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antdude
A Ninja Ant
Premium,VIP
join:2001-03-25
United State
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

Which smartphone is the most secure?

»features.techworld.com/security/···-secure/

"There are unique differences and threats specific to each smartphone - so which is the best? ..."

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3

4 recommendations

Secure smartphone...

It's an oxymoron!


planet

join:2001-11-05
Oz
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Cox HSI

1 recommendation

reply to antdude
said by antdude:

"There are unique differences and threats specific to each smartphone - so which is the best? ..."

From what the article stated, I'd have to infer an IPhone that isn't jailbroke. No personal experience on this end...still using a "dumbphone". Mine runs Symbian but as said, not smart..don't even have a data plan for it. Talk & text only.

slajoh01

join:2005-04-23

4 edits

1 recommendation

No such thing as most secure.

As far as I know, the military has been issued a while back ago the Dell Streak Android Tablet/Phone. That had classified data to communicate through encrypted channels or gateway called the Good Mobility Suite (GMS) Server. And by the way, its NOT available to the general public...And thats perhaps as secure an Android phone can get.
More details should be here to read.
»gcn.com/articles/2012/01/05/disa···dod.aspx

But no smartphone or any other phone, or OS, or computer is secure out of the box. Same concept.

There are a few security apps out there that you can review for smartphones.


Name Game
Premium
join:2002-07-07
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:7
reply to antdude
Android Malware Surges Despite Google’s Efforts To Bounce Dodgy Apps Off Its Platform; F-Secure IDs 51,447 “Unique Samples” In Q3

»techcrunch.com/2012/11/05/androi···s-in-q3/


ashrc4
Premium
join:2009-02-06
australia
reply to antdude
said by antdude:

»features.techworld.com/security/···-secure/

"There are unique differences and threats specific to each smartphone - so which is the best? ..."

Unique to each smart phone. To clarify android has 4000 makes and models with patches provided by telco's who only after they decide to vet and push to the consumer do these updates even get offered.
That would make andriod the least secure.
Ms and iphone are easily the best at patching exploits.

The other problem with andriods is that if you have purchased a particular version then sequential updates do not carry forward.
Meaning if you started with 2.30 (not actual no.) then say update 2.32 , 2.33 2.4.
Your telco has to push every update to you. If you just apply 2.4, the other patches and their exploits, you will remain vulnerable to.

»BYO andriod for enterprise; 4000+ to patch. But can/do they..
--
Paradigm Shift beta test pilot. "Dying to defend one's small piece of suburb...Give me something global...STAT!


ashrc4
Premium
join:2009-02-06
australia
reply to slajoh01
said by slajoh01:

As far as I know, the military has been issued a while back ago the Dell Streak Android Tablet/Phone. That had classified data to communicate through encrypted channels or gateway called the Good Mobility Suite (GMS) Server. And by the way, its NOT available to the general public...

Also showing an interest in BlackBerry 10 now.

»www.theage.com.au/it-pro/busines···1tt.html

The stamp of approval gives confidence that data on smartphones running BB10 can be properly secured and encrypted.

Security over useability....different.


Dude111
An Awesome Dude
Premium
join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:12
reply to antdude

 

quote:
Which smartphone is the most secure?
None.... Your privacy is compromised ON ALL OF THEM!!


siljaline
I'm lovin' that double wide
Premium
join:2002-10-12
Montreal, QC
kudos:17
Reviews:
·Bell Sympatico
reply to antdude

Re: Which smartphone is the most secure?

The phone with the least amount of apps that require too many permissions and Ads that phone home, among others.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
reply to antdude
BlackBerry then Windows Phone

Because there's not enough users of them for anyone to care to hack them.

Also, Windows Mobile 6.5 :-p
--
CompTIA Network+ Certified

armed

join:2000-10-20
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to antdude
First define secure. Ok I admit that's an old rue but it has an application of sorts here.

