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Akamai: U.S. 16th In Broadband Speed
Average U.S. connection speed is 4.7 Mbps
by Karl Bode 01:30PM Tuesday Jul 27 2010
Akamai just released their latest "State of the Internet Report," (registration required) which every quarter covers a number of topics including broadband penetration, broadband speeds, security, and more. It's of particular interest to our readers, as the company gathers the data from clients that have hit their 56,000-strong global content server network, tracking 487 million unique IP addresses from 234 countries.

Click for full size
According Akamai's latest data, the United States continues its role as a mediocre player in the broadband space, ranking sixteenth overall in average broadband speeds. The United States fares better in terms of average maximum broadband speeds, coming in eighth place at 16 Mbps. Says Akamai of this new measurement:
quote:
This metric represents an average of the maximum measured connection speeds across all of the unique IP addresses seen by Akamai from a particular geography. The average is used in order to mitigate the impact of unrepresentative maximum measured connection speeds. In contrast to the average measured connection speed, the average maximum connection speed metric is more representative of what many end-user Internet connections are capable of.
Akamai's top 100 list of the fastest city contains twelve cities in the United States, seven of which are in California. The fastest broadband city in the U.S. is Monterey Park, California. 61 of the top 100 fastest cities are in Japan. Masan, South Korea was declared the fastest city with an average speed of 40.56 Mbps.

The study notes that the average speed of a broadband connection in the United States is 4.7 Mbps, an average speed exceeded in 22 States. Delaware continues to be the State with the fastest average connection at 7.6 Mbps, while Alaska continues to be the slowest at 2.7 Mbps. Akamai notes that while 9 of the top 10 states with the highest levels of high broadband adoption are on the East Coast, only three East Coast states rank in the top 10 in terms of highest percentages of connections to Akamai at speeds over 25 Mbps.

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decifal

join:2007-03-10
Bon Aqua, TN
kudos:1

considering

Considering that the results are mostly false being non real broadband options were counted, the number is sadly lower and we should actually rank further down... :-/

DerfNerd

@alter.net

1 recommendation

Re: considering

If non-broadband connections were counted (assuming you mean dial up? Slow DSL?), wouldn't that actually place the rankings higher? Feel free to use some sort of actual "fact" in your post...

kapp0

join:2001-12-16
Belvidere, IL

Re: considering

This is for broadband speeds only, so non broadband speeds are irrelevant.
--
Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it all.
decifal

join:2007-03-10
Bon Aqua, TN
kudos:1
Satellite access counts as broadband.. It is virtually everywhere and counted as broadband.. Problem is, latency and caps are out the roof! But they are counted.. Wireless had promise, but with the 5 gig caps, its just more of a toy..

aztecnology
O Rly?
Premium
join:2003-02-12
Murrieta, CA
Monterey Park, seriously...? What kind of sick joke is this...

lakerfan82

join:2009-01-30
Corona, CA

Re: considering

I thought having Riverside, CA as #2 in the USA was also quite unbelievable. In 2008, I lived smack in the middle of Riverside and could only get "1.5Mbps" AT&T DSL, but it would max at about 680 kbps.

VladDracula

@sprintlink.net

Romania is #4 !!!

Bloody hell, mates!

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: Romania is #4 !!!

said by VladDracula :

Romania is #4 !!!
Bloody hell, mates!
But if you move there, you have to put up with Dracula tourists.
--
Are you happy with your rep in Washington, DC?
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1

Re: Romania is #4 !!!

said by FFH5:

said by VladDracula :

Romania is #4 !!!
Bloody hell, mates!
But if you move there, you have to put up with Dracula tourists.
Ha ha...not.

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

More Info

Akamai press release:
»www.akamai.com/html/about/press/···710.html

Get All the Charts from the report here included in one Zip file:
»wwwns.akamai.com/q110_soti_figures.zip
--
Are you happy with your rep in Washington, DC?

lt_wentoncha
Red6

join:2002-05-12
000000

Canada, Russia, Indonesia

These are the countries that most closely resemble the US in terms of geographic size or population. Where do they rank?

Soybomb

join:2002-07-15
Carbondale, IL

Re: Canada, Russia, Indonesia

This is spot on. I've never understood why people find it startling that the US doesn't have the most developed broadband network. The US is an enormous country with a very low population density. Of course Japan is going to have a better network, we're talking about a jillion people in a small area, easy to make a good ROI quickly.

funchords
Hello
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6

Re: Canada, Russia, Indonesia

said by Soybomb:

This is spot on. I've never understood why people find it startling that the US doesn't have the most developed broadband network. The US is an enormous country with a very low population density. Of course Japan is going to have a better network, we're talking about a jillion people in a small area, easy to make a good ROI quickly.
I've thought about it as an effect of what happened.

