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Johnny
Fed Up. Bye.
Premium
join:2001-06-27
Atlanta, GA
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3 recommendations

reply to jaykaykay

Re: A good reminder for all...



jaykaykay
4 Ever Young
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1 recommendation

First of all, I don't believe much of what Snopes has to offer. That being said, I know that the gym example can happen, for a fact, as it happened here in one that we belong. Just because Snopes says it isn't true, don't rely upon that site to lead you.


goalieskates
Premium
join:2004-09-12
land of big

1 recommendation

said by jaykaykay:

First of all, I don't believe much of what Snopes has to offer. That being said, I know that the gym example can happen, for a fact, as it happened here in one that we belong. Just because Snopes says it isn't true, don't rely upon that site to lead you.

What she said. Snopes has its uses, but there are times it misses badly.


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
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join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18

1 recommendation

reply to jaykaykay
said by jaykaykay:

First of all, I don't believe much of what Snopes has to offer. That being said, I know that the gym example can happen, for a fact, as it happened here in one that we belong. Just because Snopes says it isn't true, don't rely upon that site to lead you.

But Snopes didn't say it isn't true. You must have read something else. I read it said "POSSIBLE, BUT NOT COMMON" which means it does happen but very rarely.
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?


MsTerra
Callipygian
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Nerdvana
kudos:2
reply to goalieskates
said by goalieskates:

said by jaykaykay:

First of all, I don't believe much of what Snopes has to offer. That being said, I know that the gym example can happen, for a fact, as it happened here in one that we belong. Just because Snopes says it isn't true, don't rely upon that site to lead you.

What she said. Snopes has its uses, but there are times it misses badly.

I've been on the internets for about 25 years, have seen a lot of multi-forwarded emails, and have long found snopes to be a good source of information for these things.

Certainly in this case, it is. Scene 1, for example - it is absolutely possible to dispute charges or make a fraud report based on a credit card statement (how do you suppose we did this before we had online access to our accounts?), and it is true that by law the maximum consumer liability for fraudulent charges is $50. (Many banks offer cards with $0 liability, as mine does.) It makes no sense that the victim in this case would be on the hook for $9K of fraudulent charges, unless you want to turn this into a cautionary tale of the consumer knowing his rights with regard to credit and not getting credit from unscrupulous banks that are out to rip off their customers.

I've been the victim of credit card fraud a few times now and have never lost physical possession of the cards. Not that that never happens, but a lot of credit card fraud involves data theft from within the banks. The last time this happened to me was a couple of months ago. My bank called me because a purchase had been made using a physical copy of my card at a pharmacy in another state. My actual card was still safely in my wallet. I had not reported my card stolen, because I still had my card. In developing the fraud claim, I discovered that someone had gone on a bit of a spree at a number of pharmacies and groceries. I filled out an affidavit, listing every fraudulent charge. The investigation took a few weeks, but eventually the charges, and associated interest and fees, were all credited and I was on the hook for exactly $0.

Really, the risk for any of us in the event of credit card fraud is quite small, at least monetarily. I'm still careful with my card, not so much because I'm afraid I'll lose beaucoup bucks to fraud, but because dealing with the fraud is a hassle, and it's no fun being a victim.
--
"Strive to change the world in such a way that there's no further need to be a dissident." Lawrence Ferlinghetti


jaykaykay
4 Ever Young
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I am happy that you think that it isn't a big problem...or at least one to sweat over. I do not agree at all. I know people who have had their information stolen from their card and have had horrible problems because of it, problems that made it almost impossible to get another account or another card, even though it was clearly not their fault. It depends entirely upon the individual that is having problems, believe it or not, and even if it didn't, this is one of those times when I would rather be safe than sorry and wear my tinfoil hat.

And even if I didn't, the title of this thread was a good reminder. Take it any other way, it's up to you.

--
JKK

Age is a very high price to pay for my maturity. If I can't stay young, I can at least stay immature!

»www.pbase.com/jaykaykay



jaykaykay
4 Ever Young
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reply to Johnny
I just had to look to see what Snopes had to say about this, and lo, and behold, they said it's possible but not common. That was written in 2004, which I dare say might have been true then. Now, it's all quite common. The article was updated in 2011, and it still took the card issues rather lightly, IMHO.


Johnny
Fed Up. Bye.
Premium
join:2001-06-27
Atlanta, GA
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to Doctor Olds
said by Doctor Olds:

said by jaykaykay:

First of all, I don't believe much of what Snopes has to offer. That being said, I know that the gym example can happen, for a fact, as it happened here in one that we belong. Just because Snopes says it isn't true, don't rely upon that site to lead you.

But Snopes didn't say it isn't true. You must have read something else. I read it said "POSSIBLE, BUT NOT COMMON" which means it does happen but very rarely.

