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luisortega

join:2010-08-31
Osceola, IA

Paint recommendations

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I have a spare bedroom now with the walls painted a light purple and the ceiling a dark purple. I'd really rather spend more upfront on some good paint and only have to go over it once. With as dark as the ceiling is I'm not sure that's possible.

I know how much everyone here loves pics so I've attached a couple, but the real color is a shade or two darker than how the pictures came out.

Anybody have any recommendations for a good kind/brand that will cover it up in one pass?


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
Based on the sheen and texture, I'm going to say it's likely an oil-based paint that's on there now...

One coat to cover? Depends what colour you want to cover with...

If you want to go the traditional white on the ceiling, I'm saying probably two coats of good, high-blocking primer (I like Bin stuff, something like a Killz or a 1-2-3) followed by 1-2 coats of a quality paint (Benjamin Moore).

But I'm not a painter - I've flipped a few houses, and had to cover stuff like that in the past... If there's a better way, I'd like to know it, myself!


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to luisortega
What color(s) are you going to be painting? If they are the same darkness, you might be able to get away with a single coat. But if they are lighter, or worse you want the similar light shade on both the wall and ceiling, you're going to have to prime most likely.

Look at it this way, even if you don't have to apply 2 coats, you'd probably get a truer color with two coats. Would you rather apply 2 coats of a quality ~$30-50 paint? Or would you rather one coat of a $20 primer and $30-50 paint? You're time is going to be about the same either way.


jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to luisortega
You will never cover a dark color with one coat unless you are keeping the same color or a very similar shade.

Plan on two or maybe even three coats for a uniform appearance.

If you're changing the colors dramatically, start with a good brand of primer tinted to match the new color, then give it a coat of your finish shade. Let it dry and decide if it looks good enough.

Chances are it will need a third coat if the final finish color shift is drastic compared to the base color.
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cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to LazMan
said by LazMan:

Based on the sheen and texture, I'm going to say it's likely an oil-based paint that's on there now...

It's a little hard to tell texture just from the picture. Almost all of my walls have a texture like that. I don't know what the technical name for the technique, but it's like they loaded up a roller too much and took a single swipe down, leaving the peaks to dry. PITA to patch or repair as you can't duplicate the texture really. Plus it makes it look like you did a chitty paint job.

luisortega

join:2010-08-31
Osceola, IA
I think it probably will be a lighter color. I was just hoping that someone with more knowledge or experience with paint would know of some magic stuff so I wouldn't have to spend anymore time than I had to at this. Painting blows


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
said by luisortega:

Painting blows

It beats ripping down old vinyl wallpaper, scraping all the paper backing that remained after you peeled the vinyl off, patching all the nicks after scraping off the paper, and THEN painting.

luisortega

join:2010-08-31
Osceola, IA
I have to say as much as I dislike painting I'm very thankful that wallpaper is something I've never had to deal with.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to cdru
said by cdru:

said by luisortega:

Painting blows

It beats ripping down old vinyl wallpaper, scraping all the paper backing that remained after you peeled the vinyl off, patching all the nicks after scraping off the paper, and THEN painting.

Don't remind me. I have to do that to the bathroom. I have no idea why anyone would vinyl wallpaper a bathroom.
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IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to cdru
said by cdru:

It's a little hard to tell texture just from the picture. Almost all of my walls have a texture like that. I don't know what the technical name for the technique, but it's like they loaded up a roller too much and took a single swipe down, leaving the peaks to dry. PITA to patch or repair as you can't duplicate the texture really. Plus it makes it look like you did a chitty paint job.

Pretty standard rolled stipple finish; at least to my eyes... Basically you thin down joint compound, and roll it out with a heavy paint roller. Hides crappy drywall joints, or bad previous repairs.

And yes, damn near impossible to patch or repair, without it being PAINFULLY obvious...