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Clearwire Starting TD-LTE Network Build
Build Begins This Quarter, Launch Still in June of 2013
by Karl Bode 04:16PM Wednesday Sep 19 2012
Clearwire says the company will begin building their TD-LTE network during this quarter, with plans to significantly ramp up the build by the fourth quarter of this year. Speaking at an investment conference this week, Clearwire re-iterated that their goal is to have 5,000 LTE cell sites up and running by June of 2013. The company had previously suggested they would start the build in the first quarter of this year, claiming that their LTE network will be capable of top theoretical speeds of 168 Mbps downstream. Clearwire will of course be needing money and some new investors; Google offloaded their investment in the company in the first quarter, and Time Warner Cable sold their 7.8% stake this week.

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Eek2121

join:2002-10-12
Newton, NJ
Reviews:
·FreedomPop

Coverage

Clearwire's biggest issue is coverage. They will never be able to grow as a company unless they cover more people.
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Metatron2008
Premium
join:2008-09-02
united state

Re: Coverage

They could cover more if they actually used their spectrum...

whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by Eek2121:

Clearwire's biggest issue is coverage. They will never be able to grow as a company unless they cover more people.

Their coverage in urban areas is pretty good. I think they really need to focus on a handfull of markets and consider lowering the price a little.

I imagine many people would pay $25/mo for something like a 10/5 USB hotspot or USB dongle.

BBandB

@sbcglobal.net

Bullplop!

They endlessly launch useless tech without really building up the predecessors. 3G coverage barely covers large portions of the population, 4G barely covers half, 4GLTE only covers certain very tiny spots (You're actually better off with Wifi in most cases, in fact most cellphone stores use wifi to demo 4G and 4LTE services).

At this point, you're better off just driving to your local starbucks and using their wireless internet. It'll certainly have better speed and probably have better range than this "TD-LTE" garbage they're pushing out.

...And you thought Verizon 4G was expensive.
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast

Re: Bullplop!

Uh...you're the one who's full of BS. The LTE on ym iPad (VZW) will beat 99% of WiFi hotspots to pieces, as long as I'm in an LTE coverage area (any big city in the Lower 48, plus lots of medium-sized ones) Coverage is reasonable, too.

We aren't talking about Clear WiMAX here, which admittedly has coverage issues, particularly if you're using a mobile device to access their network.

Speaking of Clear, the point of their TD-LTE system will be to deliver breakneck speeds to a small area, offloading users who would normally be clogging up the macro-cellular network at large events, schools, airports and the like. So that way, when you walk into /name of team/ stadium, your service will get better instead of failing altogether.

banananaz

@spcsdns.net

Re: Bullplop!

The problem is clears crappy 2.6ghz spectrum which can't penetrate buildings for crap. If lte will be in the same range its going to be just as crappy.

whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

Re: Bullplop!

said by banananaz :

The problem is clears crappy 2.6ghz spectrum which can't penetrate buildings for crap. If lte will be in the same range its going to be just as crappy.

It's crappy but at the same time very good spectrum. It's geared towards very dense deployments. Imagine if they are able to come to an agreement with the cable MSOs and deploy on cable lines (sort of like WiFi ap's are today).

You might even look at some situations of where they could deploy on street poles etc. There is a lot of potential if clearwire can keep it's Wimax spectrum holdings (the broad spotty coverage).

Then they could really build out a dense LTE-TD network in a few cities and really own those cities. Almost all the congestion is in urban areas and they plan to make a significant chunk of their cash selling excess capacity to other carriers.

I'm curious if they plan to offer a retail solution to customers directly or keep the LTE-TD network strictly wholesale.
hottboiinnc
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH

1 recommendation

Re: Bullplop!

Clear could do that without the MSOs. They just need to go to the cities and power companies and get access to the street lights. They could create a HUGE Network without any issues. An AP every X amount of poles, and all backhauled to the tower. They'd give any DSL and MSO a run for their money. Especially since it'd be totally wireless. They could do mobile that way and fixed.

Rambo76098

join:2003-02-21
Columbus, OH
Reviews:
·WOW Internet and..
Yeah, no. 75% of the population has access to VZW LTE. 371 markets.

»gigaom.com/mobile/verizons-lte-j···ulation/

And personally, I pay $50 plus tax for a smartphone with VZW after loyal customer and employer discounts.
Eek2121

join:2002-10-12
Newton, NJ
Reviews:
·FreedomPop

Re: Bullplop!

