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cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to ptrowski

Re: Generator Time!!!

said by ptrowski:

I would eventually have the transfer switch wired in as well.

Get an interlock if possible. Much easier to use, much cheaper to install. You just backfeed the existing panel and can use any of the circuits you have instead of choosing 6-10 you need most.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by cowboyro:

instead of choosing 6-10 you need most.

Yeah, that's a double edge sword.
Wait until your distracted wife tries to start the AC or the dryer

I have a fuse panel so I had no choice but to get a transfer switch (Which added a lot of room for extra circuits as a bonus). I made sure that no heavy load circuits were going to get fed by the generator. I just KNOW my wife would try to cook or use the dryer just because the lights are on.

As for "cheaper", well I saw some interlock kit prices. Some were as cheap as 50$, but some were as much as 150$. My transfer switch cost me 150$. Sure I needed breakers for it, but as I said, to me it was adding room for new circuits. My fuse panel only has 18 slots for 120V. My transfer switch added 24 more spaces.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
said by alkizmo:

said by cowboyro:

instead of choosing 6-10 you need most.

Yeah, that's a double edge sword.
Wait until your distracted wife tries to start the AC or the dryer

No problem. My generator starts a 2.5ton compressor. Dryer only takes 4500W or so on high heat.
said by alkizmo:

As for "cheaper", well I saw some interlock kit prices. Some were as cheap as 50$, but some were as much as 150$. My transfer switch cost me 150$.

I'd venture to guess that for most people there would be an electrician involved. Labor is expen$ive. Installing an interlock takes 30min total. Moving circuits from the panel to the transfer panel can be a surprise if the wires are too short.


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
Mind me asking what an interlock is?


dosdoxies
Premium
join:2004-12-15
Wallingford, PA
reply to cowboyro
Click for full size
said by cowboyro:

said by ptrowski:

I would eventually have the transfer switch wired in as well.

Get an interlock if possible. Much easier to use, much cheaper to install. You just backfeed the existing panel and can use any of the circuits you have instead of choosing 6-10 you need most.

In my case, I went with a Square D generator panel as I was out of spaces in my main panel and I was able to gain 6 spaces by giving up 2 in the main panel. This was cheaper and easier than changing the main panel. The circuits in my genny panel are heater (oil furnace), sump pump, freezer and refrigerator, kitchen (for microwave and coffer maker), and general lighting.
--
The more people I meet, the better I like my dogs.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to cowboyro
said by cowboyro:

I'd venture to guess that for most people there would be an electrician involved. Labor is expen$ive. Installing an interlock takes 30min total. Moving circuits from the panel to the transfer panel can be a surprise if the wires are too short.

I admit that you're right.

I required a LOT of hand holding from Whizkid when I installed my transfer switch. I did also have issues with wires being too short to move certain circuits (Situation easily remedied by Whizkid's solutions as well).

I feel it would be a piece of cake to do it again, but it isn't simple to do it the first time.

said by dosdoxies:

In my case, I went with a Square D generator panel as I was out of spaces in my main panel and I was able to gain 6 spaces by giving up 2 in the main panel. This was cheaper and easier than changing the main panel. The circuits in my genny panel are heater (oil furnace), sump pump, freezer and refrigerator, kitchen (for microwave and coffer maker), and general lighting.

You should have went for a bigger transfer switch if you wanted more circuit space

What does the big red button do? I wanna touch it.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to ptrowski
said by ptrowski:

Mind me asking what an interlock is?

It's a device that prevents having both the main and the generator breakers on at the same time. Look at the last picture of the OP, it's the metallic piece between the main breaker and the top-right breaker. I have exactly the same panel and interlock.


dosdoxies
Premium
join:2004-12-15
Wallingford, PA
reply to alkizmo
said by alkizmo:

You should have went for a bigger transfer switch if you wanted more circuit space

What does the big red button do? I wanna touch it.

What part don't you understand? I only needed a few more spaces so I gave up two in my main panel and gained 6 in the genny panel.
--
The more people I meet, the better I like my dogs.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by dosdoxies:

What part don't you understand? I only needed a few more spaces so I gave up two in my main panel and gained 6 in the genny panel.

