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Jaber

join:2007-07-07
Mount Prospect, IL

Drywall - Joint Compound On Cold(ish) Days?

Greetings,

I've been thinking of applying the 2nd coat of joint compound, on my spare time in the garage. Seeing as I have some free time coming up this month, I'd like to do something useful and get a head start. I won't be able to cover the entire garage, but I'd like to do sections at a time. This way, by summer time, it can be done with 3rd coat, primed and painted. Currently, the garage is taped and has one coat. The garage is also attached. Looking at the specs for the compounds, they recommend 50F and up.

Currently the temperatures around here are high of 50's, sometimes 40's, with low 30's at night.

Should I just not risk it and wait until spring to start on this project? Or would it be ok to do certain sections, as long as temps during the day time remain above freezing temperature?

Thanks for any input!



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12

I'd go put up the Christmas lights instead and just leave the drywall until Spring.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.



SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Jaber

If you're willing to rent a salamander for the days you are mudding, then you can go ahead. But I wouldn't chance it otherwise.. wait until spring.



Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2
reply to Jaber

Go for a small space heater. It'll do the trick.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Jaber

It will take much longer to dry, but as long as the temps remain above freezing, you should be OK.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to Juggernaut

said by Juggernaut:

Go for a small space heater. It'll do the trick.

This
You need to find a way to keep temps above 50F, a salamander is a bit overkill

Anyway you only need to keep it warm when it's drying.
So if you do some work on weekends, then you can turn off the heat on Tuesday evening.

Jaber

join:2007-07-07
Mount Prospect, IL
reply to Jaber

Thanks for the reply everyone. I'll just wait till spring then. Since there isn't a rush to finish it, I'd rather go about it the correct way.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

You need to find a way to keep temps above 50F, a salamander is a bit overkill

A big one might be overkill. But a smaller one might not be. We don't know the size of the garage. Plus, depending on what he intends to use the garage, the heater might be nice to have anyways. I've done many woodworking projects in heated garages in the middle of winter. And I loth having to do a significant auto repair in the middle of winter in a cold garage.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to Jaber

Don't use the pre-mixed compound, use the setting type. Won't shrink, doesn't need to "dry". And you can do sections as you wish, you just mix the amount that you're going to use. It's also far less dependent on temperature and humidity.



cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

said by cowboyro:

Don't use the pre-mixed compound, use the setting type. Won't shrink, doesn't need to "dry". And you can do sections as you wish, you just mix the amount that you're going to use. It's also far less dependent on temperature and humidity.

+1
This is what "mudders" use; comes in a bag, can mix what you need as you go. Actually "dries" quick compared to pre-mix buckets (Blue/Green/Purple).
Also with tape, I read a good article on paper and fiberglass.
(see Tauton Press Fine Home Building lastest issue).
A good book for folks doing drywall is by Myron Ferguson

(I don't work for Taunton Press. I just find their material and books top notch for home builder/project/rehab)
--
Splat


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to SwedishRider

said by SwedishRider:

If you're willing to rent a salamander for the days you are mudding, then you can go ahead. But I wouldn't chance it otherwise.. wait until spring.

You don't want to use a salamander for heat when doing drywall. First they put moisture into the air, which is the exact opposite of what you want when doing drywall. Second they put a thin layer of soot on the walls that makes it harder for the primer to bond properly. I learned these lessons the hard way. Drywall sub finished a new construction house and we went in to do all the finish carpentry and flooring. We ran a salamander out in the garage for a month to keep us warm while we worked out there cutting wood flooring, tile and all the trim. After we were done the house took primer and paint just fine, but when the garage was primed it all bubbled up and peeled off the walls. So I never made that mistake again, electric heat only after the drywall is hung.


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1

said by Ken:

said by SwedishRider:

If you're willing to rent a salamander for the days you are mudding, then you can go ahead. But I wouldn't chance it otherwise.. wait until spring.

You don't want to use a salamander for heat when doing drywall. First they put moisture into the air, which is the exact opposite of what you want when doing drywall. Second they put a thin layer of soot on the walls that makes it harder for the primer to bond properly. I learned these lessons the hard way. Drywall sub finished a new construction house and we went in to do all the finish carpentry and flooring. We ran a salamander out in the garage for a month to keep us warm while we worked out there cutting wood flooring, tile and all the trim. After we were done the house took primer and paint just fine, but when the garage was primed it all bubbled up and peeled off the walls. So I never made that mistake again, electric heat only after the drywall is hung.

Interesting! I never knew that. When I built my place, I didn't have heat hooked up yet but the mudders needed to get rolling, and it was getting cold outside at that time of the year. Something that looked like a big metal canister was brought in and hooked to a propane tank outside of the building. Once the mudders finished, they'd fire up that canister and let an open flame burn overnight, making sure that temps were hot enough to keep the mud from freezing. Worked very well actually! I would have thought a salamander would do pretty much the same thing.


dosdoxies
Premium
join:2004-12-15
Wallingford, PA
reply to Jaber

The salamanders I remember all used kerosene.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by dosdoxies:

The salamanders I remember all used kerosene.

Google propane along with salamander, torpedo, or reddy. There are a bunch of different options both with high velocity forced air as with lower velocity fans.