For most people this is not an issue and if one is building a new home and the walls are not closed in by all means wire it for fiber from the get go (EX: run cat 6 through the walls, new coax to every room). Issues however can occur retrofitting an older home . In this case the customer can simply move on to another provider for services needed as i did. I got rid of both the verizon POTS and verizon DSL to get them off my back. I will leave this with the following: I would embrace this IF the home was new.


birdfeedr
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-11
Warwick, RI
kudos:9
said by norbert26:

the FiOS install is very invasive. Unlike a transparent change of fiber added someplace away from the home FiOS requires a new drop brought in, an outlet to be provided, access to MY computer .

Since the topic is about copper phone accounts, it's not quite so invasive. An external ONT and the fiber drop is not invasive unless you have some heirloom plantings nearby and you don't want them trampled, help the installer find a way to protect the vegetation.

Typically the PS/BBU is inside with an additional low voltage power cable through the wall to the ONT. Typically, the PSU can be located near an existing outlet without too much difficulty. Yes, this part is an inside installation, just as with an interior ONT. Invasive? Yes, in the sense someone has to be there and an installer is inside your house. Typically, for a copper phone replacement, the ONT will be located near the existing NID.

Yes, there are exceptions since one size does not fit all. MDUs are an example.

For phone service, access to your computer is not needed. For FiOS internet, access to your computer isn't needed either, although the installer will ask for access because it helps verify you get the speed you were asking for.

One thing that Verizon *is* doing, maybe not all areas, is refusing to install new dry loop DSL, except perhaps through a CLEC.

One thing they are *not* doing, is upgrading copper network in your area. When it can't be repaired or capacity is used up, fiber becomes the transport method.

When you consider corporate vs. consumer, fiber vs. copper, regulated vs. unregulated, union vs. non-union, upgrade copper vs. replace with fiber, every point under consideration has pros and cons.

It's not a black and white picture. Nothing stays the same for long.


norbert26
Premium
join:2010-08-10
Warwick, RI
said by birdfeedr See Profile

One thing that Verizon *is* doing, maybe not all areas, is refusing to install new dry loop DSL, except perhaps through a CLEC.

One thing they are *not* doing, is upgrading copper network in your area. When it can't be repaired or capacity is used up, fiber becomes the transport method.

[/BQUOTE :

] They have stopped offering any DSL to new customers in my area except through a CLEC. Even for POTS one would be hard pressed to get such over copper you would most likely get it over fiber by default. Now as far as the CLEC if one is under contract and the copper pair fails and no replacement pair is available then the CLEC would have to relieve customer from contract or else Verizon would be obligated to repair said pair even if it means patch it up. Granted in time the copper will go away and it will be choose fiber or something else .



wmcbrine
213 251 145 96

join:2002-12-30
Laurel, MD
kudos:1
reply to norbert26
said by norbert26:

Unlike a transparent change of fiber added someplace away from the home FiOS requires a new drop brought in, an outlet to be provided, access to MY computer .

There's really no need for them to access your computer.
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