As Dude111 sees it no device is "secure". I don't think that makes a lot of sense. He sees the world through tainted glass and a lot of paranoia.

On the other hand just what so far are the real issues of smart phones and data security. We know there are some virus problems but so far they are far from prevalent. There is a lack of evidence that any have had their financial information breached by smart phone interception of data. Cell phone tapping doesn't seem to be anymore in evidence than landlines. Cell Phone Internet data doesn't seem to be any easier to intercept than wired connections. Lastly password protection on web sites is not any worse when using the phone or wired connection.

So when "security" is defined as protection of data then "where's the beef?"

I'm willing to listen to evidence to the contrary but to me the issue is they only become dangerously insecure when you lose possession of them. Then Katie bar the door.

But I could be convinced otherwise.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
reply to TheMG
said by TheMG:

Secure smartphone...

It's an oxymoron!

+1

The one that has the battery pulled and is sitting in a locked drawer. Oh, that's right you can't pull the battery on most of them.
--
“Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.” ¯ Robert A. Heinlein

armed

join:2000-10-20
Reviews:
·Charter
It will be nice when we get past the silliness and get down to how to best secure smart phones.

Maybe this isn't the place yet to have that discussion despite the fact that it affects close to 100 million smart phones that are in use today. I like that antdude made this a subject. Lets hope we get better replies as to what is the real threat for these users and what can be done do to improve their security.

The wild proclamation that all is lost and there is no way to improve security for smart phones is wrong and just not all that helpful... in fact its a disservice x 100 million and growing.


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
You made a valid point. I guess we should distinguish security and privacy.

If by security you mean the ability to prevent hacking that maybe possible--up to a point.

As for privacy you have none with a cell phone. Bob et al listen in on and/or track them.

BTW I'm talking about consumer cell phones. Military and/or secure gummint phones are exempt from the above.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


HelpmeObiWan

join:2012-11-03
reply to antdude
hi,
the one that you can make proper configuration to increase security
depending on your specific needs.

blackberry, loved by corporations
windows 8, without VPN still !
iphone, sealed box, no sd removable card, maybe good, maybe bad
android, open source, vulnerable, but hey you can try building on security step by step. Try with a cheap android first 100 US$
I torture my alcatel 918 daily. Best 100 Euro I ever gave for a phone.

with android and iphone you can try endless security apps, also have vpn

never have a false sense of security no matter what phone you have on your hands and every day try for the best

armed

join:2000-10-20
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to StuartMW
said by StuartMW:

You made a valid point. I guess we should distinguish security and privacy.

If by security you mean the ability to prevent hacking that maybe possible--up to a point.

As for privacy you have none with a cell phone. Bob et al listen in on and/or track them.

BTW I'm talking about consumer cell phones. Military and/or secure gummint phones are exempt from the above.

I agree that cell phones can be tracked as compared to wired phones. But then again wired phones don't move much. But Bob knows if you have a wired phone and Bob knows how to get to it. I see real time tracking by Bob as a potential problem if Bob is going to ignore the Constitution IE not obtaining warrants first. On the other hand replicating your positions after the fact in an investigation does give Bob a tool he didn't have until one got a cell phone.

I am not aware that tapping is any more prevalent or easier on cell phones than on land lines.

On the issue of privacy I do have a question. Is a smart phone any more revealing than a dumb phone (IE real time tracking and line tapping)?

Now back to data security. It may well become a bigger problem in the future but almost everything I read today talks in terms like "might be", "may in the future be used for", "could become" etc. I don't see a lot of information that say that virus and hacking of cell phones is even close to the problem that is going on with normal computer use today.

To be truthful I am beginning to feel I'd be safer today doing my banking and etail shopping via cell phone as compared to using the computer.

But thanks for helping to separate out the issue between privacy VS data security on smart phones.


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
said by armed:

On the issue of privacy I do have a question. Is a smart phone any more revealing than a dumb phone (IE real time tracking and line tapping)?

