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More Detail on New ISP, RIAA/MPAA Agreement
Deal Not Final, to Focus Heavily on 'Education'
by Karl Bode 10:19AM Friday Jun 24 2011
Yesterday a report emerged claiming that ISPs and ISP organizations (including AT&T, Verizon, Comcast at the NCTA) are negotiating with the RIAA and MPAA on a new plan taking aim at P2P users. As we noted yesterday, most ISP "graduated response" programs so far have largely been bluffs intended simply to frighten, but major ISPs are now considering harsher actions against copyright infringers, including filtering website access or throttling connections. Mathew Lasar over at Ars Technica has confirmed the talks with a second industry source, though this source insists the deal certainly isn't final, and focuses more on "education" than enforcement:
quote:
Click for full size
The contact took issue with the article's emphasis on the type of subscriber punishments being considered. "There is no agreement in place; nothing has been signed," we were told, and "the focus on enforcement is inaccurate." Instead, the final deal will emphasize "mitigation and education" far more than disciplinary action, our source explained. These measures will include "a very long process of notification, click throughs, and education." They will be foregrounded "long before there is any thought anything close to the kind of things reported today."
The report also notes that each agreement will be different for each ISP, which means that ISPs that have already eagerly embraced such programs (Qwest, Cox, Verizon) may take harsher action than those who have had reservations about such systems. Indeed, Lasar points out that AT&T has traditionally been worried about this kind of enforcement due to liability for screwing up:
quote:
"Private entities are not created or meant to conduct the law enforcement and judicial balancing act that would be required;" AT&T told the White House's IP enforcement coordinator a year ago. "They are not charged with sitting in judgment of facts; and they are not empowered to punish alleged criminals without a court order or other government sanction. Indeed, the liability implications of ISPs acting as a quasi-law-enforcement/judicial branch could be enormous."
Take AT&T's protestations with a grain of salt. AT&T is a company that didn't seem to think much of breaking Communications laws on numerous occasions (pdf) with government approval, and the Obama Administration is supposedly supportive of this new program. Qwest has already found itself sued for disconnecting a grandmather who they accused of piracy, only to find that she left her hotspot unsecured. However, while the deal may focus on "education" initially, Uncle Sam's blessing may ease ISP worries about taking steps toward more serious penalties like filters, something AT&T showed significant interest in years ago.

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No to ESPN

@sbcglobal.net

Organized Crime Moves into Control of ISPs

That should be the headline tomorrow on the front page of the newspaper.

That is my opinion and your mileage may vary.
gorehound

join:2009-06-19
Portland, ME

Re: Organized Crime Moves into Control of ISPs

my opinion as well.big content can suck my dog's ass.
support INDIE and boycot all MAFIAA

wdoa

join:2001-10-16
Spencer, MA

footage from MAFIAA education camps...

I wonder if they are "safe"...

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=dG5Qk-jB0D4

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

2 edits

Re: footage from MAFIAA education camps...

said by wdoa:

I wonder if they are "safe"...
(youtube clip)

Much more likely something like this:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxr-qwTyMto#t=1m50s


Infringers at anti-infringement boot camp



--
Record your speedtest.net results in DSLReports SpeedWave
»www.speedtest.net/wave/afe201cb84d45c88

Onedollar

join:2001-08-27
Pomona, CA
kudos:6

Already started

For Verizon users, if you login to your account on verizon.com. Under internet you will notice a link that will show you your copyright notices if you have received any.
Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
·CenturyLink

Time for that new program: People Are Dummies!

I wonder how the copyright police will educate the kiddies on the difference recording music off their favorite radio station and then transferring it to their mp3 player and down loading the music via P2P. I guess people are to lazy to record the music in real time like I did when I wanted to record a song from a Vinyl Record to a Cassette.

Along with screwing the non technical who have their broadband service throttled because an adolescent guest downloaded a few copyrighted songs, I have not seen a proposed means for the subscriber to have their service restored to unrestricted. There is no process proposed to allow the falsely accused to restore their good name.

