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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
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2 edits

HDMI cables

I have an older Monster cable HDMI cable from 2008 that I got on clearance at RadioShack a few years ago. I picked up a $12.99 Dynex cable at Best Buy that says it is high speed with Ethernet.

What does high speed with Ethernet mean? And I would like to know (opinions please) if the Best Buy Dynex cable ($12.99) is just as good as the Monster cable ($79.99, got it on clearance at radio shack for $29.99 a few years ago).

I am using it to hook up a Comcast cable box.

--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.


NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06
said by IowaCowboy:

What does high speed with Ethernet mean? And I would like to know (opinions please) if the Best Buy Dynex cable ($12.99) is just as good as the Monster cable ($79.99, got it on clearance at radio shack for $29.99 a few years ago).

HEC allows for a 100 Mbit/s Ethernet connection between the two HDMI connected devices so they can share an Internet connection. I'd say the "better" cable is the one supporting the latest HDMI spec (presuming the newest if there's any difference at all). For a "basic" connection, though, I'd say each is equally good.
--
"...but ya doesn't hasta call me Johnson!"

HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
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Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to IowaCowboy
Unless your HDMI devices actually support Ethernet transfer via HDMI then it doesn't really matter. Support for Ethernet over HDMI didn't come along until version 1.4 of the HDMI spec.

I have several $2-3 HDMI cables in use here and they work just fine. IIRC, I got 3 for $6, including shipping from Meritline. I also have a few from Monoprice that were very cheap, but only because I was already buying other, heavy items that covered most of the shipping charge.

There's enough HDMI spec info here: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hdmi to give you a headache.

Happydude32
Premium
join:2005-07-16
kudos:1
reply to IowaCowboy
They're all rip offs! Two years ago when I bought all new home entertainment gear, I got five 6' HDMI 1.4 cables, five 6' CAT6 Ethernet cables and 50' of CAT 6 for around $27 bucks including shipping from Monoprice.

Go to a TV studio, you'll never see that overpriced Monster shit in use.


sk1939
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Mclean, VA
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said by Happydude32:

They're all rip offs! Two years ago when I bought all new home entertainment gear, I got five 6' HDMI 1.4 cables, five 6' CAT6 Ethernet cables and 50' of CAT 6 for around $27 bucks including shipping from Monoprice.

Go to a TV studio, you'll never see that overpriced Monster shit in use.

No, but go to a recording studio and you'll find Mogami wire all over. The cable madness originates from the audio world.


ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON
said by sk1939:

No, but go to a recording studio and you'll find Mogami wire all over. The cable madness originates from the audio world.

Actually Mogami, Canare, Gotham sell decent stuff for professional applications that is not ridiculously overpriced. You'll see a lot of star quad used in broadcast. I see lots of Belden, Gepco, Clark, Boston cable in facilities around here as well.

The cable madness originated in the hifi (or should I say "high-futility") world, not in broadcast or recording studios, though there may be some spill over due to owners being duped into thinking the crazy expensive cables provide some "benefit".


sk1939
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Mclean, VA
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Reviews:
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said by ArthurS:

said by sk1939:

No, but go to a recording studio and you'll find Mogami wire all over. The cable madness originates from the audio world.

Actually Mogami, Canare, Gotham sell decent stuff for professional applications that is not ridiculously overpriced. You'll see a lot of star quad used in broadcast. I see lots of Belden, Gepco, Clark, Boston cable in facilities around here as well.

The cable madness originated in the hifi (or should I say "high-futility") world, not in broadcast or recording studios, though there may be some spill over due to owners being duped into thinking the crazy expensive cables provide some "benefit".

The retailers like to price gouge you on the cost of said cable though. I went to get a pair of 15ft Mogami's from AMS and they wanted $55/ea.


ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON

2 edits
said by sk1939:

The retailers like to price gouge you on the cost of said cable though. I went to get a pair of 15ft Mogami's from AMS and they wanted $55/ea.

