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TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
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·WesTex Connect
reply to pandora

Re: My addition will take almost 2 miles of Cat 6

Actually, these days, one should probably have as many RJ45 outlets as they have electrical outlets.

Soon your microwave, refrigerator, and washing machine will be connected to CAT5/RJ45.

If one is needing 8 links to a room that is far from the network closet I would run a 10G link between the network closet and room and use a gigabit switch to split the 10G connection to the devices in the room.
--
CompTIA Network+ Certified


pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
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Reviews:
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1 recommendation

said by TheTechGuru:

Soon your microwave, refrigerator, and washing machine will be connected to CAT5/RJ45.

I tend to believe either hardwired or wireless, but my expectation is many large appliances will be net connected in the future. I'd like a fridge that could scan rfid products to provide inventory, meal suggestions, text family members when low on staples and let us know when something is near or past expiration date.

My home is likely to have in excess of 100 Cat 6 cable runs in it, all terminating in a common area above the server / router wall cabinet.

I wish PoE could run lights or low power PC's. I believe for fast, reliable streaming and connectivity, wired is better than wireless, but the house will have a number of PoE wireless access points built in as well.

4 thermostats are Z-Wave, and I'm trying a Z-wave door lock. I'd like to try a facial recognition system that works with alarm systems, the alarm protocol can be processed by Homeseer if I had time to write an application for it.
--
"If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand." - Milton Friedman"


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

2 recommendations

reply to TheTechGuru

said by TheTechGuru:

Soon your microwave, refrigerator, and washing machine will be connected to CAT5/RJ45.

Actually no, they'll be on WiFi even with your picture proving wired > wireless. It's not like the washing machine will need to download/upload a 1080p copy of Avatar.


pokesph
It Is Almost Fast
Premium
join:2001-06-25
Sacramento, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by alkizmo:

Actually no, they'll be on WiFi even with your picture proving wired > wireless. It's not like the washing machine will need to download/upload a 1080p copy of Avatar.

It may not need to (and likely won't), BUT it WILL be accused of doing so.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·HughesNet Satell..
·WesTex Connect
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

Actually no, they'll be on WiFi even with your picture proving wired > wireless. It's not like the washing machine will need to download/upload a 1080p copy of Avatar.

But that could be a major interference problem if one is in a apartment/condo complex and everyone in it has one.
--
CompTIA Network+ Certified


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by TheTechGuru:

But that could be a major interference problem if one is in a apartment/condo complex and everyone in it has one.

Wifi technology will adapt.
But you'll never see a fridge with RJ45.


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:10

said by alkizmo:

Wifi technology will adapt.

It'll be too little too late. Around here, channels 8+ are completely unusable due to noise/interference, and there are well over a dozen access points within range on channels 1-7. Everyone's constantly having their devices kicked off for one reason or another. It's generally not too bad, but can be really annoying if you're in the middle of a game or streaming a movie or something. 5GHz "N" has been out for years now but the devices which support it are few and far between. 802.11ac is gonna do jack shit due to the sheer number of channels they're talking about bonding (it'll be just as congested as 2.4GHz is now).

said by alkizmo:

But you'll never see a fridge with RJ45.

Where technology is concerned, never say never. Or are you trying to say they'll skip the puny copper and go right to fiber?

/M

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

But you'll never see a fridge with RJ45.

»asia.cnet.com/lg-gr-d267dtu-inte···9200.htm

Your information is apparently already a decade out of date. While I do agree it's more likely wireless (802.11 or otherwise) will be more mainstream with kitchen appliances, never say never until doing a quick search.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by AVonGauss:

»asia.cnet.com/lg-gr-d267dtu-inte···9200.htm

Your information is apparently already a decade out of date. While I do agree it's more likely wireless (802.11 or otherwise) will be more mainstream with kitchen appliances, never say never until doing a quick search.

