dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1099
share rss forum feed


PeeWee
Premium
join:2001-10-21
Madera, CA

VOIP suggestions

I have a cable connection 6-1(fast enough for me). Is it good enough to think about using VOIP of some sort and ridding us of ATT altogether? If so would Comcast be the best or can I save even more money with another way of setting it up and still be reasonably reliable? Opinions greatly appreciated.
--
Iphone. Helping computer illiteracy become popular since 2007


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
Check out this previous thread about CDV/VoIP for some info/ideas: »[Rant] I want to add Voice but they won't let me!


NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
said by telcodad:

Check out this previous thread about CDV/VoIP for some info/ideas: »[Rant] I want to add Voice but they won't let me!

Well, as long as you are recommending an open ended thread which had no posted resolution, perhaps we should also post the followup thread (which also had no posted resolution): »[Connectivity] Trying to use PhonePower on Comcast HSI - not so
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
reply to PeeWee
said by PeeWee:

I have a cable connection 6-1(fast enough for me). Is it good enough to think about using VOIP of some sort and ridding us of ATT altogether? If so would Comcast be the best or can I save even more money with another way of setting it up and still be reasonably reliable? Opinions greatly appreciated.

I used to use two Vonage lines on a Covad 1536/384 kbps DSL connection, so in theory a 6/1 mbps connection should not be a problem for using a non-Comcast VoIP service (although you may need to either use a router with a good QoS feature, or put your VoIP ATA in front of the router). Comcast operates its VoIP on a separate cable channel, so there is no problem with QoS.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


PeeWee
Premium
join:2001-10-21
Madera, CA
reply to PeeWee
Anyone have experience with OOMA, free (after purchase) sounds real good.
--
Iphone. Helping computer illiteracy become popular since 2007


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to PeeWee
I would go with the Xfinity Voice offer. Even though it is more expensive than Vonage or Magic Jack, CDV has better quality of service and has a battery backup to cover brief power outages.

My alarm company says the VoIP offerings from the cable providers (Comcast and Charter in this area) are more reliable for transmitting alarm signals than other VoIP providers (such as Vonage and Magic Jack) and they will not monitor alarms using non-facilities based VoIP providers. I personally have Comcast for home phone and I have no problems with my burglar alarm transmitting signals to the alarm company.

You are better off using a facilities based VoIP provider as they are more reliable. You don't want a no dial tone situation when a child is not breathing or your mother is having a heart attack. Cell phones should not be relied on as a primary means of emergency communications as they are not answered locally and go to the state police who transfer the call to the local dispatch center. And they need you to provide exact location information (try thinking clearly enough to give your address when you have a child not breathing). Even though cell phones do transmit location information to 911, very few jurisdictions have the capacity to receive the information and have to contact the cell provider for the information which will delay emergency response.

I also heard about the story of someone using a service similar to Vonage and they call 911 because of a child not breathing and they got transferred 6 times and by the time the paramedics got there, it was too late.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
If you care about reliability, you'd get a copper landline. If you care about price, you'd get Ooma or something like that. CDV just doesn't have a place in either.

Doug45

join:2002-08-27
Wheaton, IL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to PeeWee
I am using Ooma on 12 down/2 up cable, but previously had DSL 1.5 down/0.768 up (minus overhead). Once I got the router QoS properly set up it worked (and works) fine. You have plenty of bandwidth with 6 down/1 up - but would need to make sure you set up QoS rules on your router.

Note: Newer Ooma units do collect tax and fee (911) payments, so although the transport is free, you will still have monthly payments.


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
reply to PeeWee
Great question, also check out »VOIP Tech Chat


gwbuffalo

join:2001-12-08
Mokena, IL
reply to PeeWee
I have been using Ooma for over a year and highly recommend it. Had brief issues with it stuttering and echoing, but that was tracked down to a faulty router. Once that was replaced and Ooma was in the DMZ (you can also hook it up before your router) Ooma has performed just as good, if not better, than Comcast's own voice offering. I pay for the extra features (multi-line / multi-ring / rings my cell when my home phone rings / etc) so I pay about $14.00 a month with taxes which I am pretty happy with.
--
»twitter.com/darrenoneill »alt-this.com


PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to BiggA
said by BiggA:

If you care about reliability, you'd get a copper landline. If you care about price, you'd get Ooma or something like that. CDV just doesn't have a place in either.

I disagree. I find that Comcast CDV has been absolutely reliable. Yes, if your power goes out, you will have a shorter run-time than with a landline...assuming that it does not go out, and I have had loss of landline service a couple of times due to outages in recent years).

Obviously, based on location, YMMV with either a landline or CDV.

Price, I do agree on. There are cheaper options that have varying degrees of call quality as well as reliability...but that is the price for saving some bucks.
--
Deeds, not words

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
Soon as the power or cable goes down, it's dead. Meanwhile, if the power is out, the lines are down, all hell has broken loose, AT&T is still cranking on battery power with diesel to recharge them. There is nothing as reliable as copper.

During Irene, the power was out for nearly a week here, and AT&T was cranking the whole time off of diesel power. Comcast was out for about another week before they finally bothered to restore service. Somehow, the power stayed up during Sandy, but a week later the power was down. Again, CDV wouldn't have worked, but AT&T was cranking along.

VOIP is also tied to cable, so it has the same reliability as CDV... i.e. not much.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
CDV has fewer points of failure with Vonage and Ooma, there are many more points of failure such as more pieces of CPE and commercial Internet back haul. CDV only needs the link between the headend and the modem.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
When the last mile is the least reliable part of it all, they are, in practicality, they have the same miserably unreliable track record. Copper landlines are the only reliable things during a storm. Or cell phones for most people. For us, however, we're using a Microcell, and during the summer, the macrocell signal is barely good enough to make a phone call or use really slow data, so when Comcast goes down, those are pretty crippled too.


battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to BiggA
Just hope their fuel pumps are not in the basement.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
Not out here in CT. In lower Manhattan, just about everything was hopeless once the flood waters entered the underground utility tunnels. Ironic, since they were buried the late 1800's to avoid snow and ice damage.