If you compare similarly constructed cables from various manufacturers (star quad cable, neutrik connectors), you'll find the price differences are not that extreme. Do some comparison shopping here:
»www.markertek.com/Cables/Audio-C···ec.xhtml

AMS doesn't have that great of a selection of cables it seems, only listing a top of the line mogami cable or cheap CBI cables that even I wouldn't buy! Hard to make fair comparisons on their website.


Robotics
See You On The Dark Side
Premium
join:2003-10-23
Louisa, VA
reply to IowaCowboy
I like monster mainly because of the way they are made. They are rigid. I had a 15ft. HDMI from best buy (don't recall the brand name) and after two years of use, it shorted out where the cable hits the part you hold to plug and unplug the cable. This was the end that was plugged into my TV, which never moved. I guess the weight of the cable trying to do a 90 from the back of the TV and down to the cable box caused it to short.

This wont happen with monster cables (and maybe other "better" cables out there). Their (Monster) end pieces are metal, the outer jacket is more rigid, and the type wire inside and how its wound inside will make it last much much longer.

I would try to stay away from lower price cables that best buy has on their shelf. Spending a little extra I feel will save you grief down the road.
Picture quality wise, I honestly cant say I see a difference, so not sure on that subject.

On another note, Monster cables are far better when it comes to leakage in signal within the cable.
I have found this out since I have a scanner radio near where the cable is. I don't hear noise on the scanner anymore with the Monster cable, but with the one I had from best buy, I had to lock out a few channels on the scanner due to the constant noise.
--
Long you live and high you fly, and smiles you'll give and tears you'll cry,
and all you touch and all you see, is all your life will ever be.


ImpldConsent
Under Siege
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Mcdonough, GA
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said by Robotics:

I like monster mainly because of the way they are made. ... Monster cables are far better when it comes to leakage in signal within the cable.

You drank the water too? Why all HDMI cables are the same. 1-word: monoprice
--
That's "MISTER" Kafir to you.


Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2
reply to IowaCowboy
When it comes to a digital signal (HDMI is all digital), the signal is either passed completely or it isn't. Monster cables will not give you a better picture than a monoprice cable. (I can't speak for Dynex crap)

And on that note, the new Redmere cables from monoprice are flat out amazing. Longer runs, thinner cables, and still at a fraction of the price of Monster. (and dynex for that matter)


ImpldConsent
Under Siege
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Mcdonough, GA
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said by Camelot One:

And on that note, the new Redmere cables from monoprice are flat out amazing. Longer runs, thinner cables, and still at a fraction of the price of Monster. (and dynex for that matter)

I agree with Redmere. I went out on a limb a paid the extra $1.00 for Redmere recently based on being thinner - nothing else. That was a personal preference, not a technical preference.
--
That's "MISTER" Kafir to you.


ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON
reply to Robotics
said by Robotics:

I like monster mainly because of the way they are made. They are rigid. I had a 15ft. HDMI from best buy (don't recall the brand name) and after two years of use, it shorted out where the cable hits the part you hold to plug and unplug the cable. This was the end that was plugged into my TV, which never moved. I guess the weight of the cable trying to do a 90 from the back of the TV and down to the cable box caused it to short.

However the flip side of this is having a cable too rigid that there is no "give" for the connector it's plugged into. The majority of electronic components have connectors soldered directly to the printed circuit board, the problem is that many of these manufacturers "cheap out" and hardly do anything to secure the connector to the chassis. So after a while, your stiff and expensive cable is actually causing stress on the soldered connections on the printed circuit board, eventually causing failure here. DAMHIK!

What is important is to find a cable with adequate strain relief, and at the same time don't do anything crazy to contort the cable into sharp angles that will eventually cause failure in the electronics and/or cable.


Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2
said by ArthurS:

However the flip side of this is having a cable too rigid that there is no "give" for the connector it's plugged into.

I ran into this last week. Had to replace a guy's receiver because the bend in his rigid HDMI cable broke loose the connector inside the receiver.


ImpldConsent
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Mcdonough, GA
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I did the same thing - wall mounted TV, installed (yet another cheap hi-speed HDMI cable), push it back on wall - bend. Ruined that cable. I then bought a HDMI Port Saver (Male to Female) - 90 Degree and all is well. I also saw some swivel-head HDMI as well.
--
That's "MISTER" Kafir to you.


