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JMAN
Premium
join:2010-07-15
Waterloo, ON

[Cable] IPV6 over cable (Rogers)

So, I was doing some quick searches on the forum and didn't see any new information regarding IPV6 and Rogers. I know Rogers is slowly testing it (»ipv6.rogers.com/ and especially »ipv6.rogers.com/tunneled-ipv6-access/). Just wondering if anyone else knew about the 6to4 access and has been using it (or maybe even the 6RD)?

I ended up getting the Netgear WNDR4500 router for my home a while back, since I knew it supported IPV6, and it does see the 6to4 setup from Rogers. Since then Ive been using the IPV6 options in various programs (ie for torrents) and it's been working quite fast and smoothly. Just curious if anyone else has been using IPV6 related features too.

Also did a traceroute, but from what I can tell it's not going through Teksavvy servers or hops (since 3rd hop resolves to gige-g2-18.core1.tor1.he.net). Id be curious to see when Teksavvy will get their hops in there or any sort of 6to4 relay.



squircle

join:2009-06-23
Oakville, ON

HE runs the most (and best, IMO) 6to4 relays in North America. If you traceroute to 192.88.99.1, you will almost always hit HE tunnel servers. Rogers's 6rd deployment goes through a Rogers-operated tunnel that (for most of Southern Ontario, it seems) is at their Wolfedale facility.

Here at UW there is a residence that isn't currently connected to the rest of the campus's network and uses Rogers modems in each unit. I set up 6to4 in one unit (where my coworkers are staying) and it seems to perform much better than 6rd (Rogers's tunnel server seemed to be bogged down a lot and latency would skyrocket). Hopefully they'll start offering native IPv6 over cable; my friend in Sunnyvale, CA (near San Jose, SF bay area) gets native IPv6 from Comcast via DHCPv6-PD (a /64 assigned to his OpenWRT router which radvd assigns via SLAAC to his clients).

I see no reason why Rogers can't do something similar, hopefully sooner than later.

As far as Teksavvy goes, you're still traversing their network from the POI to HE's tunnel server (as Teksavvy's traffic on disaggregated POI's is split at the POI itself), but AFAIK Teksavvy leases fibre links from Rogers to connect those POI's to 151 Front, where HE's tunnel servers are located. You may not see any Teksavvy hops in the form of RDNS entries on a traceroute, but I'd be surprised if an address or two from that trace isn't owned by TSI.



JMAN
Premium
join:2010-07-15
Waterloo, ON
reply to JMAN

Put it this way... if I were to do a traceroute to worldipv6launch.org for instance (id assume they might only have 1 server unlike sites like google)...

For ipv4:

Tracing route to worldipv6launch.org [212.110.167.157]
over a maximum of 30 hops:
 
  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.1.1
  2     8 ms    12 ms     7 ms  10.125.108.129
  3    15 ms    12 ms    15 ms  vl-201.gw03.mtbo.phub.net.cable.rogers.com [66.185.90.201]
  4    89 ms    99 ms    99 ms  kitchener3.cable.teksavvy.com [24.52.255.86]
  5    16 ms    80 ms    11 ms  kitchener2.cable.teksavvy.com [69.165.168.225]
  6    12 ms    15 ms    14 ms  10gigabitethernet4-3.core1.tor1.he.net [216.66.36.97]
  7    24 ms    23 ms    23 ms  10gigabitethernet4-1.core1.nyc4.he.net [184.105.222.17]
  8    94 ms    90 ms    98 ms  10gigabitethernet1-2.core1.lon1.he.net [72.52.92.242]
  9    93 ms   221 ms   231 ms  gi1-1.cr01.thn.bytemark.co.uk [195.66.225.144]
 10    97 ms    97 ms    96 ms  te3-6.cr02.man.bytemark.co.uk [91.223.58.35]
 11    96 ms    97 ms    96 ms  te1-5.cs2.reynolds.man.bytemark.co.uk [91.223.58.65]
 12    96 ms    95 ms    98 ms  fw2.man.bytemark.co.uk [89.16.160.70]
 13    98 ms    97 ms    97 ms  www.isoc.org [212.110.167.157]
 

And for ipv6:
Tracing route to worldipv6launch.org [2001:41c8:20::19]
over a maximum of 30 hops:
 
  1     1 ms     1 ms    <1 ms  2002:b8af:2ee9:e472:7644:1ff:fe51:3c25
  2    12 ms    13 ms    11 ms  2002:c058:6301::1
  3    15 ms    11 ms    14 ms  gige-g2-18.core1.tor1.he.net [2001:470:0:256::1]
 
  4    23 ms    21 ms    25 ms  10gigabitethernet4-1.core1.nyc4.he.net [2001:470:0:23f::1]
  5   100 ms    92 ms    97 ms  10gigabitethernet1-2.core1.lon1.he.net [2001:470:0:128::2]
  6    91 ms    90 ms    96 ms  2001:7f8:4::8a61:1
  7    98 ms    97 ms    97 ms  2001:41c8:0:82::1
  8    97 ms    97 ms    96 ms  2001:41c8:0:104::2
  9    96 ms   101 ms    96 ms  fw2.man.bytemark.co.uk [2001:41c8:0:806::46]
 10    98 ms    96 ms    96 ms  wiki.isoc.org [2001:41c8:20::19]
 

