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Cablevision Offers You A Channel For Internet Content
'PC to TV Media Relay' transmits any Internet data to a dedicated TV channel
by Karl Bode 09:29AM Wednesday Feb 24 2010
Starting in June, Cablevision says that the company will be testing a new service called "PC to TV Media Relay." The short and sweet of it: the service will allow users to view, listen or watch any Internet website content on a dedicated cable TV channel in the home. So far PC only, the service requires a software download for your computer, but will work over your existing cable set top. Most of our more tech savvy customers already have solutions in place, but it sounds like a good way for less technical users to bridge the sometimes cumbersome office/living room broadband video divide.

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Users will of course reasonably have privacy concerns, however. Content from your PC or the Internet travels in real-time up through the Cablevision network and then gets sent back down to the television, through the set-top box.

The consumer views the content - which can include any number of broadband services including Web video, Pandora music, family photos or videos, your iTunes library, documents/e-mails - on their own dedicated digital cable channel on the television.

"With our PC to TV Media Relay service, we are putting an end to the need for families to huddle around their laptops or PCs to watch content together," Cablevision COO Tom Rutledge said in a press release. (pdf) "This new service will make it easy for our television customers to take broadband services including Internet video, as well as family photos or anything else displayed on a computer screen and move it to the television with the click of the mouse."

We've confirmed with Cablevision that this includes Hulu, which is a move you probably wouldn't see some of the more tight-fisted cable TV operators embrace for fear of cannibalizing their own TV channels. Of course Hulu might not like this. You'll recall that Hulu blocked Boxee simply for offering living room access to the Hulu website. While Jeff Zucker, President and CEO of NBC, accused Boxee of "illegally taking" Hulu content, all Boxee was doing was offering users TV-based browser access.

That means Cablevision could find themselves in a similar fight with Hulu or NBC (and eventually Comcast), given they too are simply allowing users to access the Hulu website from their living room. Cablevision has already had their share of fun with NBC after NBC (and a number of other broadcasters) sued Cablevision for their plans to offer network-based DVR services. Cablevision tells Broadband Reports those plans are still on track, and to stay tuned for an announcement on that front.

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dvd536
as Mr. Pink as they come
Premium
join:2001-04-27
Phoenix, AZ
kudos:4

What a great way. . .

For cablevision to see what is on your computer.
for me additional software would be the deal killer for me.
--
When I gez aju zavateh na nalechoo more new yonooz tonigh molinigh - Ken Lee

mod_wastrel
anonome

join:2008-03-28
kudos:1

2.0?

If it walks like WebTV, and it talks like WebTV...

Toadman
Hypnotoad

join:2001-11-28
Ex Ohioan
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest

1 edit

1 recommendation

Billy is watching Mr. Smiths porn

I would assume this would work the same as in demand, broadcasting it on a clear digital channel. Most likely it won't be encrypted, so any zitty 12 year old can take his new digital HDTV tuner and tune in what you are watching. Hopefully nothing too sensitive, like your online banking, tax software, or better yet that foot fetish you are into.
--
This post is made with meat biproducts.

dvd536
as Mr. Pink as they come
Premium
join:2001-04-27
Phoenix, AZ
kudos:4

Re: Billy is watching Mr. Smiths porn

said by Toadman:

like your online banking, tax software,
I bet the identity thieves are chomping at the bit waiting for this new source of idiots to tap.
--
When I gez aju zavateh na nalechoo more new yonooz tonigh molinigh - Ken Lee

tnroroc
Let's Rock

join:2001-04-25
New Jersey

Sure..

Let's add to the already daily bandwidth slowdown with this stuff.

cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
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1 edit

How's it work?

Wow how does that work?

What if your playing a 720p or 1080i MKV file?
What is it a program that captures what's on your PC, sends it out your modem via the upstream, relay's it off a server and streams it to the set top just like VOD?

Wouldn't the modem network limit throughput? What is the resolution of the PC to TV Relay channel? Is it 4:3 SD centered on an HDTV, or is it full HD?

Edit: found article
»www.lightreading.com/doc ··· r_cable&

fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2

Re: How's it work?

said by cypherstream:

Wow how does that work?

What if your playing a 720p or 1080i MKV file?
I have no doubt that they'll limit it.

dvd536
as Mr. Pink as they come
Premium
join:2001-04-27
Phoenix, AZ
kudos:4

Re: How's it work?

said by fifty nine:

said by cypherstream:

Wow how does that work?

What if your playing a 720p or 1080i MKV file?
I have no doubt that they'll limit it.
your upstream will limit that. you won't be watching that 25mbps blu ray rip at 25mbps if your upload caps out at 5mbps!
--
When I gez aju zavateh na nalechoo more new yonooz tonigh molinigh - Ken Lee
hottboiinnc4
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH
1080i??? what about 1080p? the NEW format.
--
www.two-pugs.com www.twopugsbrand.com
tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
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too little too late?

anyone with a modern video card can output media to their hi-def tv's using a HDMI cable without too much hassle. a couple of advantages (of transfering to a "channel") are the capability to stream to any or all set-tops at once and stream LIVE content multicasted at a site. this is the kind of evolution of cable-tv that should have happened 5+ years ago. i also expected verizon to have done something such as this instead of loading up on widgets and telephone service fees ($10-$12) in addition to the fcc line/subscriber charge.

my (rhetorical) question is, what happens when someone makes a widget/patch/hack that ends up streaming p2p torrents to the channel.. in 'blatant' violation of tos? think the copyright holders are pissed about cablevision doing a network dvr, how happy will they be with this?

DaveDude
No Fear

join:1999-09-01
New Jersey
kudos:1

2 edits

cablevision is always ahead of comcast.

Gee comcast, what do you have to offer, oh nothing....
majortom1029

join:2006-10-19
Lindenhurst, NY
kudos:1

hmm

This actually might get around the hulu problem. If this works the way it says its like viewing the content on a tv channel. Since the content gets streamed to cablevision first the content providers can keep a good watch on the content.

fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2

Re: hmm

said by majortom1029:

This actually might get around the hulu problem.
You can get around the hulu "problem" by attaching a PC to your TV.
majortom1029

join:2006-10-19
Lindenhurst, NY
kudos:1

Re: hmm

not everybody has the space or money to attach a pc to there tv.
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2

I don't think this will ruffle feathers with Hulu

A TV subscription is still required (remember, this comes through an STB) so the sacred cash cow is preserved.