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mr weather
Premium
join:2002-02-27
Mississauga, ON
reply to donoreo

Re: Windsor: Gov is going to find the "hum"

Oh yeah, it's been a huge issue in Windsor. I grew up on the east side so I never got to experience the semi-regular salt mine blasting but I've heard it's an interesting experience.

Some theories point to the Zug Island industrial area of downriver Detroit. The hum has been described as a low, diesel locomotive-like rumble. Barely audible but (apparently) felt by many west side residents.
--
"It's all coming down!!" - Mike Holmes


neochu

join:2008-12-12
Windsor, ON

2 edits
said by mr weather:

Oh yeah, it's been a huge issue in Windsor. I grew up on the east side so I never got to experience the semi-regular salt mine blasting but I've heard it's an interesting experience.

Some theories point to the Zug Island industrial area of downriver Detroit. The hum has been described as a low, diesel locomotive-like rumble. Barely audible but (apparently) felt by many west side residents.

The hum is JUST below the auditory range of humans so some can hear it others cannot. Most just feel it or its other environmental sensitivities going into play. There has been PLENTY of 3rd party analysis of the signal all over the place with real spectrography of the noise.

I live by the former Ford PowerHouse and it has been "recorded" on Pillette, near the tracks but I have never heard it (and I have incredibly sensitive ears) for example.

There are about 15 or 16 possible SURFACE sources of the specific vibration detected and US residents in Delray and other Downriver Communities have corroborated with the google map. (search on you-tube there is a recording of it as well). In fact, I believe the government already placed numerous highly sensitive acoustic sensors all over the area to map it and pretty much know were it is coming from.

said by shrug :

Seem to recall this topic from a couple of years ago...

»www.thestar.com/news/canada/arti···esidents

Seems to me instead of people wondering what it is, they should all get the hell out of there before the place just collapses into one big crater.

That has got to affect property value when you can feel the vibration if you put your hand on your house walls, or see the ripples in a glass of water, and knowing there is a cave of salt being excavated 300 meters below your house.

Hope the gov is prepared to give the people in this sink hole compensation.

"That sink hole/cavern thing" is well mapped and they know where it is now It is only about 400 meters wide and currently the only thing built on it is a large Saw Mill (with the rest unused grey fields). The salt mine shafts are closer to 250metres down within the E and F salt layers and the roof of the cavern isn't seen until about 300 down in the "C" Layer. They do not join or intersect.

Most of those shafts and sites are well mapped and modern hot-water extraction does not lead to heavy collapse like it did back then.

(whats more fun is that at about 280m they found a large aquifer that runs all the way into the US Midwest. They had to quickly seal that up)

I also don't get why people continue to scream about this. It was mapped by the DRIC team during geotechnical studies. You can find the raw data on that website.

Unofficial 3rd party analysis strongly suggests its coming from poorly maintained equipment in the Zug Island refinery on the surface, not salt mine blasting -- which is announced, pre-planned and occasional (not continuous like this noise). This is backed up of course by acoustic sensor data.

The bigger issue here isn't the verification of the source. It is international politics in play. The municipality that operates Zug Island pretty much told the Canadians they are not going to do a thing due to pressure (bullying) from the refinery. Essentially it is "costing them too much" to trace the noise properly and told the Canadians to pound salt (no pun intended). They don't wanna lose their only employer even if it "melts people's brains".

The EPA requires a formally verified peer reviewed study to be done to move on the issue. I suspect thats what the money is for.