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Last Parade

join:2002-10-07
Port Colborne, ON
reply to spock

Re: Status of ipv6 with Canadian ISP

Why you would actively want an IPv6 address is beyond me.


paul248

join:2001-09-04

1 recommendation

said by Last Parade:

Why you would actively want an IPv6 address is beyond me.

On the contrary, why would you want to actively restrict yourself from accessing the entire Internet? I just don't understand IPv6 luddism. It's like saying "my car still has gas in the tank, so I don't care if nobody is selling the Mr. Fusion here."

IPv6 moves us from a world where numbers are a scarce, expensive commodity, to a world of boundless plenty. How could you possibly be opposed to that, unless you have a vested interest in profiting from the scarcity?


spock

join:2012-07-08
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

1 recommendation

reply to Last Parade

said by Last Parade:

Why you would actively want an IPv6 address is beyond me.

ipv6 is coming. There is no doubt about that. ipv4 only provides 4.2 billion addresses, not enough for every single person on the planet. There are benefits of ipv6 over ipv4. I want ipv6 for training purposes. Unfortunately my ISP will only give me a single ip from the same /64 it gives everyone else. This means only one device in my network will have ipv6 connectivity. I want to see what my options were. I did not want to have a debate of ipv6 over ipv4. It is a waste of time. I'd suggest people embrace ipv6 and start learning how it works. The day of PAT will be over. I personally like to learn and figure out how things work. An advancement like ipv6 sounds like an interesting challenge.

One benefit I see will be for gamers. IPv6 will see faster ping times. Everytime a ipv4 packet passes through a router that router has to recalculate the frame check sequence. This eats up processor time and adds to the delay. IPv6 does not have fcs and relays on layer 2 and layer 4 error checking.

paul248

join:2001-09-04

2 edits

1 recommendation

said by spock:

Unfortunately my ISP will only give me a single ip from the same /64 it gives everyone else.

It sounds like they haven't put much effort into deploying IPv6 robustly (Edit: that's probably false; see below). Are you sure that you're actually limited to a single IP, or can you grab any number of addresses as long as you participate in Neighbor Discovery?

If it's the latter, then you might be able to hack something together using 6relayd:

»github.com/sbyx/6relayd

Edit: also, If you haven't already, try asking your ISP if they'd be willing to manually route a /56 to you. This thread suggests that they were beta testing with /56 routes in 2010:

»IPv6 beta


rogersmogers

@start.ca
reply to paul248

said by paul248:

said by Last Parade:

Why you would actively want an IPv6 address is beyond me.

On the contrary, why would you want to actively restrict yourself from accessing the entire Internet? I just don't understand IPv6 luddism. It's like saying "my car still has gas in the tank, so I don't care if nobody is selling the Mr. Fusion here."

IPv6 moves us from a world where numbers are a scarce, expensive commodity, to a world of boundless plenty. How could you possibly be opposed to that, unless you have a vested interest in profiting from the scarcity?

What part of the internet can you not access?

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

1 recommendation

reply to paul248

said by paul248:

It sounds like they haven't put much effort into deploying IPv6 robustly (Edit: that's probably false; see below). Are you sure that you're actually limited to a single IP, or can you grab any number of addresses as long as you participate in Neighbor Discovery?

TSI's v6 roll out even for beta testing has been pretty poor.


spock

join:2012-07-08

1 recommendation

reply to paul248

I live in the west so the ipv6 beta for teksavvy is quite a bit different than in Ontario. No /56

I will look into 6rd

Thanks


paul248

join:2001-09-04

1 recommendation

said by spock:

I will look into 6rd

I mentioned 6relayd. 6rd is "IPv6 rapid deployment", a tunneling technology which is almost but not entirely unrelated to this discussion.

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to spock

said by spock:

Unfortunately my ISP will only give me a single ip from the same /64 it gives everyone else. This means only one device in my network will have ipv6 connectivity.

If your ISP is really doing it this way then they are breaking the IPv6 standard which calls for a WHOLE /64 for each subscriber. The cheapest ARIN allocation for IPv6 is $2500/year for any size from /40 to /32 so it makes no sense for ISPs to order anything smaller than /32, which is enough to give a /64 to as many as 4 billion endpoints.

Your router is supposed to pick up its /64 subnet either through DHCP or route advertisement and then either assign addresses to LAN devices using DHCP or advertise the IPv6 route on the LAN and let devices self-configure the remaining 64 bits of the address field using SLAAC. Either way, the ISP should not be managing the 64 LSBs.

DSL_Ricer
Premium
join:2007-07-22
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to rogersmogers

said by rogersmogers :

What part of the internet can you not access?

Incoming connection to many mobile phones in Europe and Asia. Increasingly, regular internet subscribers too.
Certain forms of VPN also require unique source and destination IP address pairs. So two people/systems behind the same NAT can't connect to the same endpoint.
I'd assume that most NAT routers only support tcp, udp and icmp. So newer protocols would probably be unusable.

mactalla

join:2008-02-19
kudos:1

2 recommendations

reply to paul248

said by paul248:

Are you sure that you're actually limited to a single IP, or can you grab any number of addresses as long as you participate in Neighbor Discovery?

If it's the latter, then you might be able to hack something together using 6relayd:

»github.com/sbyx/6relayd

Thanks for mentioning this. I just tried it out (same ISP as the OP). Either I've misconfigured something or their config can't handle more than 1 IP per PPPoE connection.

Watching both the WAN and LAN interfaces I see the Router Advertisements get relayed. I don't actually see the Neighbour Solicitation/Advertisements relayed out to the WAN interface though I've asked 6relayd to relay it all and machines on the LAN are getting IPs in the correct prefix. It is updating the routing table to accommodate the IPs on the LAN and from the LAN I can ping either the LAN or WAN interfaces of the router. But when pinging out to the Net I see the echo requests go out but nothing entering the WAN port.

I expected to see the neighbour solicitation/advertisement relayed to the WAN. Not sure why I don't see that.