Robotics
See You On The Dark Side
Premium
join:2003-10-23
Louisa, VA
reply to ArthurS
I agree. And I will for now on use the cable strap on the back of my big screen meant just for this purpose. (live and learn)

I looked into the other cables most seem to be talking about here. And I will continue to use Monster brand cables when it comes to HDMI.

Just the fact a lot of their cable require a ferrite core (more weight for one) says a lot.
Even their own words hint to the problem:
"They are used to suppress EMI/RFI electronic noise on the cable by absorbing the unwanted high frequencies and dissipating them as very low-level heat. This is the simplest and cheapest form of electronic noise reduction and is most effective on small gauge cabling, which is inherently more susceptible to electronic noise interference than thicker cables".

"This is the simplest and cheapest form of electronic noise reduction".

A better way is to make the cable right to begin with. Then you wont have a need to provide a "cheap way" of shielding RFI/EMI

This is just my opinion, and experience, being I am in the communications field and run into this situation often.

What ever works for the individual, is fine.
--
Long you live and high you fly, and smiles you'll give and tears you'll cry,
and all you touch and all you see, is all your life will ever be.


ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON
said by Robotics:

Just the fact a lot of their cable require a ferrite core (more weight for one) says a lot.
Even their own words hint to the problem:
"They are used to suppress EMI/RFI electronic noise on the cable by absorbing the unwanted high frequencies and dissipating them as very low-level heat. This is the simplest and cheapest form of electronic noise reduction and is most effective on small gauge cabling, which is inherently more susceptible to electronic noise interference than thicker cables".

"This is the simplest and cheapest form of electronic noise reduction".

A better way is to make the cable right to begin with. Then you wont have a need to provide a "cheap way" of shielding RFI/EMI

This is just my opinion, and experience, being I am in the communications field and run into this situation often.

What ever works for the individual, is fine.

Ferrite cores have been around for a *very* long time, and are a valid method for the suppression of interference in modern high speed data cables. To judge a cable's worth on whether it uses them or not is utter nonsense! Furthermore their premise on the "thickness" of the cables determining susceptibility of noise interference is dubious at best. A thicker gauge wire means less signal loss (which is pretty inconsequential for the typical home theatre setup where the average cable length is under 20 ft). Interference will enter the wire the same way. What is *more* important in terms of interference rejection is the twisting of the conductors, and the shielding around it, not how thick a cable is. For that matter, you can buy a cable with a very thick rubber/pvc jacket, and assume they work better according to these schmucks. Sorry, you've bought into their snake oil marketing "hook, line, and sinker!"


Camelot One
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join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2
reply to Robotics
said by Robotics:

I looked into the other cables most seem to be talking about here. And I will continue to use Monster brand cables when it comes to HDMI.

While I disagree with your opinion, I am very glad you feel that way. The profit Best Buy makes on you helps keep their stores open, and I rather enjoy window shopping there.


ImpldConsent
Under Siege
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Mcdonough, GA
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reply to Robotics
Click for full size
AudioQuest 16m crap at Buy.com
Click for full size
Monoprice.com 60' with RedMere
I know we beat this thing to death, but I was curious on what companies are doing to screw consumers. I think this is a great example. Note - it's monoprice's most expensive 60' HDMI cable (yea, yea, 16m=52f -- I rounded up). Let me know where (besides price - and - gee - free shipping from Buy.com) you'll find technical differences.
--
That's "MISTER" Kafir to you.


Vchat20
Landing is the REAL challenge
Premium
join:2003-09-16
Columbus, OH
reply to IowaCowboy
As other have already stated and pretty much covered ad nauseam in this forum is this: HDMI is all digital. It works or it doesn't. And if it doesn't, rarely is it ever the cost or quality of the cable that comes into question but some form of rare defect or caused by what is connected to either ends of the cable.

