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mpovit

join:2005-04-19
Dundee, IL

[Connectivity] Do I Need a 10/100/1000 Switch

Hello Everyone:
Forgive me if I am double posting. I don't think my first post went through. I am having the Extreme 105 package installed. In my home network I use a Netgear JFS524, 24 port 10/100 Switch. Since the service I will be getting is 105 MBS. do I need to replace the switch with a 10/100/1000 switch? Do all of the computers on my network have to have 10/100/1000 Network Interface Cards?

Thanks,

Marc


ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA

I would recommend it highly. And yes, the clients (Computers) must also have 10/100/1000 Network Cards.
--
»www.VAJeeps.com | »www.APetForum.com



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to mpovit

none of them HAVE to have it, but you won't get any faster than the slowest interface between 2 of them. Also some listed as 100/T (100Mbps) aren't able to sustain that speed at full duplex rates for more than a brief transmission.
If you only wish to replace as little as possible, I would wait until it is installed and do some extended testing between devices on the LAN to see which would truly benefit.
If you actually get the full 105 Mbps from comcast or even higher PB speeds and it is ALWAYS 2 or more devices downloading, no single device should need a faster speed down than 100T.
However because everything passes through the switch and you may have interLAN traffic as well as internet traffic replacing the switch with a 100/1000 router is a likely possibility as well as any non GiBit NIC's. ON some older machines, consoles and laptops this is not practical sometime not even possible but those devices will continue to work at their highest possible speed.



Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO
reply to mpovit

said by mpovit:

Hello Everyone:
Forgive me if I am double posting. I don't think my first post went through. I am having the Extreme 105 package installed. In my home network I use a Netgear JFS524, 24 port 10/100 Switch. Since the service I will be getting is 105 MBS. do I need to replace the switch with a 10/100/1000 switch? Do all of the computers on my network have to have 10/100/1000 Network Interface Cards?

Thanks,

Marc

Are you talking about a switch or router?

Generally you need to connect your modem's ethernet output to the WAN input of a router. You should use a router with a Gigabit WAN input port. Most such routers will have in addition four Gigabit ethernet ports to connect computers, printers or a switch for additional connections. The experience of folks in these forums is that if you have, say, a 100 Mb per sec WAN input on a router you will not get 100 Mb per sec throughput. Also, if you have multiple devices (other computers, Rokus, etc.) operating simultaneously you'll need the higher speed connections. Likewise, you'll need Gigabit ethernet ports in your computers. Newer computers will have them. If your computers are connected via WiFi, older WiFi routers may not have the ability to meet a 100 Mb per sec throughput particularly if multiple devices are connected for simultaneous use. If you need more than the four ethernet ports of the typical router you'll need a Gigabit switch. In an earlier post there was a recommendation for a four-port switch from Newegg that cost something like $20. Do a search of dslreports for the posting.
--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891

mpovit

join:2005-04-19
Dundee, IL

I am talking about a switch.



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to mpovit

The JGS524 appears to be the current replacement for your JFS524
»www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···Parent=1, you may want to step up a notch or 2 if you fully utilize 24 ports
but you do need some sort of router in the path for NAT even if you have a smart switch handling all the LAN traffic.


mpovit

join:2005-04-19
Dundee, IL

I am mixed up now. On my existing setup all I did was connect one of the 4 ports on the back of my modem to one of the ports on my jfs524. If I get the jgs524 could I do the same? Does the modem that Comcast uses have 4 ports? Are the modems with the four ports considered routers? What should I use besides the jgs524. Please forgive me if I am asking dumb questions, I have only setup simple networks like I have now.

Thanks,

Marc



Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10

tshirt See Profile is stating that if you want "NAT", you would need a router between the modem & switch. You don't need it if you are not concerned.

ref: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_ad···nslation



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to mpovit

said by mpovit:

Are the modems with the four ports considered routers?