OH effing PLEASE
That's an exception.
AND it's from 2002, when RJ45 for networking made more sense

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL

said by alkizmo:

OH effing PLEASE
That's an exception.
AND it's from 2002, when RJ45 for networking made more sense

That was the oldest reference I saw from a 5 second search. Never has already happened, and in the use case of providing video it even makes a tad bit of sense.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by AVonGauss:

said by alkizmo:

OH effing PLEASE
That's an exception.
AND it's from 2002, when RJ45 for networking made more sense

That was the oldest reference I saw from a 5 second search. Never has already happened, and in the use case of providing video it even makes a tad bit of sense.

Actually this seems more like the oldest reference
»news.cnet.com/Net-fridge-comes-i···207.html
1999, you can imagine it was RJ45.

But the point being is: We won't see it go that way. These fridges were mad-science internet boom attempts at marketing junk. The reality of things is that we won't see technology evolve where appliances can connect to the web and need RJ45. RJ45 isn't a functional connectivity method for the typical home, WIFI is.

Broadband is another topic all together.


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to mackey

said by mackey:

It'll be too little too late. Around here, channels 8+ are completely unusable due to noise/interference, and there are well over a dozen access points within range on channels 1-7. Everyone's constantly having their devices kicked off for one reason or another.

Like this?

2.4 wireless is quite congested around here in south Cali.

00:0F:66:4E:DB:43 LinRMKN4 WEP -54 / -88 2.437 6
00:1C:10:1B:F6:93 linksys NONE -65 / -88 2.437 6
00:23:69:54:D8:D4 michaud WEP -81 / -88 2.437 6
00:1E:E5:3C:AD:9D ivette WEP -83 / -88 2.437 6
00:14:60:F4:BF:5F Home NONE -83 / -87 2.452 9
C0:83:0A:31:67:F9 2WIRE427 WEP -62 / -87 2.452 9
E0:46:9A:75:EF:E5 ASSTASTIC WEP -56 / -87 2.462 11
20:AA:4B:CE:23:BB Tran-guest NONE -90 / -96 2.462 11
C0:3F:0E:9E:F8:DC LEG WEP -72 / -87 2.462 11
3C:EA:4F:64:9B:09 2WIRE738 WEP -89 / -96 2.462 11
4C:60:DE:B9:17:4C ATT8881 WPA2 -55 / -85 2.412 1
20:AA:4B:90:0A:24 Estrada WPA -88 / -96 2.412 1
00:22:6B:4B:DE:74 duc WPA -79 / -85 2.412 1
00:1D:CF:2C:1C:60 HOME-1C62 WPA2 -64 / -85 2.412 1
00:24:B2:25:61:62 JANA WPA -68 / -85 2.412 1
C0:3F:0E:99:5D:0C diabolo159 WPA -75 / -85 2.412 1
00:22:3F:9B:62:A4 frangear WPA -55 / -86 2.417 2
08:86:3B:18:AE:AA Solo Cali WPA2 -49 / -86 2.417 2
08:86:3B:32:C3:D6 belkin.3d6 WPA2 -56 / -86 2.417 2
30:46:9A:1C:63:EC Andysinbiz WPA -76 / -86 2.417 2
E0:91:F5:A8:D7:52 Enid WPA -72 / -86 2.417 2
48:28:2F:FE:FD:B0 Verizon-890L-FDB0 WPA2 -81 / -83 2.427 4
28:16:2E:FF:E0:09 2WIRE113 WPA -85 / -96 2.427 4
74:44:01:31:45:58 roberto12345 WPA2 -71 / -88 2.437 6
08:86:3B:E1:A8:43 belkin.843 WPA -57 / -88 2.437 6
20:4E:7F:B8:34:F8 GAZ97 WPA2 -66 / -88 2.437 6
1C:AF:F7:D5:22:77 memo WPA -65 / -88 2.437 6
00:25:F2:FE:41:C8 MOTOROLA-41B5A WPA -68 / -88 2.437 6
00:1C:10:3F:8C:7A linksys_SES_35931 WPA -74 / -88 2.437 6
2C:B0:5D:36:F3:16 503SLV WPA2 -67 / -88 2.437 6
00:22:A4:1F:68:D1 2WIRE862 WPA -83 / -88 2.437 6
00:26:50:2C:2E:39 2WIRE913 WPA -70 / -86 2.447 8
00:22:A4:BF:1F:79 2WIRE057 WPA -71 / -86 2.447 8
00:24:56:65:4A:49 Brian1 WPA -88 / -96 2.447 8
74:9D:DC:49:DF:99 2WIRE586 WPA -86 / -86 2.447 8
84:1B:5E:2D:84:FC NETGEAR85 WPA2 -79 / -87 2.452 9
74:44:01:49:37:7F NETGEAR63 WPA2 -70 / -87 2.452 9
00:25:9C:9D:DC:14 akelaitis WPA -71 / -87 2.452 9
00:1D:7E:41:04:16 HouseX WPA2 -81 / -87 2.452 9
3C:EA:4F:D5:B4:C1 2WIRE795 WPA -84 / -87 2.457 10
64:0F:29:09:B2:B1 2WIRE489 WPA -81 / -87 2.457 10
94:44:52:42:6B:30 INGO-HP_Network WPA2 -93 / -96 2.462 11
22:C9:D0:1A:80:F0 games's Guest Network WPA2 -89 / -96 2.462 11
00:23:69:E1:1A:63 catherine WPA2 -89 / -96 2.462 11
EC:1A:59:06:52:AA Galerians WPA -69 / -87 2.462 11
C0:3F:0E:94:37:70 loopdog WPA -77 / -87 2.462 11
34:EF:44:E1:3D:59 2WIRE713 WPA -68 / -87 2.462 11