Along those lines, many people (including myself) swear by Monoprice for not only HDMI cables but any cable in particular. I have bought many over the years from short to long (including a good 50 footer) ethernet cables, Toslink, HDMI, Component, etc.. for very cheap and they still have great build quality regardless and have never failed me. One I have had is an in-wall braided sheath which I bought back in 2008 when I got my first flat screen and it's still connected today. Little stiff and in hindsight with added experience I would have went with a standard cable but it works!
--
I swear, some people should have pace-makers installed to free up the resources. Breathing and heart beat taxes their whole system, all of their brain cells wasted on life support.-two bit brains, and the second bit is wasted on parity! ~head_spaz

Happydude32
Premium
join:2005-07-16
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reply to Camelot One
said by Camelot One:

said by Robotics:

I looked into the other cables most seem to be talking about here. And I will continue to use Monster brand cables when it comes to HDMI.

While I disagree with your opinion, I am very glad you feel that way. The profit Best Buy makes on you helps keep their stores open, and I rather enjoy window shopping there.

Agreed. Best Buy is great for show rooming. Connected my phone a Big Jambox, played a few songs, I was blown away by the sound quality, ordered one on Amazon for $30 less and no tax when I got home that night, that was a $55 savings. Two years ago when I bought my TV, I went to the local Best Buy that has a Magnolia Center, checked out the TV, I was impressed with it and ordered it on Tiger for $1,000 less. When the new model of 3D glasses came out, I went to Best Buy, tried them on, made sure they were comfortable and as I was walking out the store ordered them on Amazon on my phone for $25 less with no tax. Last year, I was looking at getting a new Home Theater Power Center from APC. Had one in my hands at Best Buy, on the way to the checkout something in my head told me to check my phone. I logged on to Amazon, they had the one model better for $100 less. Guess which one I ended up getting?

Bust Buy’s days are numbered.
--
iPhone: 4” 1136 X 640 Display, 1.30 GHz Dual Core Processor, 1 GB RAM
MyPhone: 5” 1920 X 1080 Display, 1.50 GHz Quad Core Processor, 2 GB RAM
So tell me, why is exactly is the iPhone so great?
Droid Does What Jobs Won’t Let You Do.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
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join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to ArthurS
said by ArthurS:

The majority of electronic components have connectors soldered directly to the printed circuit board, the problem is that many of these manufacturers "cheap out" and hardly do anything to secure the connector to the chassis. So after a while, your stiff and expensive cable is actually causing stress on the soldered connections on the printed circuit board, eventually causing failure here. DAMHIK!

What is important is to find a cable with adequate strain relief, and at the same time don't do anything crazy to contort the cable into sharp angles that will eventually cause failure in the electronics and/or cable.

My new Sony KDL46HX750 TV has almost all of the key inputs except analogue inputs, parallel to the wall and perpendicular (at 90 degrees) to the screen, obviating the need for 90 degree bends in cables.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to ArthurS
said by ArthurS:

Ferrite cores have been around for a *very* long time, and are a valid method for the suppression of interference in modern high speed data cables.

I recall them on the earliest computer modem and power cables I had back in the 1980's.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

My new Sony KDL46HX750 TV has almost all of the key inputs except analogue inputs, parallel to the wall and perpendicular (at 90 degrees) to the screen, obviating the need for 90 degree bends in cables.

Almost all of the current TVs have switched to that orientation, mostly to allow the over-all display to be thinner. It is usually at the receiver end that you run into a problem.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
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Springfield, MA
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reply to Happydude32
said by Happydude32:

said by Camelot One:

said by Robotics:

I looked into the other cables most seem to be talking about here. And I will continue to use Monster brand cables when it comes to HDMI.

While I disagree with your opinion, I am very glad you feel that way. The profit Best Buy makes on you helps keep their stores open, and I rather enjoy window shopping there.

Agreed. Best Buy is great for show rooming. Connected my phone a Big Jambox, played a few songs, I was blown away by the sound quality, ordered one on Amazon for $30 less and no tax when I got home that night, that was a $55 savings. Two years ago when I bought my TV, I went to the local Best Buy that has a Magnolia Center, checked out the TV, I was impressed with it and ordered it on Tiger for $1,000 less. When the new model of 3D glasses came out, I went to Best Buy, tried them on, made sure they were comfortable and as I was walking out the store ordered them on Amazon on my phone for $25 less with no tax. Last year, I was looking at getting a new Home Theater Power Center from APC. Had one in my hands at Best Buy, on the way to the checkout something in my head told me to check my phone. I logged on to Amazon, they had the one model better for $100 less. Guess which one I ended up getting?

