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graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to Da Geek Kid

Re: [Connectivity] MAC Address Scam?

said by Da Geek Kid:

This is easily fixed... You can log in to the modem and clone a MAC and the only MAC the ISP will see is the cloned MAC. This should be absolutely no issue... I have been doing this since the early DSL days and still do it all the fam ISPs... you can create a MAC with a simple script, google it.

The issue is resolved.

You sound pretty sure of yourself here. Log into the cable modem and change its MAC? Provide a screen shot of this. I'm from Missouri - show me.


Da Geek Kid

join:2003-10-11
::1
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Callcentric

said by graysonf:

said by Da Geek Kid:

This is easily fixed... You can log in to the modem and clone a MAC and the only MAC the ISP will see is the cloned MAC. This should be absolutely no issue... I have been doing this since the early DSL days and still do it all the fam ISPs... you can create a MAC with a simple script, google it.

The issue is resolved.

You sound pretty sure of yourself here. Log into the cable modem and change its MAC? Provide a screen shot of this. I'm from Missouri - show me.

Ok, so wanna get technical. You set the cable modem to a bridge mode. Than you set up a router behind it that talks directly with ISP.


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

A basic cable modem is a bridge.

It has two interfaces. One is coax and has the MAC address that is used to authorize the service by the ISP.

The other interface is ethernet. It has different MAC address but it is not involved with authorizing the modem.

The PC or router you plug into the modem also has a MAC address. But this one is also not involved with authorizing service. It is tied to the assigned public IP address though. The assigned by DHCP public IP address will not change under ordinary circumstances. If you wish to change your public IP address, then you can either change the ethernet card in the PC, spoof a new, different MAC address in the OS TCP/IP stack, or change the MAC address on the router's WAN interface.

There is nothing you can do with your router or PC or its ethernet card that changes the MAC address on the coax side of the modem that is seen by the cable company and is used to authorize the modem. PERIOD.



NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

4 edits
reply to Da Geek Kid

said by Da Geek Kid:

said by graysonf:

said by Da Geek Kid:

This is easily fixed... You can log in to the modem and clone a MAC and the only MAC the ISP will see is the cloned MAC. This should be absolutely no issue... I have been doing this since the early DSL days and still do it all the fam ISPs... you can create a MAC with a simple script, google it.

The issue is resolved.

You sound pretty sure of yourself here. Log into the cable modem and change its MAC? Provide a screen shot of this. I'm from Missouri - show me.

Ok, so wanna get technical. You set the cable modem to a bridge mode. Than you set up a router behind it that talks directly with ISP.

That qualification (which almost any regular poster in this forum knows) would have nothing to do with Comcast refusing to accept the cable modem CMTS MAC address for the OP's cable gateway. The cable modem's CMTS MAC address has nothing whatsoever to do with the MAC address of the device(s) connected to it. Comcast (or any DOCSIS compliant cable internet provider) uses the modem's CMTS MAC address to register the modem for their service, not the MAC address of some device that is attached to the modem. It has been over a decade since any DOCSIS compliant cable internet provider has used the MAC address of a device attached behind the cable modem for user authentication (and even when an attached device's MAC address was used, the cable modem's WAN MAC address was also required).

The attached device MAC address is used however by the DHCP server, but that has nothing to do with activating a modem for a particular customer's account. I currently have 5 such attached devices (as shown below), and each gets its own IP address information from Comcast's DHCP server. But those devices can change any time I wish to change them, and the only MAC address that Comcast cares about for providing service is the cable modems' CMTS MAC address. In fact over the past several days I have been making some local network changes that caused those attached device MAC addresses to change many times (and it had no effect on Comcast allowing or disallowing my modem to connect to their network).




How about you do a little bit of research before you post such nonsense and claim that "The issue is resolved".
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