ke4pym
Premium
join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC
Reviews:
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reply to pandora

said by pandora:

I wish PoE could run lights or low power PC's. I believe for fast, reliable streaming and connectivity, wired is better than wireless, but the house will have a number of PoE wireless access points built in as well.

It can. We use PoE to energize our VDI terminals at work.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
reply to 54067323


--
CompTIA Network+ Certified



leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

But you'll never see a fridge with RJ45.

Sorry, but you are wrong on that one. I have already seen that at the local Fry's Electronic store.
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by leibold:

Sorry, but you are wrong on that one. I have already seen that at the local Fry's Electronic store.

10 years ago?
What?
Which fridge?
And what's the point?
My car's on Bluetooth, why aren't the fridges too?

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

Bluetooth -- doesn't do much distance and doesn't do walls very well. Works decent in a car, but would be total junk in a fridge.



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to leibold

said by leibold:

said by alkizmo:

But you'll never see a fridge with RJ45.

Sorry, but you are wrong on that one. I have already seen that at the local Fry's Electronic store.

Interestingly enough when I worked at Fujitsu in 1999/2000 they had a concept of an e-fridge and I believe they had a working prototype. It had a barcode scanner and a network jack and you would scan stuff as it went in and scanned it when it was empty. That way you kept track of stuff.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

Which fridge?

I really don't remember. I don't think it was as long as 10 years ago but it might have been. The one thing I do clearly remember is the thought that immediately popped into my head: "Oh no, I didn't wire the kitchen!".
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NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06
reply to fifty nine

And it warned you before an item was ready to get up and walk out on its own?
--
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ke4pym
Premium
join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC
Reviews:
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reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

said by leibold:

Sorry, but you are wrong on that one. I have already seen that at the local Fry's Electronic store.

10 years ago?
What?
Which fridge?
And what's the point?
My car's on Bluetooth, why aren't the fridges too?

Doesn't have an RJ45 jack. But does have WiFi -

»www.samsung.com/us/appliances/re···HARS/XAA


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

Interestingly enough when I worked at Fujitsu in 1999/2000 they had a concept of an e-fridge and I believe they had a working prototype. It had a barcode scanner and a network jack and you would scan stuff as it went in and scanned it when it was empty. That way you kept track of stuff.

