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trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
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1 edit

1 recommendation

How long will my (your) SSD last?

How long will my (your) SSD last?

Well, that's a question that a lot of us have on our minds when buying an SSD. There's really no concrete real-world numbers in terms of actual amounts of Terabytes written to the SSD.

Well... the guys over at one of the many hardware enthusiast web sites is putting this to the test, in this case... it's the guys over at TweakTown.

They are testing a Samsung 840 (non-Pro) Series 250 GB SSD from opening the package to SSD death.

Last update they posted indicates that they have written a total of 100 TBs to the drive and it's still chugging along. They will update the article with various milestone updates, the last milestone was 100 TB. They will continue to update the article until the SSD dies. They are using Anvil's Storage Utilities to perform the test.

Samsung 840 SSD Storage Endurance Testing - TLC to the End
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog | AOKP (The Android Open Kang Project)



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
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Earth Orbit
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Interesting--I just bought an 840 500GB (non-Pro), so I am curious how long it takes to kill it.



trparky
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Me too. I have the 250 GB version of it, the same one that they are testing in the article.



Octavean
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reply to Krisnatharok

Yea, I've got the Samsung 840 500GB non-Pro too. Installed Windows 8 Pro on it in January,....no HDD in the system,..



ImpldConsent
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·AT&T U-Verse
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reply to trparky

said by trparky:

Last update they posted indicates that they have written a total of 100 TBs to the drive and it's still chugging along. They will update the article with various milestone updates, the last milestone was 100 TB. They will continue to update the article until the SSD dies.

Well, already I feel GREAT. I will NEVER, EVER write near 100TB on my SSD. After 8340 power-on hours, I've read 4.4TB and written 896GB (I think ... koitsu ... is my ID 241/F1 and ID 242/F2 RAW DATA read as GB?).
--
That's "MISTER" Kafir to you.


trparky
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1 recommendation

According to CrystalDiskInfo, my SSD has been online for 693 hours and has written 556 GBs.



pnjunction
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Toronto, ON
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reply to trparky

I use my work laptop pretty heavily and I'm only up to 1.94 TB after about 14 months.

Intel's documentation for the Intel 320 says it is rated for 20GB per day for the full 5 year warranty. That's about 36TB.

That's probably conservative too, 25nm NAND is supposedly good for 3,000 write cycles. Assuming a write amplification of 1.1 that seems to be about 320TB for my 120GB drive. If it was the 480GB unit that number would be over a PB!

It's not even close to a concern yet unless you are moving crazy amounts of data. Someone who does heavy HD video editing might be able to comment on how long it would take them to write something like 100TB of data.



trparky
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Cleveland, OH
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2 edits

I did some fuzzy math here.

My SSD has been online for 694 hours.
694 hours / 24 hours = 28.9166 days

I have written so far 556 GBs to the drive in those 694 hours.

So for the sake of this math, I'm going to say that in the average month I'm going to write about 700 GBs per month.

100 TB = 102,400 GB

102400 GB / 700 GB per month = 146.2857142857143 months (or 146.29 months)

146.29 months / 12 months (1 year) = 12.19 years

So, if an SSD can sustain 100 TB according to the test so far, which we can't say is the limit since the SSD hasn't died yet under TweakTown's test, we can therefore say that an average Samsung 840 Series 250 GB SSD will last anywhere from 10 to 12 years with a sustained write of an average of 700 GBs per month.

Or, if you do an average of 800 GBs per month... that's going to be the following math.

102400 GB / 800 GB per month = 128 months = 10.66 years.

So that means... an average of 9 to 10 years of life.
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog | AOKP (The Android Open Kang Project)



Krisnatharok
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I've had my Vertex2 powered on for 13,328 hours (555 days) and done 18.69 TB of reads and 5.00 TB of writes.



DrModem
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reply to trparky

It doesn't need to last forever, just long enough.

How many people are still using a computer, much less a hard drive from 2001-2003?

Even my extreme technophobe grandmother (Who barley uses a computer at all) shed her 1999 HP win98 machine almost 6 years ago.



trparky
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What I'm trying to make with my post, and granted, I am probably preaching to the choir here, is that the fears that TLC and cheaper NAND flash in SSDs is really nothing to worry about.

