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Hpjunior

@50.44.15.x
reply to Action2

Re: [DSL] Extreme Slow downs Frontier 12/2

I just signed up for Frontier on Friday and Had received the modem on modem on Monday. I subscribe to the 49.99 6Mbps Max Plan and I definitely not getting the speeds I should. The modem is provision at 1792kbps/448kbps with Attenuation of 60. I called Tech Support about the issue and they're giving me the run around saying that My area is considered congested and that It was supposed to be done the end of December. Well it's January and despite moving my modem to different jacks, My attenuation is high and A couple of times it disconnected me and reconnected me at 64kbps/32kbps. I don't know if they're using the congestion as an excuse or they're trying to scam people to think that they're getting speeds that they're really isn't. I'm in the Rockford/Belvidere Area.


Heikkila14

join:2013-01-01
Almont, MI

Its that time again d/l speeds just dropped to 4mb from 10.6mb at 4pm.


jamesonnorth

join:2012-12-22
Modoc, IN
reply to Hpjunior

@hpjunior Attenuation of 60 is very high and I wouldn't expect speeds over 2.5-3mbps to work reliably. But there IS more to a connection than attenuation. If the SNR is low, you won't be able to hold a fast connection, and if you're getting lots of errors, you'll have the same issue. Sometimes Frontier puts people on a stability profile if you have a troublesome line.

Here's what you can do: connect the modem directly to the NID with a short, known good cable. If you're still seeing low sync speeds, high attenuation, low SNR or other problems, you might want to call Frontier and ask if there's anything they can do for your line. If it does better when directly connected to the NID, you know the issue is with your inside wiring or telephones (no filters, old phones, etc)

It's not the perfect solution, but sometimes going to Interleaved can help. It will slow your pings though.

Congestion won't necessarily limit your sync speeds but it WILL limit your real world throughput. Post up your line stats and we can take a look.
--
CompTIA Net+ Network Administrator - I know networks!
Professional Photographer - www.jnphoto.biz - Weddings and Senior Photos
Nice and comfy with Frontier DSL: I can help with your issues!
»speedtest.net/result/2387637868.png



Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
Premium
join:2002-05-21
Burlington, WV
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

said by jamesonnorth:

Congestion won't necessarily limit your sync speeds but it WILL limit your real world throughput. Post up your line stats and we can take a look.

In the area I live, a legacy Frontier area, we have severe congestion. Experience has shown that it can have an impact on your sync speed and in severe cases prevent you from syncing or cause constant resyncs; it can even prevent one from being able to pull an IP in addition to limiting your real world throughput. It all depends upon where the congestion actually occurs.

jamesonnorth

join:2012-12-22
Modoc, IN

I stand corrected. I wasn't aware anyone had issues with syncing when congestion is involved. For most people I doubt this would be an issue, though it is definitely worth looking into.



Smith6612
Premium,MVM
join:2008-02-01
North Tonawanda, NY
kudos:24
Reviews:
·Verizon Online DSL
·Frontier Communi..

3 edits

I can attest to what Hank is talking about. I can't chime into the sync rate being affected by congestion, unless it's the DSLAM being told to set lines to certain speeds under certain conditions. That, or if there is a lot of crosstalk in a trunk because of a high volume of connections running in there. I can chime into the disconnects being caused by congestion though. If there is a technical reason as to why the sync rate drops from congestion (bandwidth, not something noise related or exceeding the limit of customers a remote should have active) I'd love to hear it!

Verizon has a bunch of older remotes from Catena in this area which are connected back to the Central Office using T3 lines, delivered over Fiber. Many of these older remotes are somewhat rural and have gone unupgraded for quite a while and have needed to take on additional loads, such as brand new neighborhoods springing up or heavier loads. One of my relatives who used to have DSL with them and has since moved to Cable Internet used to have this issue. For over a year and a half, every day or two, sometimes several times a day their Internet connection would go into a constant re-synchronization for up to several hours. The modem would train, immediately drop the connection before it could start to establish PPPoE connectivity, and then start the whole process over. It was an issue with the entire remote, and every line would drop as a result. I believe it was due to an issue with the remote's Integrated DSLAM that caused it to reboot since that is how it behaved. Even when Verizon did fix that issue, or when it ironed itself out the remote suffered from heavy congestion at night for years. Speed tests would be around 50kbps download, 100kbps upload on a 1.5Mbps/384kbps circuit, PPPoE connections would drop, and latency when idle would be in the hundreds. The circuit on the remote was found to be running beyond 92% capacity, often a step or two from 100% for about 15 days out of the month. No one gave a glance at the remote and instead the solution was to keep sending modems. No idea how it's running to this day. Hopefully it gave up and died or got hit by a snow plow or from lightning so it'd get some much needed attention.

The irony of the above situation as well: The remote sits 1000 feet away in a farm field from a location that is served by Verizon FiOS, in another county and from another CO.


jamesonnorth

join:2012-12-22
Modoc, IN

That irony is the sad truth in the broadband world. 100 people served by two or three 45mbps lines, and 1000 feet away there's capacity for hundreds of megabits probably with less than 40% utilization.

I'm pretty sure my CO has an OC3 or higher, and I bet the remotes are in a similar situation to your area. Luckily I'm not on a remote or I'd really be screwed. I guess living in a rural area I'm lucky to get 6mbps. It's not 1000 feet away, but there is at least one if not more of at least 1gbit line of dark fiber line running about 3 miles away. If Frontier cared to expand my area, they could have 25mbps VDSL for half the cost of Comcast and drive them out. Unfortunately I doubt that will happen until 50mbps is the norm for Comcast.
--
CompTIA Net+ Network Administrator - I know networks!
Professional Photographer - www.jnphoto.biz - Weddings and Senior Photos
Nice and comfy with Frontier DSL: I can help with your issues!
»speedtest.net/result/2387637868.png



Smith6612
Premium,MVM
join:2008-02-01
North Tonawanda, NY
kudos:24
Reviews:
·Verizon Online DSL
·Frontier Communi..

I should say, in the case of this remote it was one T3 line per DSLAM. The T3 was sent over OC12 Fiber. I don't know how many DSLAMs were available in that remote but things got pretty bad. It's not like the Litespan I feed out of for Verizon which has OC3 fiber directly going to it (it's old, too) or Frontier's Adtran DSLAM in the remote which I would presume has at least an OC3, the remote itself probably having an OC12 back to the CO with their higher VDSL2 speeds now being available to me.