Those are called, "Residential Gateways"; and, yes, they comprise a router and modem combined in one box. Fairly common with DSL service; not so much with cable service.

I have worked with two models. I don't recall which one CenturyLink issued for my mother, other than it was VDSL. My ISP issued an ADSL2+ RG. I found it rather limiting, compared with my old D-Link DIR-655. So I brought the old ADSL2+ modem from another residence, and combined it with an ASUS RT-AC66U.

IMO, a separate modem and router is preferable to an RG. ISPs will always "cheap out" on the CPE.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to mpovit

Yes, upgrading to the jgs524 will work the same if the modem you have is a "gateway" i.e. has the router function built -in, which is what you are describing.
A couple other considerations are that depending on how you use it the gateway may not have adequate routing 'power'/controls to really route well on your LAN if you have many fast/high powered devices attached (gateways/all-in-ones, being sort of a compromise of modem and router blended together) you'll have to see if it causes any slow downs.

The other is ComCast is rapidly deploying IPv6, and if I was going to spend a couple $100 on a new switch I'd want it to be able to handle IPv6 pass through functions.
The truth is unless you are already running multiple high power machines on your LAN your current switch may be fine.
I just don't want to see you over spend so can you describe how many ports, and what kind of devices/services you are currently running through the switch.
There are no dumb questions, if you aren't sure, it's worth asking.
BTW Is this a business? home on a business account? Using static IP's from comcast?


mpovit

join:2005-04-19
Dundee, IL

I want to thank you all for your help. My network is simple. I currently have the 24 port jfs524 being fed from my Uverse modem. (Pace 3801 HGV) I have wired outlets throughout my house for 16 of the twenty four ports through a patch panel. I am currently using them as follows. I have two active wired computers on the network. In addition one line from the switch is going to my family room where I have a Direct TV DVR
that utilizes my network for the Whole Home DVR setup. I also have my Samsung flat screen connected to the network in the family room. In the family room I used a small 5 port switch so I did not have to run an individual line to the DVR and the TV. I have one wireless computer. I know the next question you are asking, why do you need a 105 mbs connection. I don't have a good answer for you. I think I will be getting a gateway from Comcast because wireless is included. Even if it was not a gateway and had a single port could I just plug it into the jgs524?



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by mpovit:

I think I will be getting a gateway from Comcast because wireless is included. Even if it was not a gateway and had a single port could I just plug it into the jgs524?

Nope, if you want 105 it's fine by me.
Plugging in directly wouldn't work unless you went on a business account and paid extra for "static IP's for each device.
Having/controlling the router in your home adds another security layer so I recommend it.
Of all the compromises gateways have, the wireless portion is among the worst.
Often the best placement for the modem, is a poor position for the wireless AP function and many Gateways already have weak radios and few available controls to make the best of use of what power the have.

From your description your house is fairly large and for your use your current switch is should be fine. I would rather see you spend the money on a good router and your own modem (and maybe a second AP depending on the wireless usage)


Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO

1 edit

I agree w/ tshirt and others in this thread.

If you plan on keeping Comcast as your ISP for a year, you're better off buying your own modem. Current b, g, n modems (Motorola, Zoom) run around $80. At $7/month rental from Comcast you'll be saving money in about a year. Folks in these forums seem to be unanimous in suggesting a separate modem-router configuration. Besides being more flexible (easy firmware updates, easy/flexible configuration options, etc.) if something goes wrong it's easy to diagnose whether it's the modem or router that went bad and replace the one appliance. You can also future proof yourself today by getting an 802.11ac WiFi router. I've seen the Netgear ac router for $125.

The OP didn't say if he's getting telephone service from Comcast. If so your options are limited. Others in the thread can comment on those limitations.
--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891


mpovit

join:2005-04-19
Dundee, IL

I just got Internet only. I am planning on getting my own modem. According to Comcast they will be installing an Aeris 862 TMG Gateway that has 4 gigabit ports on it.