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Comcast Will Finish IPv6 Upgrades Early Next Year
by Karl Bode 10:28AM Wednesday Nov 27 2013
Comcast continues to blaze a trail in terms of IPv6 deployment, a company blog post this week stating that 75% of the Comcast network now has native IPv6 support, and that the company expects to finish their IPv6 deployment entirely by sometime early in 2014. "Today, over 25% (and growing) of Comcast’s Xfinity Internet customers are actively provisioned with native dual stack broadband Internet service," says the company. The Internet Society (ISOC) measurements confirm Comcast now leads the industry with the largest IPv6 deployment. The milestone comes nearly eight years after the company began their IPv6 upgrade plan, and about four years after they began consumer IPv6 trials.


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vpoko
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join:2003-07-03
Boston, MA

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reply to raydsltech

Re: A Leader Here

Just because an external node sends a packet to a device on your network doesn't mean your firewall has to allow that packet to reach the device. All packets entering your network still go through the firewall; if there's no rule allowing the packet through (and no recent packet went out from that port), it gets dropped. NAT's not essential to the process.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

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reply to Bengie25

Re: Let the random connection drops begin!

said by Bengie25:

So the modem uses DHCP to get assigned, then it passes this onto the local LAN as RA or DHCPv6?

Yes.

said by Bengie25:

Sounds kind of weird because IPv6 doesn't require DHCPv6 to work. Actually DHCP was an after-thought. The engineers considered DHCP to be a kludge, but eventually enough pressure was put on by people who are used to DHCP, to add it.

It is not weird at all. RA cannot do prefix delegation. So it can't do the job. RA also cannot do reserved address allocation.

said by Bengie25:

The recommendation is not to use DHCP, but RA. Or at least it was for the past few decades. That may have changed now.

There is no such recommendation. RA is required to be implemented by OS's that support v6 but that's it. That's not a recommendation. OS's that want to be usable in the real world will have to implement DHCPv6 as there are environments where RA will not be used at all such as Enterprise environments and universities which is already the case.

said by Bengie25:

DHCP is effectively doing what DNS was designed to handle. No engineer like two different things doing similar things but in different and sometimes conflicting ways.

DHCP and DNS have nothing to do with each other. One (DHCP) is for assigning IP address space/IP netblocks and other network configuration settings like DNS servers/NTP servers and so forth. The other is for translating host names to IP addresses and vice versa.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

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reply to Bink

Re: A Leader Here

said by Bink:

Riiight after they recoup the massive cost of being an early adopter of IPv6…

Being years behind the curve is not an early adopter. It is more like dragging their feet less than most of the rest of the industry. It is also debatable how much they really spent. They did not replace their CMTS gear and if they did replace any other network gear it was part of their refresh cycles to do network upgrades; as in it was not specifically for v6 but it could benefit the roll out. What other spending they did like CMS integration of certain aspects of v6 provisioning and such is just part of doing business.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

2 recommendations

reply to tshirt

Re: Let the random connection drops begin!

Not surprising that real world implementations of software has bugs, this isn't exactly a new concept and goes on all over the place. What is truly pathetic is that the whole situation would be a whole lot better off if the industry as a whole started this work 5-6 years ago instead of this absolutely ridiculous feet dragging to the very last minute. Everything about what is going on is standardized. Most of the issues being run into are implementation issues not a lack of standards.

Bink
Villains... knock off all that evil

join:2006-05-14
Castle Rock, CO
kudos:4

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reply to raydsltech

Re: A Leader Here

Same way you do now—a firewall—but this is getting a bit off topic and probably best hashed out in the appropriate forum.

Bink
Villains... knock off all that evil

join:2006-05-14
Castle Rock, CO
kudos:4

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reply to raydsltech
NAT doesn’t keep you safe—it just translates packets. What does tend to keep you safe is the firewall and Stateful Packet Inspection and this tends to be employed by most devices doing NAT, but it can/is used without NAT as well.


Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:42

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reply to Bink
They've honestly been pretty great ever since the BitTorrent fiasco about transparency regarding network security and infrastructure moves.

Bink
Villains... knock off all that evil

join:2006-05-14
Castle Rock, CO
kudos:4

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Comcast gets A LOT wrong, but they got this one right.