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bullwinkle

join:2011-03-19
Nepean, ON
reply to resa1983

Re: Teksavvy Voltage motion - Looking for some advice

said by resa1983:

A LOT of people file their own motions pro se in US regarding in these copy suits. The judges tend to go easy on them (ie not knowing all the rules, etc), and a lot of the time they do get severed.

Thats not to say it'll work here, but, who knows.

Apparently, representing yourself can be a gamble, even for lawyers. There was an article about this in the Citizen a few days ago:

»www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Self+ ··· ory.html


Dr Facts

@gc.ca
>Apparently, representing yourself can be a gamble,

It really is and when you go without a lawyer you're not working within the system and that rarely goes well.

It's like walking into a dark forest without a guide, theoretically you can do it, after all it's just walking! but in reality you'll end up falling off a cliff that a guide with experience could have seen coming.

You have to remember in court there is no undo, when you say something stupid that hurts your case, that's it you're done.

If you've gotten notice from TSI that Voltage has you in their troll-sights start looking at lawyer options now so that if the judge in two weeks gives them your name and number you can hit the ground running.

It can't be said enough, they're bullies they'll only go after the vulnerable and those would be anyone without a lawyer.

resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10
reply to bullwinkle
said by bullwinkle:

said by resa1983:

A LOT of people file their own motions pro se in US regarding in these copy suits. The judges tend to go easy on them (ie not knowing all the rules, etc), and a lot of the time they do get severed.

Thats not to say it'll work here, but, who knows.

Apparently, representing yourself can be a gamble, even for lawyers. There was an article about this in the Citizen a few days ago:

»www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Self+ ··· ory.html

Wow.. That just goes to show the difference between the Canadian and US courts..
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP

shepd

join:2004-01-17
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
reply to bullwinkle
said by bullwinkle:

Apparently, representing yourself can be a gamble, even for lawyers. There was an article about this in the Citizen a few days ago:

»www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Self+ ··· ory.html

That article is true to my experience. In my case, I spent more time informing the Judge about section 800 of the criminal code than I did speaking about the case. In the end the judge wasn't particularly convinced until the prosecution read him that section right out of the book and reminded him that I'm right. As which point he played the game of asking me to step behind the bar. I asked the person I was helping to do so as well as the court was showing prejudice against him without my support. The games ended at that point and the judge decided he'd rather not waste time and get it over with and let me be his agent. Halfway through the case a new prosecutor took over who I had to explain that section of the criminal code too. She wanted to speak with him in private. No way hosay. It takes nerves of steel to deal with what the government in this country will throw up against anyone who doesn't want a lawyer to help them.

That being said, I enjoys me some anti-authority moments, I'd do it again in a heartbeat. But if you aren't willing to stand up there and literally tell the judge they are wrong and you know more than them, you won't get anywhere. And it's a rather weird feeling when you do that and win. More than once. Kind of reminds you of the fact that Judges never do have to be lawyers, nor have any law experience, to head up that position.