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FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to JimThePCGuy

Re: A right?

Not a right - I lean more to a luxury, and if pushed maybe it could be called a utility under a stretch of that term.

LostInWoods

join:2004-04-14
Reviews:
·Windstream
I don't see it being much of a stretch to call broadband access to the internet a utility similar to phone service or power, but not certainly not a right. And with being a utility could and perhaps should come some quality of service regulation, since for most of us there are at most two methods of broadband internet access.


elios

join:2005-11-15
Springfield, MO
reply to FFH5
i could argue the same for running water in the 1800's , power in the early 1900's, telephone in the early to mid 1900's

civilization moves on technology moves on
like it or not

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA
You can survive without internet, telephone, and power. You can survive without running water too, but not without water in general.

They sound luxuries to me.


elios

join:2005-11-15
Springfield, MO
civilizations decided other wise

what you think doesnt matter if the majority think other wise


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to LostInWoods
said by LostInWoods:

I don't see it being much of a stretch to call broadband access to the internet a utility similar to phone service or power, but not certainly not a right.

Phone, power and television (was originally radio) have already been considered "essential" previously and now Internet access is treated in the same way. I don't know how well the German definition of an "essential part of life" compares to the US legal definition of a "right" (there may be overlap, but I don't think they are truly equivalent). From what I know about Germany, things considered "essential" may be subsidized (or fully paid for) for social security recipients and a landlord may not prevent a tenant from owning "essential items" or receiving "essential services". There are also restrictions on the repossession of goods from people in financial difficulties (for example: one working phone and one working television has to remain in the home because of their status as "essential" items).
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Telco

join:2008-12-19
reply to silbaco
You do realize that you are on an tech forum.