dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
721
share rss forum feed


FF4m3

@bhn.net

Apple Now Owns the Page Turn

From the NY Times:

If you want to know just how broken the patent system is, just look at patent D670,713, filed by Apple and approved this week by the United States Patent Office.

This design patent, titled, “Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface,” gives Apple the exclusive rights to the page turn in an e-reader application.

Yes, that’s right. Apple now owns the page turn.

The patent to own the page turn was just one of 38 patents granted to Apple this week. Among the others there was a “Skin tone aware color boost for cameras,” “Location-based categorical information services” and a “Consistent backup of electronic information.”



beerbum
Premium
join:2000-05-06
Reading, PA
kudos:1
from reading the article it appears the patent is for a specific animation sequence used to display a page turn, not the page turn idea itself..

that's how I read it, but then again IANAL.. I'm sure some lawyer will try to argue otherwise..

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
That's how everyone saw many "Organizer" type programs did it 20 years ago, including one that I've developed on Win 3.11, BTW... So, what's new here?

Patent system in the US is completely broken and it serves only purpose of generating money to the US Patent Office itself and to companies, hiring big departments of high paid lawyers and willing to sue everyone around and making big money in the process. For the latter it's a new form of business now, business of making money form litigations... It's absurd.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...


chrisretusn
Retired
Premium
join:2007-08-13
Philippines
kudos:1
reply to FF4m3
A perfect example of patents gone wrong.
--
Chris
Living in Paradise!!


FF4m3

@bhn.net
reply to OZO
said by OZO:

Patent system in the US is completely broken and it serves only purpose of generating money to the US Patent Office itself and to companies, hiring big departments of high paid lawyers and willing to sue everyone around and making big money in the process. For the latter it's a new form of business now, business of making money form litigations...

Agreed.

Patent trolling has become significant attempted revenue streams for such companies as Apple and Microsoft.

Wall Street Journal - Patent 'Troll' Tactics Spread

Ars Technica - Patent Trolls Cost Economy $29 Billion Yearly

TechDirt - The Dark Patent Troll Rises: Now 40% Of All Patent Litigation


Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to FF4m3
The patent office has become the very thing it was meant to defend against, time to just blow up the patent office and declare all existing patents null and void and move on.

The secondary effects of that would be incredible, all that offshore intellectual property that companies use to move money out of the country, smack.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool


siljaline
I'm lovin' that double wide
Premium
join:2002-10-12
Montreal, QC
kudos:18
Reviews:
·Bell Sympatico
reply to FF4m3
Ridiculous Apple granted patent for artificially turning book pages

quote:
The U.S. Patent Office recently granted Apple a patent for the functionality of turning a page on an e-reader application.

That’s right, you read that correctly. Apple now owns digital page turning, aka patent D670713, which is officially titled “Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface.” Theoretically, this means Apple can now wage a legal war against companies that make apps that compete with iBooks, such as Google Books.

Apple, which filed the patent application nearly a year ago, claimed that its own page turning animation was unique to other e-reader applications. Apple’s page turning mimics how you’d turn a physical page from the edge of the paper, slowly pulling it back to see the following page. By contrast, the e-reader application from Google mimics turning by pressing your finger in the middle of the page to advance to the following page. Personally, I like Google’s method better, but I at least see the contrast.
Article

--
Donne-moi des peanuts, j’m’en va te chanter "Alouette" sans fausse note