dslreports logo
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc
Search Topic:
uniqs
908
share rss forum feed

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC

[Internet] Is Bell Business Fibre Available?

Hi,

I'm trying to find a reliable internet solution for an organization that I volunteer for. They have a camp property near Mille Isles Quebec that is currently using satellite internet and they constantly have problems.

On a recent visit to sort out some IT issues, I noticed that the utility poles had fibre optic cables installed and tagged with "Caution Bell Fibre Optic Cable". I called up the Bell Business number and they told me no service is available.

I find it hard to believe that no service is available at all, since the fibre optic lines have been clearly installed and have been installed for several years. What can I do or who can I call to get an answer other than "My computer tells me nothing is available"? Surely Bell can offer some sort of service if the fibre optic lines are across the street.

urbang33k

join:2010-02-13
Canada
kudos:1
Well, while I cant say with any degree of certainty in your specific situation as I don't know the area but, Bell has had a fibre network in place for a long long time. It could be a back-bone of sorts connecting central offices together, or it could be a feed for a remote in the area. If this is the type of fibre up there, than it is not for consumer retail.

If you wanted to go and take a look at the poles these are the types of terminals we are using for consumer installs. If one of these types of terminals is present within a few pole spans of your customer than it MIGHT MIGHT MIGHT MIGHT be available:
»catalog.corning.com/CableSystems ··· tems_web
--
Opinions and ideas expressed in my post are my own and in no way represent those of Bell Canada Enterprises, Bell Canada, Bell TV, Bell Internet, Bell Mobility, Bell Technical Solutions, Expertech, or any other partners under the BCE umbrella.

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
I actually followed the line from one end to another. It seems to stop at a silver coloured splice box (I have photos of the splices at home and will post one this evening.) at one end of the property. No connections to any equipment. Following it back to the main road, it looks to splice into the main trunk lines. Between the main road and the end of the line, I only saw the silver splice boxes. It looks like no equipment has been installed at all and this is a fibre drop to nowhere. I'm sure for the right price, Bell can hook something up.

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
Click for full size
Here is a shot of the splice boxes along the line.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to thestealth
said by thestealth:

Hi,

I'm trying to find a reliable internet solution for an organization that I volunteer for. They have a camp property near Mille Isles Quebec that is currently using satellite internet and they constantly have problems.

The old Scouts Canada camp at Tamracouta?
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
said by DKS:

The old Scouts Canada camp at Tamracouta?

Actually yes. The camp is now attracting a lot of outside groups and these extra rentals are helping the camp from closing down.

With all the new technology and people being constantly connected, having internet available is a good selling point to attract more rentals. It's a pain in the butt when you get a call on a rainy Saturday afternoon saying the satellite internet is down (yet again) and group X needs it now, what can we do.

Having seen fibre optic cable within a few feet of the main building gave me hope for a better solution, but Bell is giving me the run around. *sigh*

I was hoping posting here would help be get a more reliable answer other than the generic "The computer tells me we can't offer you anything" answer.


Kardinal
Dei Gratia Regina
Premium,Mod
join:2001-02-04
N of 49th
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·Bell Sympatico
reply to thestealth
Fibre optic cable on the poles means that it's been hung there but it doesn't mean that there's been anything installed to "light it up" at the Bell end of things. It's there, but it's 'dark' until they decide there is a business case to lighting it and providing a working junction point that they can then provide service to your camp from.

It's not a run around per se; you're seeing part of a network and assuming that it's lit and ready for use when in fact it probably isn't if this is the middle of the countryside.
--
"Pro amicis mortui amicis vivimus" (We live in the hearts of friends for whom we died)
the inscription on the Memorial in the Canadian War Cemetery at Groesbeek, the Netherlands

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
Not quite the middle of no where.... Whats the point of spending money to let fibre sit there doing nothing for years on end? Surely any ROI (however small it may be) is better than none at all.

If Bell will not light it up, is there a possibility of a 3rd party leasing the line and lighting it up?


Kardinal
Dei Gratia Regina
Premium,Mod
join:2001-02-04
N of 49th
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·Bell Sympatico
Putting fibre on a pole isn't that expensive in the grand scheme of things, as the cabling itself isn't that costly nor is the act of stringing it. Where it gets expensive is lighting it up, as you have to have the "receiver" at the Bell end of it to be able to light it up, and then you have to connect that into the rest of the network. Fibre is just a hauling medium, like copper; it's building the rest of the network infrastructure that gets costly, so stringing it up as part of a big build is a small investment that could sit for years until it is determined that there is an ROI on the rest of the build that is worthwhile.