1st. We deployed first in late 1990s using that generation's equipment.
2nd. Then "they" deployed in early 2000s and late 2000s using that generation's equipment which was 4x faster at the same price.
3rd. Rather than dig up copper and coax for fiber, we milked the last mile revving some of the equipment but not the medium, so we got a big gain but not a revolutionary gain.
4th. "They" are doing the same thing with their improvements, but their starting baseline was higher than ours, so they continue to stay ahead.
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Cape Cod, MA -- KE1MO
Tweet! Tweet! -- »twitter.com/funchords

funchords
Hello
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6
said by Soybomb:

This is spot on. I've never understood why people find it startling that the US doesn't have the most developed broadband network. The US is an enormous country with a very low population density. Of course Japan is going to have a better network, we're talking about a jillion people in a small area, easy to make a good ROI quickly.
That excuse doesn't wash.

Four years, four different addresses, I've never lived in the "sticks" and I've never had fiber optic available to me at any one of them.
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Cape Cod, MA -- KE1MO
Tweet! Tweet! -- »twitter.com/funchords
SixSpeed

join:2001-12-24
USA

Re: Canada, Russia, Indonesia

said by funchords:

said by Soybomb:

This is spot on. I've never understood why people find it startling that the US doesn't have the most developed broadband network. The US is an enormous country with a very low population density. Of course Japan is going to have a better network, we're talking about a jillion people in a small area, easy to make a good ROI quickly.
That excuse doesn't wash.

Four years, four different addresses, I've never lived in the "sticks" and I've never had fiber optic available to me at any one of them.
Thank your legislators and the ridiculously outdated FCC who allow big corporations to cherry pick the most lucrative areas for network development and new product roll out. Low population areas aren't worth the investment in infrastructure.

Corporations yield power over the government via lobbyists and the laws and politicians they purchase daily. This is one of the downsides to a capitalist economy and society, sooner or later the corporations own us.
axus

join:2001-06-18
Washington, DC

Re: Canada, Russia, Indonesia

I don't see how the FCC preventing roll-outs would improve things.

espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
said by funchords:

Four years, four different addresses, I've never lived in the "sticks" and I've never had fiber optic available to me at any one of them.
That's because fiber by itself doesn't sell.

Verizon spent billions rolling out FiOS to the markets in which they've currently deployed, and despite having a clearly superior technology they're not hitting higher than a 20% adoption rate. General Motors aside, most companies don't pump a lot of investment into developing products that people don't buy.
SixSpeed

join:2001-12-24
USA

1 edit

Re: Canada, Russia, Indonesia

said by espaeth:

said by funchords:

Four years, four different addresses, I've never lived in the "sticks" and I've never had fiber optic available to me at any one of them.
That's because fiber by itself doesn't sell.

Verizon spent billions rolling out FiOS to the markets in which they've currently deployed, and despite having a clearly superior technology they're not hitting higher than a 20% adoption rate. General Motors aside, most companies don't pump a lot of investment into developing products that people don't buy.
Their delivery medium is advanced, not their content. Content is what sells and most people don't care how their content is delivered. Cable does just a good job if not better in a lot of content areas. I just switched to FiOs and have 25/25 internet service. You cant tell the difference surfing on 25/25 from the 6/2 I got with OOL.

Except for some really knockout HD stations, FiOs Tv is overrated in my opinion. OOL has better laid out package and easier to use TV menus and on demand menus as well as more channels that people actually watch.

The only reason I switched was the area I am in has an old infrastructure and CV couldn't get my service running properly.
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1
said by espaeth:

said by funchords:

Four years, four different addresses, I've never lived in the "sticks" and I've never had fiber optic available to me at any one of them.
That's because fiber by itself doesn't sell.

Verizon spent billions rolling out FiOS to the markets in which they've currently deployed, and despite having a clearly superior technology they're not hitting higher than a 20% adoption rate. General Motors aside, most companies don't pump a lot of investment into developing products that people don't buy.
Aside from the fact that you're lying (their adoption rate is 29%), Verizon has steadily raised their prices on FIOS. If they want higher adoption rates they need to lower their prices and increase their speeds. Add in the fact that they only recently dropped the 2 year contract requirement, and it's easy to see why their adoption rates are "low". The quotes are an indication of how ridiculous it is to consider 29% low. Free.fr offers a $40/month triple play and they manage a 33% rate.

The other side to consider is that Verizon is hemorrhaging DSL customers, but holding their own with FIOS. Once again your pro-corporation bias is showing.

funchords
Hello
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6
said by espaeth:

said by funchords:

Four years, four different addresses, I've never lived in the "sticks" and I've never had fiber optic available to me at any one of them.
That's because fiber by itself doesn't sell.

