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nyrrule27

join:2007-12-06
Howell, NJ

Paint a room. primer or no primer

I know there are alot of paints now a days that have primer in them. are they any good or should i just paint the traditional way with primer and paint seperate. if i go that route should i tint the primer. the walls and celing are white.

Im also going to paint the celing and walls the same color.

Any input would help.

Thanks



Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2

Tint the primer, and then 2 coats of paint. It makes a big difference in the quality of the job.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to nyrrule27

Is this new construction or are you repainting?



The E
Please allow me to retort
Premium
join:2002-05-26
Burnaby, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to nyrrule27

The new primer-and-paints are fantastic. Actually, most quality paints have more or less had almost this level of coverage for years now.

The only time primer is really all that necessary in an interior setting is if:

A) it's new plaster or drywall. It needs to be sealed with a good primer coat first, then painted with one or two coats.

B) There's oil-based paint on the walls, and you're going to paint with latex. Even then, you should scuff-sand the existing paint to assist with adhesion.

C) There's a dramatic difference in existing and new colours. Say the existing walls are white and you'll be painting a dark, navy blue. Tinted primer is the way to go, otherwise you'll likely end up slapping three coats of paint on.

D) If there's nicotine, cooking stains (grease) or water damage. These conditions usually "bleed through" latex paints. They should be primed with a heavy-duty primer sealer like Kilz or Binz, etc.

I think that pretty much covers it….
--
"All opinions stated by me are solely my views and do not reflect the views of my employer, this site, or even myself depending on my level of sanity at the moment"


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

I'll add one more

E) There's currently latex-based paint and you're going to paint with alkyd (oil).


bemis

join:2008-07-18
Reading, MA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to nyrrule27

I'm painting stained trim around my house. I went and bought Sherwin Williams expensive primer and trim paint...

What I found is that i have to prime 2X, sometimes 3X, allowing a day between coats to get effective blocking of the colored stain. Then I then need 1-2 coats of white gloss trim paint to get a consistent looking white cover. In one case the tanins from the wood still bled through after a few weeks so I needed yet another re-coat of trim.

For my porch door I decided to use Behr Ultra Primer+Paint exterior paint (white) because I had some left over from doing the door jambs (which were already painted white). I primed first with SW because it was handy, next day it was the typical color bleeding in various spots... I decided to go straight for the Behr at this point, and I was surprised to see after a day no color bleeding... a week later... still nothing. When I did the interior trim for the door I just used straight Behr paint... it seems to be doing a great job (after a week) of staying adhered to the previously stained surface and had good coverage.

So I think those primer + paints can be good at sticking, coverage, and consistency. If I hadn't already painted every room in my house I would certainly be considering them.



Grumpy
Premium
join:2001-07-28
NW CT
Reviews:
·Comcast
·AT&T Yahoo
·Callcentric
reply to nyrrule27

A little off topic, but if you buy one of these, you'll be very glad you did:

I favor a high quality brush. They make life easier and produce better results. That's not to say I won't use a fifty cent brush for small oil jobs when warranted, but anyway...

I tend to stick to Purdy, Wooster Alpha, some Coronas, and so on.

A paint guy recommended one of these a month or so ago:

»www.thepaintstore.com/Proform_Pi···/329.htm

Picasso brushes. As far as cutting an edge - like nothing I've ever used. Incredible brush. I free hand edged a pantry's trim with 3 doors and a built cabinet. It almost looks like a laser guided paint brush did the cutting, and I am not a pro by any means. My local True Value sells them.

»www.jackpauhl.com/picasso-pic1-2···visited/

»www.proformtech.com/

A 2.5 inch sash brush cost me around $10. Can't remember the exact price.



djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO
reply to nyrrule27

I swear by the Behr Ultra stuff now. When we rented out our old house, we went over a deep red accent wall with a light taupe in one coat. It never bled through. I was impressed.

We then proceeded to paint our new home with it. We were prepared to do a second coat, but we couldn't find a reason to. Everything dried up consistent and clean. It's been about 2 years now and it's held up great.
--
AT&T U-Hearse - RIP Unlimited Internet 1995-2011
Rethink Billable.



Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by djrobx:

I swear by the Behr Ultra stuff now. When we rented out our old house, we went over a deep red accent wall with a light taupe in one coat. It never bled through. I was impressed.

We then proceeded to paint our new home with it. We were prepared to do a second coat, but we couldn't find a reason to. Everything dried up consistent and clean. It's been about 2 years now and it's held up great.

We use Behr Ultra as well. It seems to do a very nice job for the price. A few times a year they put it on sale for like $5 less a gallon. July 4th is one of those times.
--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!

Valerie

join:2013-03-14
Neillsville, WI
reply to nyrrule27

Hi everyone! Nice to meet you all!

Applying primer to a surface before painting has several advantages. Primarily, priming will help prepare an exterior for painting. The paint will stick longer and better compared to unprimed walls. Moreover, it allows color tones to stay true and vivid.