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nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting

1 recommendation

reply to Clever_Proxy

Re: Turning off Power to a Building

Don't be scared. The disconnects are there to be used. Just shut off all of the mains. Usually, these are spring loaded and fast acting - you probably have to put a little ass behind them.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

Just to duck out on a bit of a tangent - are you guys not jumping on the Arc-Flash bandwagon down there?

I now have to have exclusion zone's marked on the floor, and need to wear a suit to operate anything 600v or higher; or 100A or larger.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

1 recommendation

said by LazMan:

Just to duck out on a bit of a tangent - are you guys not jumping on the Arc-Flash bandwagon down there?

I now have to have exclusion zone's marked on the floor, and need to wear a suit to operate anything 600v or higher; or 100A or larger.

More Big Brother. I worked in industry for 35 years before retiring and the thousands of MCC starter buckets, 2300 v starters, 4160 v starters and 15 kv switchgear and transformers never once did we ever have an "arc-flash" and we worked a lot of the 480 volt gear hot. The key is to have qualified trained Electricians to do the work.

The damn suits are a sick joke mandated by a government agency whose inept employees are clueless but have unaccountable power.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

No disagreement - I think it's overkill, as well...

I used to change breakers in live panels all the time (production environment, killing power was a pain in the ass) - now, that's a big no-no...

I have been involved in two arc-flash incidents (a minor one first hand; when a 2000A disconnect was operated under load, and failed, one part of the aftermath, when a 3000A breaker cell blew while racking in the breaker) - so I know the hazards. There's a time and place to wear the suit, but I think they've gone crazy with how restrictive it's become up here...

Anyways - so, I assume it's become an issue for you guys down there, too, then...



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by LazMan:

No disagreement - I think it's overkill, as well...

I used to change breakers in live panels all the time (production environment, killing power was a pain in the ass) - now, that's a big no-no...

I have been involved in two arc-flash incidents (a minor one first hand; when a 2000A disconnect was operated under load, and failed, one part of the aftermath, when a 3000A breaker cell blew while racking in the breaker) - so I know the hazards. There's a time and place to wear the suit, but I think they've gone crazy with how restrictive it's become up here...

Anyways - so, I assume it's become an issue for you guys down there, too, then...

Yes it had just started when I retired in 1998. My replacement had to deal with it and from what I heard the suits and requirements were a royal PITA and effected employee effectiveness and productivity. Not to mention the additional cost of the "suits"


nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
reply to LazMan

I think you replied to the wrong person. I didn't say anything about arc flash.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

I know you didn't bring it up - I was asking if it's becoming an issue for you guys; the same way it's become a pain in the ass up here.


nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by LazMan:

Just to duck out on a bit of a tangent - are you guys not jumping on the Arc-Flash bandwagon down there?

I now have to have exclusion zone's marked on the floor, and need to wear a suit to operate anything 600v or higher; or 100A or larger.

More Big Brother. I worked in industry for 35 years before retiring and the thousands of MCC starter buckets, 2300 v starters, 4160 v starters and 15 kv switchgear and transformers never once did we ever have an "arc-flash" and we worked a lot of the 480 volt gear hot. The key is to have qualified trained Electricians to do the work.

The damn suits are a sick joke mandated by a government agency whose inept employees are clueless but have unaccountable power.

maybe no arc flash suits but probably say cotton work clothes not nylon or polyesters leisure suit to melt into skin even with a small error.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by nonymous:

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by LazMan:

Just to duck out on a bit of a tangent - are you guys not jumping on the Arc-Flash bandwagon down there?

I now have to have exclusion zone's marked on the floor, and need to wear a suit to operate anything 600v or higher; or 100A or larger.

More Big Brother. I worked in industry for 35 years before retiring and the thousands of MCC starter buckets, 2300 v starters, 4160 v starters and 15 kv switchgear and transformers never once did we ever have an "arc-flash" and we worked a lot of the 480 volt gear hot. The key is to have qualified trained Electricians to do the work.

The damn suits are a sick joke mandated by a government agency whose inept employees are clueless but have unaccountable power.

maybe no arc flash suits but probably say cotton work clothes not nylon or polyesters leisure suit to melt into skin even with a small error.

We required cotton work uniforms and safety glasses


Red_Menace
poking around since 1978

join:2001-11-03
Littleton, CO
reply to LazMan

Yep, definitely a pain in the ass. I mainly do controls, and the last couple of employers had a "no hot work" policy - of course, you needed to use hot gloves, shields, suits if needed, etc, just to check if you couldn't work on something.

I've also worked in a few production environments, but haven't come across any that would allow panels to be shut off (ever), even though their own safety policy doesn't allow hot work. Nice.

Can't wait to retire - it's no fun anymore.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by Red_Menace:

I've also worked in a few production environments, but haven't come across any that would allow panels to be shut off (ever), even though their own safety policy doesn't allow hot work. Nice.

Very familiar with that. When you consider what it costs a manufacturer to shut down a process it's very understandable to require the work to be done hot.