dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
2555
share rss forum feed

brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1

ISP Monitoring

When internet service providers start to monitor our data. Will you guys be switching to the TOR browser for privacy reasons?

singerie3

join:2008-10-12
Saint-Constant, QC
probably not, it's slow as hell.

brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1
If you are download small .nzb or .torrent files it should not take long on TOR. Also if the ISP thinks you are download illegal material links. They will send you a notice. Not sure if they will take you to court though.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
You don't get busted for downloading .torrent files. You get busted when you connect to a tracker. As for .nzb, offshore sites and direct-connections means that the primary method of companies finding out who infringes on copyrights is gone. There is no means to intercept communication between you and another person (legally), and this is especially more difficult with SSL, so there is no advantage to using TOR.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK

brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1
We will see how deep they will go with packet inspection in two months.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
SSL should fix that.

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
reply to brianiscool
They are going to monitor torrents like they have always been doing..

It isn't the act of "downloading" that gets you in trouble. It is uploading material that is the big no-no. Torrents do both. Also torrents are easier to catch people. They just jump in the swarm and collect the IP addresses and send them off to their respective owners, the ISPs.

Get a VPN or a proxy server that doesn't log your details. Hard to find one of those though as most do keep some sort of details on your connection and maybe activity.

brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1
I don't use bitorrent don't like it much.

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
You don't have anything to worry about. The monitoring and six strikes plan are for torrents.

brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1
It still angers me internet service providers are going to this extent. I thought us a citizens of the United States has a right to privacy.

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
The ISPs are just relaying the information garnered from the outfits that work for the MPAA/RIAA to you. They don't track the torrents or anything. They keep track of the six strikes, re-educate you, and say bad boy/girl. Also to fight back, you have to pay $30 or something like that. Its all pretty shitty.

Anyway the music and movie industry people are using this as a foot hold on the ISPs. I guarantee you that once they get this thing going, a few years down the road they are going to enact even more draconian measures. See litigation is too expensive so why do that when you can go straight to the punishment.

newster

join:2011-09-26
reply to brianiscool
The result of IP address monitoring and ISP-imposed penalties, in addition to the continued attack on Usenet, could mean that the VPN business will soon be booming.


kingdome74
Let's Go Orange
Premium
join:2002-03-27
Syracuse, NY
kudos:5
reply to brianiscool
My understanding of torrents is you can't stop it from sharing and the second you share you breech the "law".
--
Hey Yankee fans - as an Oriole fan I sure am glad we lost only to have you get swept by Detroit.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
It doesn't matter. If you connect to a tracker, they snag your IP, regardless of status.

newster

join:2011-09-26

1 recommendation

reply to brianiscool
There are hacked versions of utorrent around that have the hardcoded uploading function disabled. While these clients might not technically violate the DMCA's prohibition on "distribution" and are thus legal, the cost of going to court to prove this can conceivably be exponentially higher than the $3000 demanded extortion ... uh, I mean settlement.

There's still a lot of unknowns remaining, since no Bittorrent lawsuits have ever gone to trial (perhaps by design) despite the tens of thousands of lawsuits or threatened lawsuits.

Regarding the DMCA's statutory minimum penalty of $750, it's not even been legally defined what specifically constitutes an instance of copyright infringement when a file is broken up into hundreds of pieces and only one or two might have been uploaded to the monitoring party.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to brianiscool
said by brianiscool:

When internet service providers start to monitor our data. Will you guys be switching to the TOR browser for privacy reasons?

I was under the impression that "Six Strikes" was about response to IP owner complaints; that the ISPs were not actively monitoring specific protocols. How would an ISP know if a torrent was illegally transferring IP unless the IP owner complained?

In any case, not a problem for me:

• I don't torrent MPAA/RIAA shit.
• My ISP is not participating in "Six Strikes".
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
How? Just like they have been doing. The copyright owner or proxy jumps into the swarm and collects IP addresses. The notices are then sent to the respective ISPs.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
said by sandman_1:

How? Just like they have been doing. The copyright owner or proxy jumps into the swarm and collects IP addresses. The notices are then sent to the respective ISPs.