Most SSDs, even the lowly Samsung 840 Series (non-Pro) is going to last the average consumer, even us geeks, longer than we will ever want to keep that SSD around. Chances are, that SSD will end up in the recycling pile in exchange for a higher capacity SSD long before it's dead.
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog | AOKP (The Android Open Kang Project)



trparky
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Note, this is based upon the life of the NAND flash memory itself. This observation does not take into account possible firmware issues that may cause premature SSD death. This is something that can't be predicted.
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog | AOKP (The Android Open Kang Project)



Mike
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join:2000-09-17
Pittsburgh, PA
kudos:1
reply to trparky

Corsair Force GT 240.
Firmware 5.02

Power On Hours - 5404
Power On Counts - 53
2.11 TB Read
917 Write.



fartness
computersoc dot com
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Look Outside
reply to trparky

Will it just die one day, or what will happen? Symptoms?



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
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The SSDs I wrecked accumulated bad sectors, so in a real life usage that could've meant some data loss, the exact amount depending on the number of bad sectors and on their location.

In those cases, once the SSDs reached a certain limit, they wouldn't boot any more, Win8 would enter into an infinite repair cycle, etc.
--
Wacky Races 2012!



ImpldConsent
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reply to Krisnatharok

said by Krisnatharok:

I've had my Vertex2 powered on for 13,328 hours (555 days) and done 18.69 TB of reads and 5.00 TB of writes.

Which gives me more hope on my Vertex2 and more anecdotal evidence against the OCZ nay-sayers.
--
That's "MISTER" Kafir to you.


rogersfail

@teksavvy.com
reply to pnjunction

I do some video archiving in my personal time and so far my Ocz vertex 4 has done 4.48 TB in the 93 days ive owned which comes out to around 48 GB/day. So it would take me around 5.7 years to get to the 100 TB mark.



sivran
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Irving, TX
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reply to DrModem

said by DrModem:

It doesn't need to last forever, just long enough.

How many people are still using a computer, much less a hard drive from 2001-2003?

Even my extreme technophobe grandmother (Who barley uses a computer at all) shed her 1999 HP win98 machine almost 6 years ago.

Pretty sure my current linux box was built around 2003 or so. Same hard drives in it as when it was built.
--
Think Outside the Fox.


koitsu
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reply to ImpldConsent

said by ImpldConsent:

said by trparky:

Last update they posted indicates that they have written a total of 100 TBs to the drive and it's still chugging along. They will update the article with various milestone updates, the last milestone was 100 TB. They will continue to update the article until the SSD dies.

Well, already I feel GREAT. I will NEVER, EVER write near 100TB on my SSD. After 8340 power-on hours, I've read 4.4TB and written 896GB (I think ... koitsu ... is my ID 241/F1 and ID 242/F2 RAW DATA read as GB?).

It depends on how the vendor chooses to implement storage of the SMART attribute data. For example, on some (not necessarily all) Intel SSDs, attributes 241 and 242 RAW_VALUE columns track the number of 32MBytes (more specifically 32MiBs) read/written. Use smartmontools, it has proper decoding for this. Proof:

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Model Family:     Intel 320 Series SSDs
Device Model:     INTEL SSDSA2CW080G3
...
241 Host_Writes_32MiB       0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       -       42034
242 Host_Reads_32MiB        0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       -       4560
 
So for the above SSD, 42034*32 = 1,345,088 MiBs have been written, and 4560*32 = 145,920 MiBs have been read.

Another example drive, different model, but still Intel:

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Model Family:     Intel 510 Series SSDs
Device Model:     INTEL SSDSC2MH120A2
...
225 Host_Writes_32MiB       0x0030   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      -       109412
 

(This model does not track reads)

109412*32 = 3,501,184 MiBs, which is correct (using Intel's SSD Toolbox, the humanised value shown is "3.34TB").

But as I said, it varies per model of drive and manufacturer of drive (both things).
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


fartness
computersoc dot com
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Look Outside
reply to trparky

If it's used in a server, it sounds like the life will be dramatically reduced, is that correct?



trparky
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Yes, there's that possibly but again it all depends upon how many writes you are making to the SSD.

The point of my post is that a lot of enthusiast web sites seem to be so focused on the lifespan of the SSD. They all seem hyper about it to the point that even the mere thought of having even the slightest reduction in SSD lifespan (even theorized reduction) can make these people not want to buy a particular SSD. The thing I'm trying to drive home is that for the average home user with their average computer with average use (and that even includes us geeks here on this site), an SSD will outlive the usefulness of the SSD in the sense that we'll be looking to buy a new one for increased capacity long before the drive dies from too many writes.

So go ahead, buy the SSD. Don't worry about that number. All of the enthusiast web sites seem too focused on that number.
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog | AOKP (The Android Open Kang Project)



Jan Janowski

join:2000-06-18
Skokie, IL
reply to trparky

I'm using a 128Gb Non-Pro Samsung as Cache and Cache Database drive for video editing... It has really made a difference..
and I'll be watching this thread, too...