Verizon spent billions rolling out FiOS to the markets in which they've currently deployed, and despite having a clearly superior technology they're not hitting higher than a 20% adoption rate. General Motors aside, most companies don't pump a lot of investment into developing products that people don't buy.
Verizon doesn't have to put ANY content on it. Let everyone put content on it. Put Time Warner Cable through it. Put Netflix through it. The toll-road operator doesn't get rich making the road smooth for Fords.

Verizon could be the must-have technology that disrupts vertically-aligned media monopolies by cutting themselves in to ALL media, and it's as safe as featherbed because we've seen that overbuilders just don't come around very often.
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Cape Cod, MA -- KE1MO
Tweet! Tweet! -- »twitter.com/funchords
nasadude

join:2001-10-05
Rockville, MD
said by lt_wentoncha:

These are the countries that most closely resemble the US in terms of geographic size or population. Where do they rank?
IT NEVER FAILS! every time a report likes this comes out, showing the U.S. with mediocre broadband (at best), someone drags out the "we're such a big country" canard.

if geographic density is our "excuse", why in the hell isn't New York or LA one of the fastest cities in the survey?

the U.S. sucks in the rankings because we have a monopoly/duopoly market with very little competition. monopolies DO NOT innovate and they only upgrade when failure to do so would cause the consumer experience to degrade (and sometimes, they do let it degrade before they make improvements). The only other time they upgrade is when facing competition.

lt_wentoncha
Red6

join:2002-05-12
000000

Re: Canada, Russia, Indonesia

said by nasadude:

said by lt_wentoncha:

These are the countries that most closely resemble the US in terms of geographic size or population. Where do they rank?
IT NEVER FAILS! every time a report likes this comes out, showing the U.S. with mediocre broadband (at best), someone drags out the "we're such a big country" canard.

if geographic density is our "excuse", why in the hell isn't New York or LA one of the fastest cities in the survey?

the U.S. sucks in the rankings because we have a monopoly/duopoly market with very little competition. monopolies DO NOT innovate and they only upgrade when failure to do so would cause the consumer experience to degrade (and sometimes, they do let it degrade before they make improvements). The only other time they upgrade is when facing competition.
So it's fair to compare Broadband penetration between the US and Korea?
--
Arrogant People Suck.
AMW
FBI's Most Wanted
Interpol's MW

Z80A
Premium
join:2009-11-23

1 recommendation

Just shows the tiers people are buying

FiOS users for example have 50Mb service available to them, but most are plenty happy with the lower tiers.

So this is just reporting what people are buying and not what is available to them.
--
"Our goal (was to make) a billion phones Flash-enabled by 2010...We're actually going to get 1 billion Flash-enabled phones by 2009." -Adobe Chief Technology Officer Kevin Lynch in Nov 2008.

funchords
Hello
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6

Re: Just shows the tiers people are buying

said by Z80A:

FiOS users for example have 50Mb service available to them, but most are plenty happy with the lower tiers.
The questions people should be asking are

why?
when is it likely to change?
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Cape Cod, MA -- KE1MO
Tweet! Tweet! -- »twitter.com/funchords

Z80A
Premium
join:2009-11-23

1 edit

Re: Just shows the tiers people are buying

Because they can do with 15Mb what they could do with 50Mb. It certainly didn't a big deal over price as many of these tier bumps isn't a lot. For example VZ's 15/5 to 25/25 bump is $15. Same with my provider Cox, speed bump is about $15 for double the speed but most people don't bother. Most people don't give a crap so long as it is reliable.

It will change when there is a "killer app" that requires 15Mb+ speeds to work well.
--
"Our goal (was to make) a billion phones Flash-enabled by 2010...We're actually going to get 1 billion Flash-enabled phones by 2009." -Adobe Chief Technology Officer Kevin Lynch in Nov 2008.

funchords
Hello
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6

Re: Just shows the tiers people are buying

Exactly right.
said by Z80A:

It will change when there is a "killer app" that requires 15Mb+ speeds to work well.
And that won't happen until enough of us have the faster speeds available to us at prices that make sense.
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Cape Cod, MA -- KE1MO
Tweet! Tweet! -- »twitter.com/funchords
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL

Re: Just shows the tiers people are buying

What's the financial incentive for companies to lower prices on their higher speed tiers? If you like Net Neutrality thenthere is no incentive. If you're ani-Net-Neutrality then you can have content providers subsidizing a faster connection so all sorts of new applications are available.