When posting a random anonymous email without checking Snopes first, there are two responses when called out on it:

1. Admit that you should have checked Snopes first
2. Claim that Snopes is no good.

#1 is always the better choice.


jaykaykay
4 Ever Young
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join:2000-04-13
USA
kudos:24
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
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1 recommendation

"When posting a random anonymous email without checking Snopes first, there are two responses when called out on it:

1. Admit that you should have checked Snopes first
2. Claim that Snopes is no good.

#1 is always the better choice."

Wrong! Snopes is still not the end all to be all. I check my links before posting things. Have you not thought of the fact that there are other links to check something other than Snopes! I looked at Snopes only to see what they really did say (after looking at my own choice of links to see if something is true or not).

I didn't say I had not checked other sources prior to my post, and again, note the title to this thread...A good reminder for all... My intention was a reminder to be aware. It was not to prove the veracity of the way something was written. Since just about everyone is in agreement that watching one's credit cards is a good thing, let it go. But do keep in mind that Snopes is not the only way to check things on the Internet.
--
JKK

Age is a very high price to pay for my maturity. If I can't stay young, I can at least stay immature!

»www.pbase.com/jaykaykay



Johnny
Fed Up. Bye.
Premium
join:2001-06-27
Atlanta, GA
kudos:2
reply to jaykaykay
said by jaykaykay:

I just had to look to see what Snopes had to say about this, and lo, and behold, they said it's possible but not common. That was written in 2004, which I dare say might have been true then. Now, it's all quite common. The article was updated in 2011, and it still took the card issues rather lightly, IMHO.

All I did was post the link. I made no comment about it being true, false, or otherwise. But the Snopes discussion, as always, clarifies the actual situation, whereas the forwarded email, as always, is intended solely to scare, and to get itself forwarded.

Always select a chunk of the email blurb, and right-click and choose "Search with Google", (or however you do it on a PC, I have no idea). The first hit will usually be the Snopes article on the forwarded email.




goalieskates
Premium
join:2004-09-12
land of big
said by Johnny:

But the Snopes discussion, as always, clarifies the actual situation

No.

The point I believe jaykaykay is trying to make (and I agree completely) is that no one source can be completely relied on, even if they're generally right.

We, the users, still have to think; we can't just put ourselves on autopilot and blindly let someone else do our thinking for us. Things change, situations change, and what was true 5 years ago isn't automatically true now.

Snopes provides a service and I use it, but I have on occasion found it to be inaccurate based on direct experience. So there's no "as always" to it.


Johnny
Fed Up. Bye.
Premium
join:2001-06-27
Atlanta, GA
kudos:2

1 recommendation

I'll stand by my statement that Snopes always clarifies a forwarded email. Forwarded emails never, ever give a balanced assessment of the topic. That is not their purpose. Their purpose is to get forwarded.

So if you believe that Snopes is sometimes wrong, then read it and make a decision. Or read other urban-legend sites.

Something like this ancient email is virtually guaranteed to be in the Snopes collection, and intentionally not reading what Snopes has to say about it is silly.

Or we could just all ignore forwarded emails completely. I don't think there has ever been one that was worth reading.


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
reply to goalieskates
said by goalieskates:

What she said. Snopes has its uses, but there are times it misses badly.

Such as?

On this occasion their analysis appears to be spot on...I've heard this claimed other times, and when challenged, no good example has been forthcoming.
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong


goalieskates
Premium
join:2004-09-12
land of big
said by Ian:

said by goalieskates:

What she said. Snopes has its uses, but there are times it misses badly.

Such as?

On this occasion their analysis appears to be spot on...I've heard this claimed other times, and when challenged, no good example has been forthcoming.

Probably because your "challenge" is unreasonable and rigged. It's an old technique - demand "proof" chop chop, drop what you're doing and cite it now and then we can all argue some more. It's sophistry.

Snopes is not an article of faith. If you want to turn it into one, that's your problem. Snopes is a service run by humans, and sometimes humans get things wrong. Like I said earlier, we still have to use common sense and personal observation, not just put our faith on autopilot.


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
said by goalieskates:

said by Ian:

said by goalieskates:

What she said. Snopes has its uses, but there are times it misses badly.

Such as?

On this occasion their analysis appears to be spot on...I've heard this claimed other times, and when challenged, no good example has been forthcoming.

Probably because your "challenge" is unreasonable and rigged. It's an old technique - demand "proof" chop chop, drop what you're doing and cite it now and then we can all argue some more. It's sophistry.

Snopes is not an article of faith. If you want to turn it into one, that's your problem. Snopes is a service run by humans, and sometimes humans get things wrong. Like I said earlier, we still have to use common sense and personal observation, not just put our faith on autopilot.

If you're going to make the statement "but there are times it misses badly. " I hardly think it's unreasonable to ask for an example. A single example. When you made the statement, you implied that you knew of multiple times.

Is snopes.com perfect? Probably not. But in the case of researching one of these forwarded e-mails, they do a pretty good job.
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong