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AT&T Aims a New $40 HBO, Broadband Bundle at Cord Cutters
by Karl Bode 12:46PM Monday Apr 07 2014
Last fall Comcast began tinkering with a new bundle that offered HBO, basic cable, and 25 Mbps broadband. While Comcast offers the bundle initially under promotion for $40-$50 a month (depending on your market), though it doesn't include HD content and the price jumps to a less sexy $70=$80 a month after one year. Not to be outdone, AT&T appears to be aiming a similar HBO broadband bundle promotion at their own customers -- with similar caveats.

DSLReports.com user Darknessfall See Profile points out in our forums that AT&T's new HBO bundle promotion provides U-basic TV with HBO and an 18 Mbps AT&T U-Verse connection for $40:
quote:
$39.99 Bundle Offer with HBO Included: For new residential U-verse customers. Price for U-basic TV with HBO and Internet Max Plus (18MBps). Available online only at att.com. 12-month term required. An early termination fee of up to $180 may apply if U-verse TV service is disconnected before end of term. Must maintain qualifying services for continued receipt of credits. After 12 months standard rates apply for all services unless cancelled by customer. Installation fee of $99 applies. Offer ends July 5, 2014.
Like Comcast's offer, that doesn't include the cost of HD content, which will cost you another $10 a month, or a DVR, which will run you another $15 per month. There's also a $99 activation fee and a $50 installation fee, and after 12 months the entire bundle price jumps significantly to around $80 a month. While both offers are slight variations from the norm, AT&T and Comcast seem primarily interested in getting their foot in the door with cord cutters (or younger folks who never had a cord) in order to upsell them on more expensive services.


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Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO

2 recommendations

reply to Mr Guy

Re: And they're still mising the point.

Yes, they will take less if that is what the consumer decides that is what it is worth. Unlike yourself who just wants to speculate and cry the content sky is falling, I am willing to say lets do it and see.

See you, much like the content executives, refuse to look outside the box. YOU keep spouting off that if the current model changes the entire industry will collapse and/or we all will be paying 2 to 3 times more for out content and that they just wont be able to come up with another way to make up revenues. All of which is pure speculation on your part and if you can make up random numbers, then so can the rest of us so I therefore declare we all will save 50% or more on our bill. You can't backup your claim and I can't back up my claim so lets agree we wont know until we try.

I say the current model needs to adjust and that the content providers will find a way to monetize their content. However, that monetization will be more in line with a true market value as the market will get to decide what any and every channel/show is worth. It will not be randomly determined by some suit's desire to earn X on it. I also think the quality of the content will increase as more shows compete to get in front of people.


Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO

2 recommendations

reply to Mr Guy

Blah blah blah.... Let's try it and find out since you have nothing but speculation to base this on and no matter how many times you spew this from you mouth it becomes no less true.

I am willing to make the bet it will be cheaper for a vast majority of people. It may not be initially, but as the market begins to set the true value of the channels it will probably lower 90+% of all television bills.



CrazyFingers

join:2003-10-01
Columbia, MO

2 recommendations

It's 2014. Your obsolete business model cannot be resurrected. The world has moved on. Consumers no longer want to pay ongoing subscriptions to cable services to get 19 shows they don't want for the one or two they do. People want the specific content they like, available on their own schedule. NetFlix and iTunes have demonstrated this amply, and shown it can work as a commercial product. Bittorrent has shown that your product isn't worth what you think it is, or at least that consumers will no longer subsidize a programming roster (or album) of garbage for the occasional gem.

Like it or not, NetFlix and bittorrent have shown consumers another way to get content. A less expensive and more convenient way. You need to drop the moral/ethical blustering and accept the cold business facts that are eating your revenue streams.
It's time to change.
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