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dsl2u

join:2012-05-16
CANADA
Reviews:
·FreePhoneLine
reply to dsl2u

Re: Apartment buildings: Why don't they convert to VOIP?

> that is against the rules and will put the operator in hot water if something goes wrong.

Rules of what? Is there a rule that stipulates everybody has to have 911 access? What if people don't have a phone line at all? I'm in Canada but I presume the laws are similar here as the US.

I see 911 is a big issue so you have to definitely isolate yourself from that completely so the tenant understands this is not a phone in the traditional sense of the word. A cell phone is far more effective for 911 than a land line. Also a deactivated cell phone with no number is untraceable which is often what people yearn for when reporting suspicious activity to the police in your neighborhood. The police can be so sloppy in keeping your information private; many couldn't care less. Your only protection is when they have no way of identifying you (besides the sound of your voice) through caller ID/address linkage.

Regarding registering as a phone company, I wonder what makes something a phone company? You could offer it as simply an internet package of some sort to separate yourself further from phone issues.

> In fact, with this sort of arrangement it would be an excellent idea to bundle Internet and phone service together so you can ensure building-wide QoS to keep the phone calls clear.

Yes, that's exactly what I was thinking as well. One affects the other; they are utterly intertwined.

As for the monopoly, I hadn't thought of that yet our building here is a monopoly and one company has far more control than the other. Guess you can always divest yourself from a monopoly. But how about just going with the internet service of whoever supplies it? Both DSL and cable should be able to supply the necessary bandwith if setup correctly.

I'd like to offer internet service restricting bandwith of torrent and video sites since those 2 things seem to use up almost all of the bandwith in most situations and many people use neither. They'd gladly halve their bill with those restrictions. You could still watch the video - you'd just have to wait a bit for it to load. It would discourage aimless Youtube browsing. And torrent endless downloading. One could accumulate movies on a server for the building (classics from the past for example) so there were no issues with copyright. Then parents wouldn't have to worry about the content. Also documentaries - their content should be safe 99% of the time.

Also people could opt to record different security cameras with their computer around the building for their own curiosity, say if their car was getting vandalized.

gweidenh

join:2002-05-18
Houston, TX
kudos:3
said by dsl2u:

Rules of what? Is there a rule that stipulates everybody has to have 911 access?

Yes, the FCC mandates that a VoIP provider that offers inbound and outbound service must also provide E911 service for a reasonable fee to the customer.


Gershom 1624

@optonline.net
said by gweidenh:

said by dsl2u:

Rules of what? Is there a rule that stipulates everybody has to have 911 access?

Yes, the FCC mandates that a VoIP provider that offers inbound and outbound service must also provide E911 service for a reasonable fee to the customer.

The OP is in Canada, but it is worth mentioning that the Canadian CRTC has similar rules though not identical.

CRTC tries to make a little more accommodation for nomadic VoIP as opposed to fixed VoIP, yet clearly in this situation the phone service would be considered "fixed" and "interconnected" by the officials in both countries.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to dsl2u
said by dsl2u:

A cell phone is far more effective for 911 than a land line.

While there are many real benefits to both VoIP and cell phones, 911 access is one area where POTS still rules for now (and the foreseeable future). Even VoIP and E911 in a home or office are better then mobile phones for 911 calls.

In most urban areas 911 call routing from mobile phones is highly unpredictable. Calls from freeway accidents get routed to local city departments while the emergency calls from homes near that same freeway get routed to a 911 center for the state highway patrol (often just a single location in the state capitol). Obviously the intend is the reverse, but far too often those critical 911 calls from mobile phones get delayed by initial routing errors and the need to forward those calls to the correct agency.

The only redeeming factor for cell phones in emergency situations is that almost everybody has one (no need to search for a phone when in an unfamiliar location). However if you want to ensure the quickest response to the correct location pick up a POTS phone instead (or a VoIP phone with E911).

The POTS phone will be wherever it is physically plugged in (not temporarily misplaced in the panic of an emergency) and will work regardless whether or not you remembered to charge your phone or whether or not your home has electric power (POTS phones are CO powered). Most importantly the 911 operator will know exactly from where you are calling even if you are in some way incapacitated from speaking.
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Trev
IP Telephony Addict
Premium
join:2009-06-29
Victoria, BC
kudos:6
reply to dsl2u
said by dsl2u:

said by Trev:

that is against the rules and will put the operator in hot water if something goes wrong.

Rules of what? Is there a rule that stipulates everybody has to have 911 access? What if people don't have a phone line at all? I'm in Canada but I presume the laws are similar here as the US.

Yes, CRTC and FCC both require that you provide 911 service when selling a service that's functionally equivalent to a land line, as this would be.

said by dsl2u:

Regarding registering as a phone company, I wonder what makes something a phone company? You could offer it as simply an internet package of some sort to separate yourself further from phone issues.

If it looks like a phone and functions like a phone, it's a phone even if you don't call it that.



In regards to the QoS, you have to be really careful with that. Throttling and blocking services are a hot topic with both sides fighting hard and the CRTC making decisions all the time. You have to comply with these rules as you would become an Internet Service Provider as well with such a venture.
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I represent AcroVoice, a full service Canadian VoIP Provider.
Buy your Obihai ATA shipped from within Canada.