Frank
Premium
join:2000-11-03
somewhere

Re: Time for that new program: People Are Dummies!

said by Mr Matt:

I wonder how the copyright police will educate the kiddies on the difference recording music off their favorite radio station and then transferring it to their mp3 player and

Dont give the music industry any ideas about people recording stuff off the radio, I wouldnt put it past them to require that all radio stations insert annoying sounds into the music like they do in jamaica.

In case you're not aware, in Jamaica whenever they play practically any song they mix in a couple of loud horn blasts so that people cant record the song onto cassette without it being known that it was taped off the radio.
--
At first I thought everyone on the highway was drunk but then I realized I was driving in Florida

BodyBumper

join:2004-06-21
Beverly Hills, CA

Good.

Users are starting to move away from P2P anyway. There are so many hosts where you can directly download your ill-gotten gains ...or linux distros at high speeds without having to share it.

Sites like rlslog is the next piratebay and bittorrent is becoming another edonkey.
--
"Time does not actually exist beyond an artificial measure we create in our minds to separate events we experience into blocks that are easier to reference instead of as a whole single event that just happens and continues happening" - evolvedant
Ricanlegend

join:2011-05-18
Bronx, NY

Boring

Its all about cops and robbers if i you to steal something you always find a way, All this bluff is nothing all you going to catch are the dummies everybody with half a brain will use proxy or a VPN

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: Boring

said by Ricanlegend:

Its all about cops and robbers if i you to steal something you always find a way, All this bluff is nothing all you going to catch are the dummies everybody with half a brain will use proxy or a VPN

The mantra of every criminal that thought they were smarter than the police. They commit 10 crimes and get away with 9, but the one time they get caught they pay a BIG price. That is what happens to law breakers.
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Record your speedtest.net results in DSLReports SpeedWave
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Wilsdom

join:2009-08-06

Re: Good.

But now that ISPs are doing the enforcement P2P detection is unnecessary. If they see you downloading gigabytes from anywhere (minus a few exceptions like Netflix that pay them kickbacks) they can spank you.
Rekrul

join:2007-04-21
Milford, CT

Re: Good.

said by Wilsdom:

But now that ISPs are doing the enforcement P2P detection is unnecessary. If they see you downloading gigabytes from anywhere (minus a few exceptions like Netflix that pay them kickbacks) they can spank you.

If they agree to send a tall, leather-clad dominatrix around to do the spanking, they've got a deal.

BodyBumper

join:2004-06-21
Beverly Hills, CA
said by Wilsdom:

If they see you downloading gigabytes from anywhere (minus a few exceptions like Netflix that pay them kickbacks) they can spank you.

This scenario is unlikely unless they plan force an À la carte/TV style internet where you're only allowed to access certain sites (ie Netflix for movies, CNN for news, etc) or if they monitor/screen everything their users download which will result in a bunch of lawsuits.

The only way they can realistically (and legally) prevent users from downloading large files without violating their privacy is by instituting smaller caps (ie 5GB for $50, 10GB for $75 and so on).
--
"Time does not actually exist beyond an artificial measure we create in our minds to separate events we experience into blocks that are easier to reference instead of as a whole single event that just happens and continues happening" - evolvedant
the cerberus

join:2007-10-16
Richmond Hill, ON

Re: Good.

LMAO.
How would you buy legal goods with those tiny caps?
Thats Lose-Lose, if you cant buy anything legal thats large either.

How would iTunes sell a seasons pass or Steam sell a single game?
Caps ONLY hurt the digital economy.

cork1958
Cork
Premium
join:2000-02-26
said by BodyBumper:

Users are starting to move away from P2P anyway. There are so many hosts where you can directly download your ill-gotten gains ...or linux distros at high speeds without having to share it.

Sites like rlslog is the next piratebay and bittorrent is becoming another edonkey.

Starting to move away?!

Only a total dipstick would use P2P now a days. I haven't used a P2P since Napster and have NEVER used those crap bittorrent things. Don't do newsgroups anymore either. It's all strictly http sites. Easy as pie.

