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Kardinal
Dei Gratia Regina
Premium,Mod
join:2001-02-04
N of 49th
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·Bell Sympatico
reply to thestealth

Re: [Internet] Is Bell Business Fibre Available?

Fibre optic cable on the poles means that it's been hung there but it doesn't mean that there's been anything installed to "light it up" at the Bell end of things. It's there, but it's 'dark' until they decide there is a business case to lighting it and providing a working junction point that they can then provide service to your camp from.

It's not a run around per se; you're seeing part of a network and assuming that it's lit and ready for use when in fact it probably isn't if this is the middle of the countryside.
--
"Pro amicis mortui amicis vivimus" (We live in the hearts of friends for whom we died)
the inscription on the Memorial in the Canadian War Cemetery at Groesbeek, the Netherlands

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
Not quite the middle of no where.... Whats the point of spending money to let fibre sit there doing nothing for years on end? Surely any ROI (however small it may be) is better than none at all.

If Bell will not light it up, is there a possibility of a 3rd party leasing the line and lighting it up?


Kardinal
Dei Gratia Regina
Premium,Mod
join:2001-02-04
N of 49th
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·Bell Sympatico
Putting fibre on a pole isn't that expensive in the grand scheme of things, as the cabling itself isn't that costly nor is the act of stringing it. Where it gets expensive is lighting it up, as you have to have the "receiver" at the Bell end of it to be able to light it up, and then you have to connect that into the rest of the network. Fibre is just a hauling medium, like copper; it's building the rest of the network infrastructure that gets costly, so stringing it up as part of a big build is a small investment that could sit for years until it is determined that there is an ROI on the rest of the build that is worthwhile.

Any 3rd party would have the same business case to build: is there enough potential money in the entire area to justify the expense of building a local fibre network? I don't know the area exactly, so I can't say, but it is a rural area so it could be hard to justify 10s of thousands of dollars of equipment and time to build it for the return they could make on it.
--
"Pro amicis mortui amicis vivimus" (We live in the hearts of friends for whom we died)
the inscription on the Memorial in the Canadian War Cemetery at Groesbeek, the Netherlands

HeadSpinning
MNSi Internet

join:2005-05-29
Windsor, ON
kudos:6
reply to thestealth
said by thestealth:

Not quite the middle of no where.... Whats the point of spending money to let fibre sit there doing nothing for years on end? Surely any ROI (however small it may be) is better than none at all.

If Bell will not light it up, is there a possibility of a 3rd party leasing the line and lighting it up?

The cable may only have inter-CO traffic on it, and not be designated for use as distribution fibre. Bell will typically use SONET optical transport gear for inter-switch trunking, and Ethernet media converters for customer facing connections. In areas where they do PON, the have a PON terminal at the CO. The CO in question may not have such equipment.
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MNSi Internet - »www.mnsi.net