From what I can tell it's going to the first POI, and then skipping directly to HE's network, compared to ipv4 which goes through 3 extra hops.


squircle

join:2009-06-23
Oakville, ON

1 edit

You are comparing apples to oranges. Your IPv6 trace will never show the POI because there is a tunnel directly from your computer/client to the 6to4 tunnel server (HE in this case). Don't forget that between the first and second hops of your IPv6 trace, your packets still have to traverse hops 2-5 of your IPv4 trace.

In short, your IPv6 trace won't show the IPv4 hops between you and the tunnel server.

Let me give you an example. I have a 6in4 tunnel set up from my router to HE's Toronto tunnel servers. I'm going to combine an IPv4 and IPv6 traceroute to show you how my packets actually travel:

Here's my IPv4 trace to the tunnel server:

whistler:~ tyson$ mtr -4rw tserv21.tor1.ipv6.he.net
HOST: whistler.lan                          Loss%   Snt   Last   Avg  Best  Wrst StDev
  1.|-- cypress.lan                            0.0%    10    0.4   0.3   0.2   0.4   0.0
  2.|-- v250-rn-rt-uwt.uwaterloo.ca            0.0%    10    2.2   2.0   1.8   2.6   0.2
  3.|-- rn-rt-mc-1-1-a-rn-rt-uwt.uwaterloo.ca  0.0%    10    2.1   2.0   1.8   2.5   0.2
  4.|-- 172.16.31.53                           0.0%    10    0.9   2.5   0.6  15.5   4.6
  5.|-- 172.16.31.97                           0.0%    10    0.7   0.7   0.5   1.0   0.1
  6.|-- 172.16.31.118                          0.0%    10    0.9   0.8   0.7   1.0   0.1
  7.|-- 172.25.1.105                           0.0%    10    0.9   0.8   0.7   0.9   0.1
  8.|-- 66.97.28.65                            0.0%    10    1.0   1.1   0.9   1.2   0.1
  9.|-- be120.p01-lond.orion.on.ca             0.0%    10    9.5   9.3   9.1   9.5   0.1
 10.|-- be5.p01-york.orion.on.ca               0.0%    10    9.2   9.2   9.0   9.4   0.1
 11.|-- be201.gw01-toro.orion.on.ca            0.0%    10    9.3   9.2   9.0   9.7   0.2
 12.|-- gw-he.torontointernetxchange.net       0.0%    10   11.7  13.3  11.1  16.9   1.6
 13.|-- tserv1.tor1.he.net                     0.0%    10    9.0   9.4   8.9  11.4   1.0
 

And here's my IPv6 trace to my VPS in Cedar Knolls, NJ:

whistler:~ tyson$ mtr -6rw blackcomb.tppnw.com
HOST: whistler.lan                                  Loss%   Snt   Last   Avg  Best  Wrst StDev
  1.|-- cypress.lan                                    0.0%    10    0.4   0.5   0.4   0.7   0.1
  2.|-- hurricane-electric-tunnel-server-endpoint.lan  0.0%    10   11.4  11.7  11.4  12.2   0.4
  3.|-- gige-g2-5.core1.tor1.he.net                    0.0%    10    9.5  10.5   9.4  17.4   2.5
  4.|-- nac.ip6.torontointernetxchange.net             0.0%    10   22.2  22.3  22.1  23.0   0.3
  5.|-- e1.2.tbr1.mmu.nac.net                          0.0%    10   22.0  22.0  21.6  22.8   0.3
  6.|-- vlan801.esd1.mmu.nac.net                       0.0%    10   22.2  22.2  22.0  22.6   0.2
  7.|-- 2001:518:2800:3::2                             0.0%    10   22.0  22.4  21.9  24.1   0.7
  8.|-- blackcomb.tppnw.com                            0.0%    10   22.3  22.3  21.9  23.9   0.6
 

Now combined, this is the route the packets take:

1    --> cypress.lan (my router)                                     [IPv6 hop 1]
====== IPv6 packets are encapsulated in IPv4 packets
2-13 --> UW routers to HOT to Orion, through TorIX to HE             [IPv4 hops 1-12]
====== Encapsulation is removed and IPv6 packets travel alone
14-15--> HE's Toronto core routers/tunnel server                     [IPv6 hop 2-3]
16-18--> NAC's (colo provider) IPv6 link from TorIX to their colo    [IPv6 hops 4-6]
19-20--> VPS provider's routers and finally, my server               [IPv6 hops 7-8]
 

So you see that my packets actually took 20 hops, but neither protocol took more than 12 hops. Like I said before, you'll never see the POI in an IPv6 traceroute because your IPv6 route is tunneled.