I like Net Neutrality myself, but realistically a great unwashed masses could do everything they want right now on a 1.5/512 connection.
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1

Re: Just shows the tiers people are buying

said by iansltx:

What's the financial incentive for companies to lower prices on their higher speed tiers? If you like Net Neutrality thenthere is no incentive. If you're ani-Net-Neutrality then you can have content providers subsidizing a faster connection so all sorts of new applications are available.

I like Net Neutrality myself, but realistically a great unwashed masses could do everything they want right now on a 1.5/512 connection.
Financial incentive? You're right, there is no real competition. Why would they lower prices when they know no one can beat them?

Are you trying to argue opex? That is laughably small for cable companies, who manage insanely high 80% margins on their internet services.
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2

Re: Just shows the tiers people are buying

I'm not talking about opex. I'm asking why a provider would lower the pricing on their premium tiers if their net cash flow due to doing so would be negative anyway.

Z80A
Premium
join:2009-11-23
It won't happen until people demand it. People aren't going to demand it unless they have something they want to do with it.

kpfx

join:2005-10-28
San Antonio, TX
Exactly.... just looking at the "average" connection speed doesn't mean squat. It just shows what people get that works for them or what they're willing to pay for.

This is the first report that I've personally seen that finally notes that and breaks out the average maximum connection speeds available.

I've pointed out in the past that even here in San Antonio, almost everybody within the city has access to the top tiers from Time Warner (15-22ish Mbps) and AT&T (18-22ish Mbps). All the CLECs and over-builders also offer similar services. That's pretty close to what Akamai disclosed and is a much more respectable number.
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1

Re: Just shows the tiers people are buying

said by kpfx:

Exactly.... just looking at the "average" connection speed doesn't mean squat. It just shows what people get that works for them or what they're willing to pay for.

This is the first report that I've personally seen that finally notes that and breaks out the average maximum connection speeds available.

I've pointed out in the past that even here in San Antonio, almost everybody within the city has access to the top tiers from Time Warner (15-22ish Mbps) and AT&T (18-22ish Mbps). All the CLECs and over-builders also offer similar services. That's pretty close to what Akamai disclosed and is a much more respectable number.
Right, and when everyone has access to all the cable companies' $100+/month DOCSIS 3 tiers I'm sure you'll be crowing about how advanced the US is?
Gami00

join:2010-03-11
Mississauga, ON
said by kpfx:

Exactly.... just looking at the "average" connection speed doesn't mean squat. It just shows what people get that works for them or what they're willing to pay for.

this argument seems kinda worthless. all it means is in South Korea/Japan, they're paying the equivalent that we're paying here but are geting 30 to 40 Mbps as their average payed for spd. it probably means they have access to the 100/100 Mbps speed, but don't need it..
qworster

join:2001-11-25
Bryn Mawr, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon FiOS

2 edits

In Secaucus, NJ

In Secaucus, NJ, TWO MILES across the Hudson River from midtown Manhattan, the fastest DSL you can get is 1 meg down and 384K up. Why? Verizon is too cheap to install any remote terminals in this town of 15,000. There is no FiOS. There is Comcast, but since it's essentially the only game in town, it's expensive.
THIS is the USA broadband plan that the Bush FCC adopted thanks to big bucks lobbying from big cable and telco.

A monopoly!

We're not talking the boonies here-we're talking METRO NEW YORK CITY!

••••••••
kernelpanic

join:2010-07-06
Crowley, TX

diff results

this data is quite a bit different than the ookla data shown on speedtest.net which shows a U.S. average of 8.35 Mbps
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2

Re: diff results

That's because Ookla has a SIGNIFICANT upward bias due to only techier folks speed testing their connections.

Vamp9190
Premium
join:2002-02-11
Chantilly, VA
kudos:1

Wow - Nice World average

The Stat that caught my eye was the world average of 1.7 -- that seems really fast considering there could be a lot more slower areas dragging that avg down. Probably the IPs connecting to those servers are the major cities in most countries, and one or two cities represents the "speed" for the entire country.

Onew

@verizon.net

Computer Games

A lot of you guys are asking what they'd do with such a faster connection? If you look at South Korea's internet market, a big unique part of it (that a lot of Americans can't fathom to imagine) is online free MMORPG gaming. That's right, free games with graphics as advanced as games on the Xbox. (check »heroes.nexon.com/Intro.aspx)(my mouth kind of ripped wide open when my friend told me this was free). Also, if you look at Korean web sites and media portals, they have a lot more content as far as things like interfaces, java applets, etc. because they're not hindered by the problems Americans face when they enter a webpage with too many java apps that freezes or slows down their browsing. Basically, having higher connection speed does matter, because it gives room for innovation - web pages can become more and more innovative, with intricate interfaces, as well as the media streaming segment being more high quality.