Population by percentage? Maybe, though i doubt that number. Population by geography? Not even close. My entire county as well as most of the area west of me is without 4G LTE. Don't get me wrong I like Verizon, but articles like that really skew the numbers. I can drive 100 miles in any direction from my house and at least half the time i'll be in 3g. Oh and i live in NJ.
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brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1

Bankrupt

How can a company on the verge of Bankruptcy continue to expand with new technologies?
hottboiinnc
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH

Re: Bankrupt

Because Sprint gives them money and so does their Wholesale partners.
buckweet1980

join:2011-12-31
Allen, TX

Why TD-LTE??

Are they going with TD-LTE because of max theoretical bandwidth capabilities??? I believe FD-LTE maxes out at 100Mbps??

I fear they're just going down the path of Wi-Max again, going against what everyone else has standardized on in the US. Wi-Max bit them (and sprint) now they're doing it again!!
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast

Re: Why TD-LTE??

TD-LTE is standardized.

The difference between TD- and FD- is TD-LTE gets deployed on unpaired spectrum (the stuff that Clear has) while FD-LTE gets deployed on paired spectrum (what Sprint, Verizon, etc. have). Two sides to the same coin, if you will, though the TD side does a lot better with download speeds, which seems to be what mobile networks need a lot of right now (FD is better for more symmetric communications like...surprise...voice).

JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

Re: Why TD-LTE??

that's pretty awesome actually
no att lte in my area but lots of wiimax
att needs to hurry up >:|
nickn

join:2012-09-19
Chicago, IL

meh

I posted this on another site, but will repost it here. Again, why is everyone so fixated on LTE????? The biggest problem right now that carriers should be concerned about is back haul bandwidth, not wireless coding methods. According to one article written in 2009, at that time, over 90% of Clearwire and Sprint WiMAX towers were connected via microwave back haul. Another site claimed each microwave link had a total capacity of 80mbps. Think about that for a second. In several other countries, individual houses are getting 1gbps+ fiber connections, but here, the entire cell site to be shared amongst hundreds or even thousands is wired at 80mbps??? WiMAX 1 has theoretical max download speeds of 37mbps per user. In my testing across the U.S., even when within 100 feet of a Clearwire/Sprint tower, speeds average around 10mbps. What is switching to LTE towers going to do? I could hook up a fancy new Wireless AC router to my 6mbps DSL line, but what is going to change??? Clearwire should have gone all out with the WiMAX network and gotten speeds as fast as possible on that network before even considering a switch to LTE. Now they have two 4G networks that are only meh at best, as both still dont have the bandwidth to really be 4G networks, and soon will have a fragmented device lineup between WiMax and LTE devices.

tiger72
SexaT duorP
Premium
join:2001-03-28
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:1

Re: meh

Yeah, backhaul isn't their problem. You can always increase the number of microwave links. Spectrum and tower placement is their problem. Clear was stingy with WiMax spectrum, and even more stingy with base station placement. Wimax has no peak theoretical per user - peaks are for an entire cell. There is no guarantee per user, as that's dependent on cell load, distance, obstacles, etc.
Moreover, there can be any number of cells on a tower depending on how they want to configure it based on usage in the area. It's quite a bit more complicated than simply whatever the backhaul to the base station is.
Hell, you can have 10GigE to a base station, but if you've only got 10mhz of spectrum allocated (even though Clear has about 150mhz available to them) then you're only gonna get ~40mbps per cell.

Your end-user testing is fatally flawed from the get-go. First of all, Clear throttles connections. They definitely throttle on the upload (i can't recall if it's 1mbps or 1.5mbps, I believe just 1), and the download may or may not be capped as well. Since you aren't a network engineer for Clear, you can't know what network management they've got going on that's affecting speeds. In other words, end-user results are never a good judgement of technology being used, other than to establish minimums. That is, if you're getting 22mbps on an HSPA+ network, you can be sure that you're on 42mbps HSPA+ at least for T-Mobile. However, if you're getting 4mbps you could be on 7.2mbps HSDPA, 21mbps HSPA+ *or* 42mbps HSPA+, since you have no clue about what your cell's overall load is, and thus why exactly you're getting the speeds you're getting.

Switching to LTE is simply moving over to a single wireless standard. Being on a standard means a higher likelihood of device support (at lower prices) in the future, as well as more potential customers (not direct consumers, mind you, but roaming/capacity partners like ATT/Sprint/TMO and Euro roamers).
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