Well most smartphones have built-in GPS which provides better positional accuracy than cell tower pinging (all most dumb phones have) but tracking is tracking whether to the foot or hundreds of feet. And as for being monitored (listening in) I don't think there's any difference.

That said Smartphones have built-in browsers and along with GPS tracking (through the browser or apps) is a privacy nightmare IMO. The Telco's along with Google/Apple collect vast amounts of information this way.

I don't have a Smartphone (refuse to) and although I did buy an Android device recently it is wi-fi only. I'm sure it phones home stuff to Google but probably no more than they already have from my PC's (same public IP after all).

Back to original discussion people sometimes lump privacy & security together when talking about "security". For example this forum is about both.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·HughesNet Satell..
·WesTex Connect
reply to armed
Actually, as far as voice privacy is concerned, a Smart Phone could potentially be the most secure of all of one installs a voice scrambling app (the person they're talking to would need it too).

Or, avoid the voice call all together and communicate voice over a secure data tunnel.
--
CompTIA Network+ Certified


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to antdude
Which smartphone is the most secure?

A: The one you smash with a sledgehammer then drown the pieces in acid.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


Dude111
An Awesome Dude
Premium
join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:12

 

Hehe couldnt agree more!


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
reply to AVD

Re: Which smartphone is the most secure?

Or... just don't buy one


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
said by StuartMW:

Or... just don't buy one

the phones are insecure by design, not by ownership.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
said by AVD:

the phones are insecure by design, not by ownership.

True. But if you don't have one some other poor smuck does, you're (more) secure and he/she isn't
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
if my contact information is in someone else's phone, what's the difference? If my voicemails and sms messages are being stored and indexed, again, what's the difference?
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
I guess we're not communicating.

I'm saying just don't have a smartphone whether you own it or not. Just say no.

Let other people (strangers) have them. If they don't know the issues then too bad for them.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

1 edit
said by StuartMW:

I guess we're not communicating.

I'm saying just don't have a smartphone whether you own it or not. Just say no.

Let other people (strangers) have them. If they don't know the issues then too bad for them.

I'm afraid you are missing my point. Even if I use a pots line, my communications to someone with a smartphone is compromised.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
said by AVD:

Even if I use a pots line, my communications to someone with a smartphone is compromising.

Ahhh. Well considering Bob listens into everything you're SOL unless you use some private prearranged codewords etc.

"The cat is on the mat. I repeat. The cat is on the mat."
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
I'm not worried about BOb WRT smartphones, its the corporate types that exploit smartphones.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
I'm guessing you have an employer supplied (and mandated?) smartphone.

Most employers claim ownership and/or right to monitor all email/texts/etc. Not sure they can monitor voice calls though.

If that is the case I wouldn't do a Petraeus.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!

armed

join:2000-10-20
Reviews:
·Charter
said by StuartMW:

I'm guessing you have an employer supplied (and mandated?) smartphone.

Most employers claim ownership and/or right to monitor all email/texts/etc. Not sure they can monitor voice calls though.

If that is the case I wouldn't do a Petraeus.

As an interesting aside. Did you see how Petraeus and his friend hid their emails? It was rather cute. They set up a throwaway email account and basically left the drafted emails to each other in the "Drafts" folder of the account. So the emails were never sent and were never on either of their email accounts or computers.

Now how the hell the FBI figured that out would be interesting. They must have had access to web site history of each computer and followed the crumbs. But still they had to get into the account. So did the girl friend give it up or did they hack it?

To make matters worse the FBI got involved because the third women was a friend of an agent and she went to him supposedly claiming she was being threatened. The FBI guy seems to have abused his powers and began to investigate the "threats" when it appears no threats were made . It was more like "I know about you" and 'Do you want your husband to know what you are doing". That's worth FBI interest?

I could not care less about Pretaeus and who if any he was banging... but I care a lot about FBI investigating non crimes based on friendships. That's enough to make me a tin hat for sure.

My apologies for being off topic ... but you brought it up