As I was saying:
quote:
How would an ISP know if a torrent was illegally transferring IP unless the IP owner complained?

--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
Uhm maybe you need to read my comment again. I answered your question.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
said by sandman_1:

Uhm maybe you need to read my comment again. I answered your question.

My humblest apologies, sir; I forgot to include the [rhetorical]-[/rhetorical] flags. I thought the inclusion of the answer (bolded) was an obvious clue.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
So the question that you bolded was really an answer, to my answer, that you were rhetorically saying? If you say so...

Btw, there is no need to be sarcastic and abrasive.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
{Throws hands in air.}

I give up.

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
Maturity---You ought to give it a try sometime. You may like it.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
said by sandman_1:

Maturity

I prefer obstinate stupidity, thanks ...
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


S1R1US

join:2002-08-25
Clearwater, FL

1 edit
reply to brianiscool
Would the 6 Strikes still apply even for TOR users? My thoughts were that those ISPs were identifying pirates due to actual packet monitoring. If that's the case, would what's used to pirate really matter? Now sure if that's true though.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
said by S1R1US:

Would the 6 Strikes still apply even for TOR users? My thoughts were that those ISPs were identifying pirates due to actual packet monitoring. If that's the case, would what's used to pirate really matter? Now sure if that's true though.

The ISPs are not monitoring anything (well, not specifically looking for pirates), they are responding to third party DMCA complaints.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


S1R1US

join:2002-08-25
Clearwater, FL
A friend of mine from up north said he received a letter stating the exact names of the movies he was illegally pirating. He only uses piratebay. Are we saying 3rd parties are reporting users simply by watching what IP addresses are associated with a torrent tracker? I was under the impression that 6 Strikes ISPs are identifying this information on their own.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
said by S1R1US:

A friend of mine from up north said he received a letter stating the exact names of the movies he was illegally pirating. He only uses piratebay. Are we saying 3rd parties are reporting users simply by watching what IP addresses are associated with a torrent tracker? I was under the impression that 6 Strikes ISPs are identifying this information on their own.

What does Piratebay have to do with it? Or did you think that agents of the MPAA/RIAA are "badged", and easily made by them? All it takes is for an agent of the MPAA/RIAA to get hold of a tracker; and God knows there are plenty of IP Puritans who post here, surely such can get access to "private" trackers!

Out of a random stream of bits, how would the ISP know which are copyright protected, and which aren't?
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


S1R1US

join:2002-08-25
Clearwater, FL
As originally stated, I referenced TPB because that's the only method my friend uses to download non-legal content.

I'm not sure what you mean by 'agents of the mpaa/riaa are badged, and easily made by them'

Well I don't know that it would be a 'random stream of bits'. Don't most ISPs employ network monitoring tools such as Wireshark? Which is a system that not only tracks packets but can read and record each and every packet sent/received. It doesn't seem like a major feat to detect a movie name in headers.

It doesn't seem like it would be difficult to identify what content is illegal would it? I mean if someone is identified as downloading the new Avengers 2 movie only days after it's released...


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
TPB isn't the only source of .torrent trackers. And "private, by invitation" torrent sites aren't immune to penetration by copyright enforcement agents.

The agents of the MPAA/RIAA are hired ... hmm, I guess sorta like PIs. And they do their damnedest not to be obvious as such, so that they can insinuate themselves into private tracker sources.

Well, yes, ISPs can do DPI; but they probably move thousands of terabytes of data an hour on a national scale. And how will they distinguish an innocuous search for a movie from a torrent download? Google The Hurt Locker, then go to the resulting hit at 'www.imdb.com'. Do you know how many packet headers will carry that title?

The number of copyright works is phenomenal. Do you think it would be cost effective for the ISPs to implement the search algorithms to alert on them all or even some subset, distinguishing innocuous searches from BitTorrent trackers? The search effort would raise the cost of Internet services.

The MPAA/RIAA hire firms akin to PI and security operations to do the legwork, then fire off DMCA takedown notices to the ISPs which assign the IP addresses to the offending users.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum