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mromero
Premium
join:2000-12-07
The O.C.
kudos:1

2 edits

Intel getting out of the motherboard biz....

»hothardware.com/News/The-End-of-···-Market/

»www.theverge.com/2013/1/22/39055···erboards

»www.anandtech.com/show/6685/the-···-3-years

We have received news directly from Intel that the company will stop developing new desktop motherboards once the launch of its next-gen Haswell architecture is completed, sometime later this year. This move does not impact Intel’s desktop chipset plans and Intel will support and warranty all of the current products it sells, through the full stated warranty period included with the specific product. Intel also plans on launching and shipping its Haswell-based products for 2013 under its normal sales terms, and will expect deliveries to continue through the normal life of those products (usually 18 months from launch). But post-Haswell, Intel will cease production of standard desktop motherboards. We’re told, however, that the ramp down will not affect non-motherboard products like the Next Unit of Computing (NUC) line up, which will continue shipping, including NUC barebones motherboards.


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

I read this in the summer as well, same story, but not much more was said about it since. PC Magazine and other mainstreamers also printed the same news.

It's unfortunate as Intel puts out some of the highest quality, most reliable motherboards on the market...



jchambers28

join:2007-05-12
Alma, AR

pc perspective had full coverage as well.



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to mromero

From BMR: »benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?o···Itemid=8



pnjunction
Teksavvy Extreme
Premium
join:2008-01-24
Toronto, ON
kudos:1

2 edits

Sorry still not buying the 'end of desktops is near' BS. His headline is blatantly misleading. "Desktop PC: Intel Says the End is Near" meanwhile their statement says "The Desktop segment continues to be a major focus for Intel".

Bottom line is few people were buying Intel motherboards for various reasons and so it made no sense to keep making them.

"What this means to consumers is that desktop PC enthusiasts will still have options, but only as many as vendors such as ASUS, GIGABYTE, and MSI can afford to produce"

He makes it sound like that these guys aren't offering many choices. If anything they are offering too many. I could see that as the desktop market slows (slows NOT 'dies') they will just pare it down a bit to be more efficient. If I look at Z77 on newegg I see:

ASUS (25)
GIGABYTE (23)
ASRock (19)
MSI (10)
Intel (7)

We'll be just fine. Most people probably wouldn't even have noticed Intel dropping off the bottom of that list if they hadn't heard about it.



urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

said by pnjunction:

Bottom line is few people were buying Intel motherboards for various reasons and so it made no sense to keep making them.

You're probably right... At the end of the day the kids want the whizbang new features and don't really give a shit who engineers the better products. Your average basement computer fixer' doesn't see the RMA rates of ASRock or ASUS, so they push the average clueless home owner onto whatever latest board has the longest list of features rather than what's the most reliable for them.

Intel had a sliver of the market pie so it would make sense for them to close up shop in that department.


pnjunction
Teksavvy Extreme
Premium
join:2008-01-24
Toronto, ON
kudos:1

I have bought MSI, Asus and Asrock boards. I have never needed to RMA a board for a hardware fault, but I have needed to flash firmware updates to fix serious issues. If there is anything they need to do a better job on it is probably firmware.

If they pared down their SKU list they could probably do a better job of testing and firmware. 20+ options for one chipset is ridiculous, it should be maybe half a dozen. 3 variants, budget/value/premium, for each of uATX and ATX is enough to reach most consumers. Then maybe an extreme ATX (ie the ones with tons of PCIe x16 slots and fancy audio chips on board) and an ITX option.



urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3

Edit: (somehow site double posted)



urbanriot
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join:2004-10-18
Canada
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Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to pnjunction

Ideal for me would be 3 variants x 2 (business and residential) x 3 form factors (mitx, matx, atx) = 18, which I feel is just right, so I agree that over 20 is probably silly.

... well, I'd personally like to knock out 'budget' and 'value' from the business line but really, most businesses want the cheapest disposable garbage they can get, despite the necessity to pay IT even more than the money they're saving on low cost systems.


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to mromero

Intel still made motherboards? I haven't seen one in years.



pnjunction
Teksavvy Extreme
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join:2008-01-24
Toronto, ON
kudos:1
reply to urbanriot

Value is a useful segment.

I opened my mom's Dell computer that I good a really good deal on (i5-2320, 8gb ram, radeon 6450 for $600 a year ago, tried and couldn't beat that build on newegg) and the mobo is stripped right down with only 2 sata ports and 2 ram slots.

No way would I put that in a computer for myself but for my mom, who cares? She's never going to need more than 16gb ram or extra drives. That's the case for many users.



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to me1212

Then you have not tried to look - »www.newegg.com/Product/ProductLi···me=Intel

The only manufacturer of Intel boards at NewEgg, that has more models is Asus, Intel is second.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to mromero

ASUS responds: »www.tomshardware.com/news/asus-i···670.html



Boricua
Premium
join:2002-01-26
Sacramuerto
reply to pnjunction

said by pnjunction:

Value is a useful segment.

I opened my mom's Dell computer that I good a really good deal on (i5-2320, 8gb ram, radeon 6450 for $600 a year ago, tried and couldn't beat that build on newegg) and the mobo is stripped right down with only 2 sata ports and 2 ram slots.

No way would I put that in a computer for myself but for my mom, who cares? She's never going to need more than 16gb ram or extra drives. That's the case for many users.

And that's why Intel thinks "the end is near" for desktops. They are seeing that mobos will become more of a niche as people (in general) will buy a desktop outright because of the cost factor instead of building.
--
Illegal aliens have always been a problem in the United States. Ask any Indian. Robert Orben


pnjunction
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Toronto, ON
kudos:1

said by Boricua:

And that's why Intel thinks "the end is near" for desktops. They are seeing that mobos will become more of a niche as people (in general) will buy a desktop outright because of the cost factor instead of building.

While the value segment can satisfy most users, I wouldn't underestimate the money that can still be made from custom PCs and gamers.

It surprises even me that it is worth the R&D cost for AMD and Nvidia to crank out these high-end GPUs that are mostly only used by gamers. I'm sure the rise of 3D rendering for media and GPU computing (and consoles to some extent) has helped them spread the costs but still. If it is worth it for them to make those huge custom ASICs, it will be worth it for Intel to provide the CPU options (that share R&D with server/workstation CPUs) and companies like Asus to put together the motherboards.

Most everybody has a hard on for the exploding volume in phones and tablets, but you're looking at $20-40 for an SoC that does pretty much all the computing in those things. Meanwhile a gaming CPU and GPU will both sell for $150-$500+.


n1zuk
making really tiny tech things
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join:2001-10-24
Malta
kudos:2

said by pnjunction:

It surprises even me that it is worth the R&D cost for AMD and Nvidia to crank out these high-end GPUs that are mostly only used by gamers.

Today's bleeding edge is next year's discount bin. And in 2 or so years, the base for the budget line offering.

Stop innovating, and you'll be out of business in no time.
--
Smoke 'em if you got 'em


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
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Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to pnjunction

said by pnjunction:

It surprises even me that it is worth the R&D cost for AMD and Nvidia to crank out these high-end GPUs that are mostly only used by gamers.

The workstation segment uses many workstation versions of some of the same GPU's as the desktop segment. The GF108 GPU was used right across the board in ever segment, from gamer cards, value cards, enthusiest mobility, workstation mobility and workstation Quadro's.


ccallana
Huh?
Premium,VIP
join:2000-08-03
Folsom, CA
reply to mromero

......."Don't freak out," pleaded Dallman. "This isn't the end of anything. If you can get people to read the entire announcement, the emphasis is on the importance of the desktop. It is one of our top money-makers. We are taking resources and redeploying them. We are going to be putting a lot of money into new all-in-one [desktop] technology reducing the cost of touch [technology on desktop systems] and bringing new perceptual computing and voice commands to the desktop."

The PC innovation offensive is aimed at getting Intel out of the stale "gray square box" PC business, said Dallman. "At some point in time if that didn't change, if new, exciting formats weren't developed and brought to market, that part of the business would die," he said. "What we are trying to do now is take the resources that we have and use them to develop new innovative products for desktops."

From one of the VPs - »www.crn.com/news/components-peri···ards.htm
--
"We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us.... We are far too easily pleased." C.S. Lewis