Any 3rd party would have the same business case to build: is there enough potential money in the entire area to justify the expense of building a local fibre network? I don't know the area exactly, so I can't say, but it is a rural area so it could be hard to justify 10s of thousands of dollars of equipment and time to build it for the return they could make on it.
--
"Pro amicis mortui amicis vivimus" (We live in the hearts of friends for whom we died)
the inscription on the Memorial in the Canadian War Cemetery at Groesbeek, the Netherlands

HeadSpinning
MNSi Internet

join:2005-05-29
Windsor, ON
kudos:6
reply to thestealth
said by thestealth:

Not quite the middle of no where.... Whats the point of spending money to let fibre sit there doing nothing for years on end? Surely any ROI (however small it may be) is better than none at all.

If Bell will not light it up, is there a possibility of a 3rd party leasing the line and lighting it up?

The cable may only have inter-CO traffic on it, and not be designated for use as distribution fibre. Bell will typically use SONET optical transport gear for inter-switch trunking, and Ethernet media converters for customer facing connections. In areas where they do PON, the have a PON terminal at the CO. The CO in question may not have such equipment.
--
MNSi Internet - »www.mnsi.net

connor79

join:2011-11-02
reply to thestealth
Just sent you a private message as we are a Bell Canada partner so I'd be happy to help.

Just for everyone else's benefit, fibre is used for many applications so just seeing it there doesn't mean it's available. There's really 3 uses that would directly impact someone right now:

1) DSL service. This is best effort and distance based. Further you are from the CO the less speeds you get. To solve that, Bell runs fibre into the neighbourhood or into the node (FTTN) and you are basically connecting from your office to that node versus the central office, allowing 25Mbps download and 7Mbps upload. It uses copper lines from your office to the node as the last mile connection. It also means someone across the street might connect to a closer node and be able to get 25Mbps, where you connect to a different one and can only get 10Mbps. Repair times are 24 hour SLA, or you can pay for express 8 hour. It's always best effort and "up to". It supports 1 static IP unless you go with ADSL which is 6MBps or 16MBps and supports 5 using a Cisco router. We always tell people this is like Canada Post. You mail a letter and it might get there tomorrow or might not get there at all, it's just best effort.

2) Dedicated fibre Internet. This is the premium service that most businesses use when Internet is critical. This is fibre run directly to your business. It's always symmetrical, so 10MBps upload and 10MBps download, and can go from 3MBps up to 1000Mbps. It's dedicated bandwidth, not a best effort service (until it hits the Internet as nothing is guaranteed on the Internet). Has a 4 hour SLA, credits for outages, has better equipment like Cisco routers with as many Static IPs as you need. We say this is like the courier. You pay a lot more for it ($1000+ per month) but it's a much higher end service for businesses running VoIP and needing dedicated access.

3) Lastly, there's our FTTB, this is similar to 2 where we run fibre to you. However it's also a best effort service like DSL in 1. It does up to 150Mbps down and 50MBps up, but is still best effort. It's what will eventually replace DSL. It's on pilot in most areas of Quebec and slowly moving into Ontario. I work with buildings in Ontario on actually getting it to them for their tenants. It's similar in that the repair times are 24 hours, it's not dedicated or guaranteed etc.

So having said all that, when you call into Bell, they can only check for 1 and 3 above. The system will say what you can or can't get. For option 2, only partners can sell that as it needs a facility check, takes around 10 days to check if fibre is in the area and the cost to get it. Now the good thing is if that was a service you were looking at, having fibre in the area is good, because even if it's not run to your building yet, the cost to get it to you would be low and might not cost you anything. Again calling into Bell they cannot check these types of things, they can only do smaller services like DSL. As mentioned in my PM though please let me know if you want me to dig further for you (or anyone else for that matter) as I'd be happy to help.

As mentioned we are a Bell Canada partner (www.cloudblue.ca) and we are great at getting low pricing and working for you with Bell's finance department to match competitor pricing for fibre etc. Feel free to let me know if we can assist at all.

By the way we aren't a reseller or anything, all services, pricing, billing etc is by Bell, we are part of the Bell External Sales Channel.