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tonyl

@exxonmobil.com

WiFi signal Strength

I have ATT UVerse 2wire wifi. The signal strength is ok in some parts of the house but low in others. Can I get something to boost my signal from the UVerse unit?



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

I have the same question. My gateway is not in a central spot in my house. Rooms on the opposite side of the house drop to 2 bars or less.

An old post asked about range extenders, and it seemed like they won't work. Is that true?

What about replacing the internal antenna or added a directional external antenna?

Are there any 802.11N routers I can add, with a wired interface, to actually realize the higher speed?


Gardentool

join:2013-01-18
Oklahoma City, OK
reply to tonyl

I don't know what 2Wire HG you have but in my experience the 3800 sucked especially for WiFi. Your options include:

Setting up a router behind the 2Wire, which may or may not work well. I never got it to work quite right in my setup. The 3800 did not offer a true bridge mode, and I'm not sure if any of their other products do too.

Setting up an Access Point, which is pretty much the WiFi part of a router. It could be put up anywhere you can put ethernet and power. Devices access it, it is connected to the 2Wire and it should work better as long as it's a decent one. Make sure you can disable the 2Wire's WiFi first, especially if they are on the same band (i.e. 2.4GHz).

Move the 2Wire around the house, but not always feasible and it could cause low signal in other areas. You could also try seeing if mounting it to the wall helps. And try to keep it outside of any cabinets/drawers. Having it inside of something will cause some signal loss.



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA

So really, that's it? No one has had success doing this that can post specifics?


jrthomas

join:2002-01-24
Roswell, GA

Here's a good summary of DIY Linux Router Distros that would let you set-up your own access point:
»Exploring DIY Linux Router Distros



brookeKrige

join:2012-11-05
San Jose, CA
kudos:3
reply to tonyl

Wily_One,
Search this forum for DMZ+, for example: »Re: Slow internet U-verse 12mbit

Both you and tonyl: What model are your RG's? "2wire" is ambiguous, not the specific model-name.

Posts imply ATT reusing rejecting RG's on other customers, and some older 2wire's wireless signal just deteriorating over time (with recommendation even to make it last, by reducing transmit power).

In theory, hope ATT would replace your RG, if its wireless range is defective. Don't know how they judge such complaints.

Haven't used it, HomePlug can extend your network thru house power; instead of trying for one wifi to reach everywhere.



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

My RG was replaced last year, I have the 3801HGV now. I'm on the 18Mb profile and have no complaints about "Internet speed" per se, just low signal in the far corners of my home. I don't have a particularly big house, but as I say my RG is situated on one side of it, and won't be moved.

Prior to recently I never really cared about the wireless aspect, since my house is hard-wired. However with Wi-Fi capable cellphones and Xboxes in the house, plus the occasional visitor with a tablet or laptop, wireless has taken on new importance.



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:10
reply to tonyl

If you don't mind leaving the 2wire as the main router, it's really easy to add something to just extend the WiFi range...

1) Buy new router with better WiFi.
2) Before hooking it up to the 2wire, log in to the admin interface (on the new router) and disable the DHCP server and make sure its IP address is different then the 2wires'.
3) Plug a cable between one of the new routers LAN ports and one of the 2wires LAN ports. Leave the WAN port on the new router unconnected.

Done. No need to mess around with port forwarding or DMZ+ or anything.

/M



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

said by mackey:

2) Before hooking it up to the 2wire, log in to the admin interface (on the new router) and disable the DHCP server and make sure its IP address is different then the 2wires'.

Then my wired machines won't work unless I give them static addresses. The way around that would be to simply create a separate DHCP range on the WiFi AP but within the same 192.168.1 subnet as the RG.

Now I'll have to look into a good but cheap Wireless router.


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:10

said by Wily_One:

said by mackey:

2) Before hooking it up to the 2wire, log in to the admin interface (on the new router) and disable the DHCP server and make sure its IP address is different then the 2wires'.

Then my wired machines won't work unless I give them static addresses. The way around that would be to simply create a separate DHCP range on the WiFi AP but within the same 192.168.1 subnet as the RG.

Now I'll have to look into a good but cheap Wireless router.

What are you talking about? Step 3 causes everything behind the new router to get an IP from the DHCP server on the original router. I said LAN port to LAN port, not LAN port to WAN port.

/M


Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

What I have hard-wired will remain as it now, plugged into the RG. I took your post to mean plugging everything into this new router, which would be down-level from the RG.

Are you saying the RG will pass DHCP requests from machines hard-wired to it on to this other router?



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:10

When connected LAN to LAN, everything is on the same network/level (they're both equal; one's not "down-level" from the other). This is why you need to disable the DHCP server on the new router. Everything connected to the new router, both wired and wireless, will simply be passed along to the existing RG.

The WAN port on the new router should be left not connected to anything.

With the DHCP server disabled and nothing connected to the WAN port, the new "router" is now nothing more then a dumb switch and wireless access point.

/M



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA

Yeah see I was thinking of mounting an AP up high, so don't want all but one network cable attached.



FIRE101

@sbcglobal.net
reply to tonyl

The wifi signal strength on the 3800HGV is horrible - I start losing bars within 15 feet of the router, and have no signal within 30-ft. It didn't matter what I did with any of the settings.

With my old set-up (prior to uverse), I had an older Linksys router which I had installed DDWRT. I set-up the router as a wireless access point, and just plug it into the back of the 2wire router. I now have excellent signal strength within 75-100 feet of the access point.

Important hints when setting this up - follow the instructions on the DDWRT website, use different wireless network names for the 2wire router and the access point, and give the access point an ip address far from that of the router (i.e. if the router is 182.166.5.254, the access point should be something like 182.166.5.75).



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:10

The IP doesn't need to be far away, just different. I like going 1 off as it makes it easy to find/remember later when a WPA key or SSID needs to be changed. If you do go far off (or even if you don't) I highly recommend writing it down on some tape or something attached to the access point so you can find it easily 6+ months from now.

/M



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA

...and make sure you don't wind up using an IP from the DHCP range.