Both these groups need to catch up to the current century!
--
The Firefox alternative.
»www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonkey/

anon6

@comcast.net

still can

they can still disconnect you and then what are you supposed to do?

wonthappen

@telus.net

extortion is a crime

As the AT&T quote loosely says,

quote:
"Private entities are not created or meant to conduct the law enforcement and judicial balancing act that would be required;" AT&T told the White House's IP enforcement coordinator a year ago. "They are not charged with sitting in judgment of facts; and they are not empowered to punish alleged criminals without a court order or other government sanction. Indeed, the liability implications of ISPs acting as a quasi-law-enforcement/judicial branch could be enormous."
,But as long as the stupid user is too chicken to file a basic small claims court lawsuit or file police charges against their ISP for censorship(constitutional violation) and illegal monitoring(DPI is actually a privacy invading crime), the copyright mafia is going to continue to commit extortion against users. Why are people(even the lawyers) so scared to make a point of that to the Judge?

If the ISP's try to claim "citizens arrest" for noticing a supposed crime(which they wouldn't of seen without already monitoring all your net traffic illegally, before an actual complaint from the copyright mafia), it will still be illegal to punish the user without charges and a federal or State court or provincial to do the punishment. the copyright mafia does not want to go to court and the times that they do, they make sure to get a Judge who is not properly educated about the Internet and digital type stuff. So you can call for a new Judge and specify that he actually knows about the digital world and never was an associate of the copyright mafia. A charge of Incompetence is so much fun to use against those that are in power.

If you get busted(an actual court ticket and arrest for a designated crime) and the police show up at your home to impound your computers for forensics? Make sure that "only" the police enter your home and "only" the police do the forensics, otherwise the police can be charged with 'conspiracy' if they "only" let the copyright mafia do the forensics(as the private company could plant evidence on the computers hard-drives). Conspiracy is based on having actual court admissible evidence for court and the police are not just being puppets, who are told to attack people in the name of extortion.

American Civil Liberties Union.
»www.aclu.org/

British Columbia civil Liberties Association.
»bccla.org/

Canada Privacy Commissioner and their review of illegal monitoring of users Internet communications.
»www.priv.gc.ca/information/pub/s···18_e.cfm
the Police forces of Canada want all ISP's to keep a 2 year file on all users Internet communications(all data including VOIP). Which is also illegal to collect data on innocent users who show no sign of crimes.
MrHappy316
Wish I had my tank
Premium
join:2003-01-02
Monterey, CA

Education?

I already get enough "education" when I have to waste 4 minutes of my life watching those stupid FBI INTERPOL warnings that you cannot fast forward thru. Had I just pirated the movie i could go straight to the movie without having to watch the same warning that's been around since the 80's.
Ricanlegend

join:2011-05-18
Bronx, NY

Re: Education?

Has that warning ever stop anybody from illegally copy and trading it ?

45612019

join:2004-02-05
New York, NY

Re: Education?

said by Ricanlegend:

Has that warning ever stop anybody from illegally copy and trading it ?

I still think it's hilarious that a decade later that stupid warning continues to be plastered on every single video release. Because we've all had plenty of time now to see just how effective it is...

HB
Maru Maru Mori Mori
Premium
join:2011-06-21
00000

Re: Education?

Like the Surgeon General warning on a pack of cigs...is there an idiot who doesn't know they cause cancer?

45612019

join:2004-02-05
New York, NY

Re: Education?

said by HB:

Like the Surgeon General warning on a pack of cigs...is there an idiot who doesn't know they cause cancer?

Most of the Chinese population.

HB
Maru Maru Mori Mori
Premium
join:2011-06-21
00000

Re: Education?

Don't know, or don't care? Big difference.
kevin_pink

join:2006-10-15
Bronx, NY
nah
MrHappy316
Wish I had my tank
Premium
join:2003-01-02
Monterey, CA
Not sure but when a good quality product gets put out I have no problems paying for it