Bust Buy’s days are numbered.

I shop at Best Buy all the time as it is one of my favorite places to shop. A few of my recent purchases at Best Buy are a Wii U console, HDMI cable, screen protector for my iPad and iPad Mini (along with Geek Squad installation), cases for my iPad and iPad Mini, etc.

I prefer to shop at Brick & Mortar stores as you can actually inspect the packaging before you buy. If the box is damaged, then it is likely the contents are damaged and you can say "No Sale". I have bought stuff online and have had issues with damaged merchandise and items arriving looking like they have been through a flood. Plus I avoid shipping charges. I do shop online occasionally for items not available locally from brick & mortar stores such as specialty items like burglar alarm components (homesecuritystore[dot]com, CPAP Items that are not covered by my insurance (CPAP[dot]com), and Chicago Cubs and Iowa Hawkeyes merchandise (such as T-Shirts, outerwear, etc. since they are not available locally).

Best Buy, Sears, and Target are among my favorite places to shop. I am not a big fan of Walmart as you can wait a couple of hours in line to check out one item. I also do occasionally shop at Radio Shack. I also like to buy clothing at Kohl's and Macy's (although shopping for clothing is one of my least favorite activities).
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.

Happydude32
Premium
join:2005-07-16
kudos:1
You do realize you overpaid for all of that, right? And who cares about shipping charges, look at the final price. I’m thinking about getting a Beats Pill portable Bluetooth Speaker to compliment by Big Jambox. Best Buy wants $200 + tax, that’s $217.50. I can get it on Amazon for $174 + $7 shipping, $0 tax, that’s $181. So what is the point of spending $36 more on the same exact item?

Last month, I bought a bunch of Kindle Fire HDs at Best Buy for people at work to give as Christmas presents to their relatives. I’ll buy whatever someone wants for anyone as long as they pay me back so I can accumulate more cash back reward points on my credit card. Thanks to that I also accumulated like $50 worth of Best Buy Reward Zone certificates. Last weekend I went to Best Buy looking for something to get, and everything is so grossly overpriced it was hard work actually finding something in there to buy when your choices are extremely limited compared to eBay or the Amazon Marketplace. I ended up buying a few movies on Blu Ray and some UFC video game for Xbox Kinect.

And I am so sick and tired of them shoving their extended warranty scams down my throat. It used to be when I was an idiot and bought something more than a few dollars there like a DVD Player or satellite radio receiver they’d bug you about an extended warranty. Now they offer warranties on movies and video games for $2 per title. You think the sales dummy would have learned that I didn’t want that shit after declining it on the video game and the first movie, but he proceeded to ask me for each of the four other blu rays I bought.

Like I said Best Buy is only useful for showrooming, and you really can’t buy anything remotely high end in that place. Anything midlevel or above requires you to go to a Mag location. I was actually going to buy my last Blu Ray player there, but out of the four area Best Buys only one features a Magnolia section and apparently a $250 Sony Blu Ray player is too high end for normal Best Buys. The one Mag location was sold out, I could have had it shipped to the store in 3-5 business days. Fuck ‘em! Tiger had it for the same price, so I ordered it there and saved the tax.
--
Dale Jr, Riding Daddys Coattails Since February 18, 2001!


printscreen

join:2003-11-01
Juana Diaz, PR
Reviews:
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·Coqui/PRTC
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

My new Sony KDL46HX750 TV has almost all of the key inputs except analogue inputs, parallel to the wall and perpendicular (at 90 degrees) to the screen, obviating the need for 90 degree bends in cables.

It actually makes more sense to put the connectors facing down on a flat-screen TV since they are often hung on a wall or placed above the the other components in a cabinet or table. The cables and connectors are strained only by their own weight in the direction they are strongest and are not bent around and strained at right angles. My 5 year-old Vizio HDTV has the all connectors facing down.