--
Looking for 1939 Indian Motocycle



trparky
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join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
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I use the SSD as the primary boot drive. I have two of them, one in my desktop and one in my notebook.

Getting an SSD, especially one of the cheaper drives such as the Samsung 840 Series (non-Pro) really is one of the best (and cheap) ways to upgrade an older computer and make it feel like new again.
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog | AOKP (The Android Open Kang Project)


Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:4
reply to trparky

said by trparky:

Yes, there's that possibly but again it all depends upon how many writes you are making to the SSD.

The point of my post is that a lot of enthusiast web sites seem to be so focused on the lifespan of the SSD. They all seem hyper about it to the point that even the mere thought of having even the slightest reduction in SSD lifespan (even theorized reduction) can make these people not want to buy a particular SSD. The thing I'm trying to drive home is that for the average home user with their average computer with average use (and that even includes us geeks here on this site), an SSD will outlive the usefulness of the SSD in the sense that we'll be looking to buy a new one for increased capacity long before the drive dies from too many writes.

So go ahead, buy the SSD. Don't worry about that number. All of the enthusiast web sites seem too focused on that number.

Hmmm....can't see why I'd be looking, during the lifetime of this computer, to buy a new larger one when I have a Samsung PM830 mSATA 256GB drive. I don't know if SSD Life is any good at determining the life of this drive but it claims 8 years, 5 months.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


Vchat20
Landing is the REAL challenge
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join:2003-09-16
Columbus, OH
reply to trparky


SSDLife
60GB OCZ Solid 3 in my notebook here. According to SSDLife I have just hit the 9TB write mark and it is still at 100% health. Installed it as the main boot/OS drive October '11 and it is estimating TEC of March 09, 2021. As stated, even with the real cheap consumer grade drives like these under normal everyday usage (I even left the hibernate and page files alone so they lie on the SSD. 2GB RAM on a Win8 machine) the drives will die long after their usefulness.
--
I swear, some people should have pace-makers installed to free up the resources. Breathing and heart beat taxes their whole system, all of their brain cells wasted on life support.-two bit brains, and the second bit is wasted on parity! ~head_spaz

praetoralpha

join:2005-08-06
Pittsburgh, PA
Reviews:
·Earthlink Cable ..
reply to trparky

I got a Vertex 4 512 gb over the summer. I reinstalled Windows 7, and I hacked the install procedure so that my "C:\Users" directory pointed to my existing hard drive; everything else on SSD. I figure that that directory is responsible for most data writes and doesn't need to have super fast times, so my SSD should last longer.

»answers.microsoft.com/en-us/wind···aebb296e



Ghastlyone
Premium
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reply to trparky

My Vertex 4...


Pyrion
Liquid Metal Nanomorph

join:2001-12-01
Poway, CA
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reply to trparky

Corsair Force 3 120GB, 2377 hours, 785GB read, 434GB written, no retired blocks.


markf

join:2008-01-24
Burlington, ON
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reply to trparky

Not sure what the huge fuss about SSD life is all about...

I have one in each of my computers as a boot drive (the one in my laptop is my everything drive). I recently built a PC for a friend and here's the way I look at it:

For a consumer grade drive (for a desktop), 120GB - 128GB is sufficient as a boot drive. That'll set you back about $100 (Samsung, can't remember the model). The difference between the i3 and i5 CPUs we were looking at was about $100.

So if you're looking to spend that $100, is an SSD more beneficial than an i5 for an average consumer machine?

That $100 will disappear quickly in the CPU as more powerful CPUs come out, so who cares if the SSD lasts only 5 or so years, isn't the speed increase worth it?

My friend is amazed by the difference the SSD made in his machine. Pretty much instant on (in Windows 8) with very good performance. That machine will get a mid cycle CPU upgrade ($50 on eBay in a couple of years) before the SSD needs any attention.

I know that my 2.5 year old i3 370M SSD performs better than my wife's 4 month old i5 HDD(cant' remember which CPU, 3rd gen though) laptop. For the base level SSD's, there is value. I would be more concerned about spending $400 on a 512GB drive, but at the 256GB and less ($200 or less) level, a few good years is all I ask.


MaynardKrebs
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reply to aurgathor

said by aurgathor:

The SSDs I wrecked accumulated bad sectors, so in a real life usage that could've meant some data loss, the exact amount depending on the number of bad sectors and on their location.

In those cases, once the SSDs reached a certain limit, they wouldn't boot any more, Win8 would enter into an infinite repair cycle, etc.

So the big question in that case is - will freezing the SSD drive allow you to recover data which has not been backed up?

Freezing a failing/failed mechanical drive for 24 hours often is enough to get get it working to the point where you can extract data for 15-20 minutes until it really warms up again.