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John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6

Interesting Article About Kaspersky

Found this while poking around...

»www.brookings.edu/research/opini···hachtman



Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

Am I the only Westerner who finds this troubling, with respect to the widespread and apparently open acceptance of KIS software on so many Western computers?

quote:
But that is the paradox of Eugene Kaspersky: a close associate of the autocratic Putin regime who is charged with safeguarding the data of millions of Americans; a supposedly-retired intelligence officer who is busy today revealing the covert activities of other nations; a vital presence in the open and free Internet who doesn’t want us to be too free.
...
“A substantial part of his company is intimately involved with the FSB,” the tech insider says. While the Russian government has used currency restrictions to cripple a firm’s international business in the past, Kaspersky faces no such interference. “They give him carte blanche for his overseas operations, because he’s among the so-called good companies.”
...
One of the systems Kaspersky is now trying to hack is politics, and his antics are part of the act. Every trip to Shanghai’s Formula One race or the London Conference on Cyberspace is another chance to court diplomats and politicians, another chance to extend his company’s influence. And one of his goals is to persuade policymakers to refashion the Internet into something more to his liking—and, as it happens, something more to the liking of the Putin government as well. ...
For the uninitiated, the FSB is the new face of the KGB/NKVD/Cheka - Russia's secret police.

--
“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.” A. de Tocqueville


Woody79_00
I run Linux am I still a PC?
Premium
join:2004-07-08
united state

1 recommendation

Yeah....i wouldn't use a Russian Security product on any of my computers...no way....I don't trust them, never have, never will. My dad served during the Cold War, was stationed in Berlin for a few years...so perhaps I am biased, but i would never trust any Russia software, let alone security software. JMO...everyone has one.



La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3

^^^ This.

There are too many other choices out there to risk something like this. Maybe being paranoid, but I don't think so. I'm usually pretty flexible, pointedly unparanoid, but I draw the line at certain points.



norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
reply to Blackbird


It's a big article.

One has to ask the question, what of people in the US that worked for 3 letter agencies and post regularly here, do they get excluded from this filter of IT people who worked closely with governments?

He's riding a wave, yes, he wants to clean up the Internet, meeting important people and making more money, etc etc. That doesn't make him a bad man. Does he need more scrutiny because of the money he has made?

At least Woody's reply gives into the notion's he maybe one eyed in the view of the A/V owner.

Is he gaining too much power from his product is anyone's guess but he has never hidden the fact he works closely with the government who used to employ him, and I gather pays him for consultation still. I see him no different to Symantec or any other top tier A/V or operating system owner. The one big plus in his favour is the fact his has never hidden who he works with.

We all have views of our own.
--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke


redwolfe_98
Premium
join:2001-06-11
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

1 recommendation

reply to John Galt

eugene kaspersky's response:

»eugene.kaspersky.com/2012/07/25/···agazine/

eugene kaspersky is one of the good guys..



Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

3 recommendations

reply to norwegian

said by norwegian:

One has to ask the question, what of people in the US that worked for 3 letter agencies and post regularly here, do they get excluded from this filter of IT people who worked closely with governments? ... We all have views of our own.

If Kaspersky was only "posting regularly" here, I'd not be in the least concerned about his 3-letter agency associations, nor would I be about anyone else having 3-letter associations with whatever country... because whatever is dispensed in this forum is only opinion, like yours or mine. But that's neither the issue nor the risk about which I'm concerned. 3-letter-agency posters here (whomever they might be, if any) don't, to my knowledge, head up and guide the efforts of antivirus firms whose presences are widespread on large numbers of Western computers. Antivirus software enjoys a special place on systems, is granted special privileges by users, and works largely out of sight... it necessarily must retain a higher level of trust, both the software and those writing/updating it. The article raises some potentially very serious issues, IMO, involving possible FSB influence or association with Kaspersky and potentially his company's products; his denials referenced in redwolf_98's post are now on record as well. Unfortunately, the question remains for those of us "outside" as to who/what to believe. From my perspective, there's just not enough material evidence (yet) in play to draw a clear conclusion or risk assessment. As to what best one should or should not do, given the issues raised and the denial on record, it's indeed one's own decision to make.

As for me, I will continue listening attentatively to what Kaspersky says about many things related to malware and AVs (he is, after all, an recognized and very knowledgeable expert), but I will not put his company's software on my systems.
--
“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.” A. de Tocqueville


Rebrider
Been There Done That
Premium
join:2000-11-23

++ 1



norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
reply to Blackbird

What I'm trying to say:

EG:
You have an opinion on this because he was employed as a cryptographer by the government, and has ties, this you are concerned over.
I won't debate that.

Microsoft has big ties with the government of it's home too.
ahulett See Profile here has ties with Microsoft and is employed by them and tends to err to the side of his employer - he would be mad not to.

-------

Where can you pick the line between facts and hearsay for any software?
Do you pick open source software only due to it being open to the public, or closed code because you think your data is safer?

We are allowed opinions, and at least half of the posts here are opinions not facts in these types of forums.
I'm just surprised when such an obviously educated person gains a tunnel vision type opinion.
Where do you draw the line.

--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

3 recommendations

said by norwegian:

... I'm just surprised when such an obviously educated person gains a tunnel vision type opinion.
Where do you draw the line.

My "tunnel vision," as you call it, has been shaped by having been a "Cold Warrior" for a fair number of years. I know what 3-letter agencies on both sides of that divide were (and are) capable of. I strongly believe that I'd much rather be on this side than on that side, for what I believe are still very good reasons - even though this side does some things I'm very opposed to. I also believe that 3-letter people rarely, if ever, change their connections, loyalties, practices, or ways of thinking even after "leaving" the profession. Hence I am under no illusions about Mr. Putin, a long-time KGB staffer himself, particularly as I watch what is evolving in the former Soviet Union under his leadership.