LG makes one similar - tied into a grocery service, even, so you can make a shopping list or order stuff straight from the touch screen on the door... I helped install a bunch of them in a high-end condo development a friend of mine worked on.


leibold
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join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to ke4pym

said by ke4pym:

Doesn't have an RJ45 jack. But does have WiFi -

Those Samsung ones are more recent products. I looked at one of those as well (for curiosity, not with the intend to buy) and based on where the wireless antenna was located was wondering how well it would work. It seemed to me that the stainless steel exterior would block most of the wireless signal ?
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by leibold:

said by ke4pym:

Doesn't have an RJ45 jack. But does have WiFi -

Those Samsung ones are more recent products. I looked at one of those as well (for curiosity, not with the intend to buy) and based on where the wireless antenna was located was wondering how well it would work. It seemed to me that the stainless steel exterior would block most of the wireless signal ?

My original point exactly: WiFi is now for such appliances. RJ45 was 10-12 years ago when WiFi wasn't very main stream and expensive.

These were just computers in refrigerators. That fad probably came along with TVs in the refrigerator doors. It was a gimmick.

With laptops and tablets, nobody needs a computer in the refridgerator (for the women *wink wink*).

If appliances have internet hook up these days, it would only be for monitoring/remote control, which requires very little bandwidth and wifi would be most practical.

As for where the antenna is located, could be anywhere, maybe along the edge where there's a rubber pad protecting a corner so the stainless panels don't interfere.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

The antenna on the model I looked at was deep inside the door behind ice/water dispenser. It seemed to allow for only a narrow angle of exposure (towards the front of the refrigerator).

That might be fine if the fridge is installed along an exterior house wall since then the fridge front would face into the house. The only way that it would work if the fridge is installed along an interior wall is if you can pick up your neighbors wifi

It will be interesting to see what form of wireless home automation will ultimately prevail. There is nothing to prevent using wifi but Zigbee seems currently leading actual product availability (limited as it is). Bluetooth (as already mentioned) is being considered for this purpose as well.

The Internet fridge (depending on how it is being used) might be more bandwidth intensive (and hence wifi the more logical choice) then typical home automation tasks (sensors and controls).
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NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06

said by leibold:

The Internet fridge

Why does that just sound so... cool?
--
"...but ya doesn't hasta call me Johnson!"

ke4pym
Premium
join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC
Reviews:
·VOIPO
·ooma
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said by NotTheMama:

said by leibold:

The Internet fridge

Why does that just sound so... cool?

It really isn't. I'm a Samsung whore, I'll admit it. But their "internet-fridge" sucks. The layout of the shelves is poor. Perhaps if you lived alone and never made a turkey dinner, it'd be a fine fridge. But if you have a family or even another person living with you, it really isn't the fridge to have.


NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06

...wasn't really referring to any specific fridge--just the term "Internet fridge" (in all its varied meanings of "coolness")
--
"...but ya doesn't hasta call me Johnson!"



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to leibold

said by leibold:

The Internet fridge (depending on how it is being used) might be more bandwidth intensive (and hence wifi the more logical choice) then typical home automation tasks (sensors and controls).

Yeah but we're talking about 1kb vs 50kb (depending on the level of useless junk is sent in between). Yet we're bashing WiFi because it can only do 8mbps in heavy traffic areas vs 1gbps wired. That 8mbps is gargantuous for any remote automation products.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

The "high bandwidth" example I was thinking off was the case of watching a cooking show and following along in your own kitchen (or even just using it as a TV in general to follow that "must watch immediately" show while preparing a meal).
You might want a bit more then 50kbps for that but 1Mbps would certainly be enough for a quality video stream that lets you read the ingredients list clearly.

Not much bandwidth is needed for maintaining a fridge inventory even if you add online shopping to refill it.
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