Just saying...
Depending of the cost of a bigger panel, the extra space might become useful a few years down the line.

So what's the button for?


dosdoxies
Premium
join:2004-12-15
Wallingford, PA
said by alkizmo:

said by dosdoxies:

What part don't you understand? I only needed a few more spaces so I gave up two in my main panel and gained 6 in the genny panel.

Just saying...
Depending of the cost of a bigger panel, the extra space might become useful a few years down the line.

So what's the button for?

That's not a button. It's just a piece of red tape to denote that the breaker is utility fed. As far as the cost of the panel, I picked it up off ebay for like $30 new with the two main breakers in it.


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
reply to cowboyro
Thanks, was reading up on them in the meantime. I went to The Depot and was able to get the generator I linked to, transfe switches etc were all sold out.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to dosdoxies
said by dosdoxies:

That's not a button. It's just a piece of red tape to denote that the breaker is utility fed. As far as the cost of the panel, I picked it up off ebay for like $30 new with the two main breakers in it.

No no, not the tape, that red lighted circle at the bottom of the imagine... well, maybe it's just a red status light.

As for the transfer switch, okay for 30$ you can't go wrong.

said by ptrowski:

Thanks, was reading up on them in the meantime. I went to The Depot and was able to get the generator I linked to, transfe switches etc were all sold out.

Go to other hardware stores, you'll find one. I doubt those fly off the shelf as fast as generators. People buy generators before a storm, not knowing that a transfer switch would help.

zippoboy7

join:2006-06-18
USA
reply to dosdoxies
said by dosdoxies:

said by cowboyro:

said by ptrowski:

I would eventually have the transfer switch wired in as well.

Get an interlock if possible. Much easier to use, much cheaper to install. You just backfeed the existing panel and can use any of the circuits you have instead of choosing 6-10 you need most.

In my case, I went with a Square D generator panel as I was out of spaces in my main panel and I was able to gain 6 spaces by giving up 2 in the main panel. This was cheaper and easier than changing the main panel. The circuits in my genny panel are heater (oil furnace), sump pump, freezer and refrigerator, kitchen (for microwave and coffer maker), and general lighting.

I did basically the same thing only I just bought that little metal bracket that sits between the 2 breakers and put it in my sub-panel. I had to move a few circuits around but in the event of a prolonged outage I can always back-feed the main panel by removing the bracket and turning off the main if I need to do something like use the washer\dryer or run the AC. I have most of the kitchen (Lights, Microwave, Fridge and a few receptacles), Garage (Door Opener, a few receptacles and Freezer), Gas Furnace, Sumppump, all my network gear (FiOS ONT, Router, WiFi), my office (3 PCs, 1 Server and lights), the TV w/ STB in the family room and the whole house fan. All told more then enough to stay comfortable during an outage.

All that said, the last outage that we had was for about 1 hour during the last tropical storm that came through, the power company restored the fuse that was knocked out during the storm and when all was said and done we were the only block of houses as far as you could see in any direction with lights for a week. It just pays to have a generator ready to go, you will never loose power for a long period again. Sadly I have noticed more and more houses adding generators so with that trend I suspect the next one will be bad.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by zippoboy7:

Sadly I have noticed more and more houses adding generators so with that trend I suspect the next one will be bad.

Actually, people's personal trend when they buy a generator, is that they never get to need it

So ..... clear skies!


dosdoxies
Premium
join:2004-12-15
Wallingford, PA
reply to alkizmo
said by alkizmo:

said by dosdoxies:

That's not a button. It's just a piece of red tape to denote that the breaker is utility fed. As far as the cost of the panel, I picked it up off ebay for like $30 new with the two main breakers in it.

No no, not the tape, that red lighted circle at the bottom of the imagine... well, maybe it's just a red status light.

As for the transfer switch, okay for 30$ you can't go wrong.

That's a little neon light plugged into the receptacle for the sump pump. I can just glance over and make sure that the breaker for the pump is still on and hasn't tripped. I have one on my freezer receptacle as well.
--
The more people I meet, the better I like my dogs.