I am likewise under no illusions about the FSB and SVR, both split from the KGB and inheriting its staffers, nor about their continuing objectives. The FSB is not the FBI, nor does it operate under anything approaching the same kind of restrictions or constraints. Any organization that has close links or ties to the FSB or Putin did not forge them by the usual kind of bid/contractural arrangements generally followed in the West... that's simply not how State Security in Russia operates. If I'm made aware that an organization or its leadership has signficant links to FSB or SVR, then the potential (and hostile) security risks are simply higher than I choose to run, either now or in some future scenario. My concern lies not just with trusting current software and its "cleanliness", but with the integrity of future automatic signature and program updates that I must allow an AV to obtain and activate on my systems, largely unsupervised.
--
“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.” A. de Tocqueville


dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to John Galt

I have no experience with his software except for Kaspersky Rescue Disc. I used it on 2 separate relative's machines but it didn't work for either one of them so I never thought much of his software.

What worries me is the fact that Microsoft and Cisco embed Kaspersky's code into their software. I'm currently replying from a Windows machine on a Cisco Linksys EA4500 router.
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing



Smokey Bear
veritas odium parit
Premium
join:2008-03-15
Annie's Pub
kudos:4
reply to John Galt

The only I will contribute to the discussion is that I highly respect Eugene Kaspersky.



Tom_Tome

@rr.com
reply to Blackbird

Interesting, I was a "Cold War Warrior" for a number of years as well yet trust Russia over China a country that no doubt has Mfg. a large portion of the parts in your computer. If not Mfg. in China in countries with close ties to China.

It does not matter what 3 letter agencies you throw out there they are all out to get away with whatever they can and generally do especially in the US and Russia.



norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
reply to Blackbird

said by Blackbird:

My "tunnel vision," as you call it, has been shaped by having been a "Cold Warrior" for a fair number of years.

Fair enough, then your opinion is a legitimate one, and to be honest, I've enjoyed your comments extensively here, so will say no more.

However, while it might sound like I was having a dig, it was an attempt to highlight programming etc of all nations and work ethics and the software of any company in any country. You could also say the same about tradesmen too, they are good or bad, or somewhere in between, how do you know without experience or knowledge on these.

Still it was quite a good write up all the same, and I enjoyed it, and will have a more in-depth read later.

Cheers for the post John.

--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



ashrc4
Premium
join:2009-02-06
australia
reply to John Galt

quote:
The accumulation happens automatically. When a user installs Kaspersky software, it scans every application, file, and email on the computer for signs of malicious activity. If it finds a piece of known malware, it deletes it. If it encounters a suspicious program or a message it doesn’t recognize—and the user has opted to be part of the Kaspersky Security Network—it sends an encrypted sample of the virus to the company’s servers. The cloud-based system automatically checks the code against a “whitelist” of 300 million software objects it knows to be trustworthy......"

quote:
For Kaspersky, exposing Flame reflects his company’s broader ambition: to serve as a global crime-stopper and peacekeeper. Malware has evolved from a nuisance to a criminal tool to an instrument of the state, he says, so naturally he and his malware fighters have grown in stature and influence too. “My goal is not to earn money. Money is like oxygen: Good idea to have enough, but it’s not the target,” he says. “The target is to save the world.”

Although the meat in the sandwich for the average user seems to be with Kaspersky sending data encrypted (apparently just for samples for identifying unknown software) the thing that bothers me is an AV company that has the power to readily identify new software of any kind and whitelist/blacklist all.
With his supposed aspirations Microsoft should harness this type of potential and incorporate a whitelist of it's own. Saying goodbye to AV's.
Are we not tied of the growing list of daily 1000's of signatures and and heuristic engine updates for what is an essentially flawed method of patching signatures after the events have occurred.
Before the connected AV industry pulls any of the strings espoused.
Just saying



--
Paradigm Shift beta test pilot. "Dying to defend one's small piece of suburb...Give me something global...STAT!


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

1 recommendation

reply to John Galt

Thanks for that.

If anyone hasn't seen Kubrick's wonderful Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, I recommend it. Then re-read the articles ESPECIALLY after watching the actor portray Comrade Ambassador Sadesky (He'll see the big board!).

IMHO, Never, ever, trust a russian. Especially in these times (Putin ex-KGB, AntiUS rhetoric with adoptions, etc...).

"..registered holdings in Great Britain in 2006..." Um, he does realize that it was a British Bank that the US held accountable for laundering money with terrorists..right? And the banker was extremely arrogant toward US "three letter" organizations. Don't forget the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko...in Britain...

"three largest security companies...Symantec, Kapersky, McAfee.." I would hardly call them that since they are the first ones that fail at protecting where the little guys don't. And the three bloatwares (resource hogging, higher false-positives...).

About FLAME...I think being first isn't always about security and more about bragging rights. Commercial-extortion when it comes to finding it first, leveraging security services to companies, at a price...

Our mission to fight cybercrime...(something missing here, oh yeah, russian mafia--you can steal from all but the homeland-never from your own.) Seeing that much start in the Ukraine, and other former soviet blocs... you could be technically correct.

Yeah, how about getting those outspoken girl band members out of the gulag. I mean, if you are that sincere about freedom and security, those girls were punished the KGB way...

I like Wired. it's not investigative journalism like Washington Post was...but its more entertaining than someone with a personal agenda...
--
Splat