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ohreally

@claranet.co.uk
reply to FFH5

Re: Use someone else's infrastructure, promises worthless

said by FFH5:

When your provider uses infrastructure provided by others, performance promises are worthless.

The only bit of infrastructure they use that is provided by others is backhaul from exchange to their network(where they can specify the bandwidth that they want to pay for) and the copper lines from the exchange to the home (which obviously will not be congested as this is ADSL2). Sky uses their own DSLAMs.

It's nothing to do with using other people's infrastructure, it's a problem in not buying enough backhaul to cope with demand.


xsbell

join:2008-12-22
Canada
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said by ohreally :

The only bit of infrastructure they use that is provided by others is backhaul from exchange to their network(where they can specify the bandwidth that they want to pay for) and the copper lines from the exchange to the home (which obviously will not be congested as this is ADSL2). Sky uses their own DSLAMs.

It's nothing to do with using other people's infrastructure, it's a problem in not buying enough backhaul to cope with demand.

I highly doubt it has anything to do with transit (what you call backhaul, unless you're talking about DSLAM uplinks), as it is pretty inexpensive and easy to get at any exchange/carrier hotel, the problem will always be at the last mile (DSLAM uplink(s)).

You obviously have no idea what you're talking about if you think that there won't be any congestion at the SLAM. And what does the ADSL2 standard have to do with this?

Sky are still probably using legacy DSLAMs fed with slow ATM links. It's time for them to upgrade and switch to the Ethernet aggregated era.


ohreally

@threembb.co.uk
said by xsbell:

I highly doubt it has anything to do with transit (what you call backhaul, unless you're talking about DSLAM uplinks), as it is pretty inexpensive and easy to get at any exchange/carrier hotel, the problem will always be at the last mile (DSLAM uplink(s)).

I am referring to DSLAM uplinks - calling it "backhaul" is fairly common. (indeed, if you look at the presentation I refer to, even Sky/Easynet call it "backhaul")

said by xsbell:

You obviously have no idea what you're talking about if you think that there won't be any congestion at the SLAM. And what does the ADSL2 standard have to do with this?

You seem to be "flying off the handle" without properly digesting what I said. I said "the copper lines from the exchange/DSLAM to the home" - i.e. the local loop - would never be congested, because that's the nature of the beast (there are dedicated connections between the DSLAM and each customer - from the DSLAM upwards it may well not be dedicated).

said by xsbell:

Sky are still probably using legacy DSLAMs fed with slow ATM links. It's time for them to upgrade and switch to the Ethernet aggregated era.

Very unlikely - this presentation from several years ago, when they bought the ISP that brought them into the broadband business, suggests it has been all-IP since at least 2004.
»corporate.sky.com/documents/pdf/···tion.pdf

Since then they've started to move away from the old Easynet network (they sold the company off a few years ago but kept the DSL access parts) and have since embarked on a programme of replacing the Easynet era DSLAMs with something even newer.

As far as I know it's only the incumbent telco (BT) who is still operating an ATM-based DSL network and even that is rapidly being replaced.

I would suggest that you refrain from doubting the knowledge of others unless you get your own facts straight.