dslreports logo
site
spacer

spacer
 
   
spc
story category
FCC Approves Dish LTE Plans
With H Block Interference Protections
by Karl Bode 10:47AM Wednesday Dec 12 2012
The FCC has unanimously voted to approve Dish's plans to build an LTE network, though there will be build requirements and interference protections built in to the arrangement, and a living, breathing Dish LTE network is anything but certain. Dish has been lobbying the FCC for the past year to lift conditions built into their AWS-4 spectrum requiring they embed satellite phone chips into handsets that use it. Those requirements have been lifted by the FCC.

Click for full size
In exchange, Dish will get to use the spectrum for LTE if they agree to cordon off a chunk of the spectrum to prevent interference with the H Block. Dish will also be required to build out at least 70% of the new network within six years.

"These actions will help meet skyrocketing consumer demand and promote private investment, innovation, and competition, while unlocking billions of dollars of value," the FCC said in a statement.

Dish's LTE network, rumored to launch under the brand name "Ollo," isn't expected to see the light of day until around 2015 when the LTE Advanced gear they plan to use on the S band is available. Some analysts have argued that Dish isn't serious, and that the network build is simply a stage play designed to bump up the value of the spectrum ahead of a sale.

In recent weeks however, there have been numerous leaks suggesting Dish has been conducting talks with everyone from Google to Sprint, with some rumors suggesting the company had even been contemplating a Clearwire takeover. Though rumors of a Sprint partnership have heated up this week, it still remains unclear if a Dish LTE network will ever actually see the light of day.

"The Commission has taken an important step toward facilitating wireless competition and innovation," Jeff Blum, Dish senior VP said in a statement released to the media. "Following a more thorough review of the order and its technical details, Dish will consider its strategic options and the optimal approach to put this spectrum to use."

view:
topics flat nest 
xenophon

join:2007-09-17

Sprint may host it

Dish has been working with Sprint's to host it but they had the interference issues, which now appear to be resolved. Sprint's new Vision infrastructure is designed to pop in cards for 3rd party networks, sorta like telcom hotel thing but for cellsites.

My guess is that Dish will work with Sprint to host it but Dish may eventually get out of biz and Sprint will end up acquiring the Dish spectrum in the end.

Under this scenario, Sprint doesn't really need to buy Clearwire. Dish spectrum is more desirable.

IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA

Worst customer service

Dish Network's customer service is the worst which is why I went back to Comcast. DirecTV is much better (although more expensive than bundling TV with my phone and Internet with Comcast).
flycuban

join:2005-04-25
Homestead, FL

Re: Worst customer service

And this has nothing to do with customer service LOL

IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA

Re: Worst customer service

What I am saying is I'd never do business with Dish again after I had a bad experience with them.

Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1

6 years?

I think it will be a waste to roll out LTE now as in 6 years, there will be something new already!
flycuban

join:2005-04-25
Homestead, FL

Re: 6 years?

Its gonna be LTE Super Advanced +100 by then

Metatron2008
Premium
join:2008-09-02
united state
Why rollout 3g in the past?
TBBroadband

join:2012-10-26
Fremont, OH

Re: 6 years?

and sadly there are companies still rolling out 3g and expanding it to CMDA-Rev. B claiming its new and improved.

TriForce

join:2008-05-27
Chico, CA
LTE is going to scale well. That's why it's called "Long Term" Evolution. In 6 years, it will still be very capable. We aren't anywhere close to the maximum gigabit speed of LTE.

Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1

Re: 6 years?

6 years in this type of technology is LT.

Metatron2008
Premium
join:2008-09-02
united state

1 recommendation

Re: 6 years?

And saying you shouldn't rollout a new technology because another one is coming is is called being shortsighted, what is your point with this?

Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1

Re: 6 years?

said by Metatron2008:

And saying you shouldn't rollout a new technology because another one is coming is is called being shortsighted, what is your point with this?

I didn't say they shouldn't roll it out

Metatron2008
Premium
join:2008-09-02
united state

Re: 6 years?

You said it was a waste

Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1

Re: 6 years?

And? I think it is. Your point?

bbeesley
VIP
join:2003-08-07
Richardson, TX
kudos:5
said by Cheese:

I didn't say they shouldn't roll it out

I disagree with your premise that LTE will be obsolete anytime in the next six years but that said...

What would you have them deploy today?

Are you suggesting that they are better off perpetually awaiting whatever magical technology is coming next rather then generating revenue with what is currently available?

Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1

Re: 6 years?

said by bbeesley:

said by Cheese:

I didn't say they shouldn't roll it out

I disagree with your premise that LTE will be obsolete anytime in the next six years but that said...

What would you have them deploy today?

Are you suggesting that they are better off perpetually awaiting whatever magical technology is coming next rather then generating revenue with what is currently available?

Are you guys who have responded really that illiterate? I never SAID it would be obsolete. I said there will be something BETTER in 6 years.

Reading comprehension, works WONDERS.

bbeesley
VIP
join:2003-08-07
Richardson, TX
kudos:5

Re: 6 years?

said by Cheese:

I said there will be something BETTER in 6 years.

and there will be something better six years after that...this platitude is relatively obvious to anyone with a pulse

I still maintain that your suggestion that they wait for something better is nonsensical.

If they were to follow your advice, they would never deploy anything.

Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1

Re: 6 years?

Again, point out exactly where I said they should wait? Reading comprehension, it does wonders.

bbeesley
VIP
join:2003-08-07
Richardson, TX
kudos:5

Re: 6 years?

said by Cheese:

Again, point out exactly where I said they should wait?

"I think it will be a waste to roll out LTE now"

yep, can't imagine how I would have gotten the impression you suggested that.


Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1

Re: 6 years?

said by bbeesley:

said by Cheese:

Again, point out exactly where I said they should wait?

"I think it will be a waste to roll out LTE now"

yep, can't imagine how I would have gotten the impression you suggested that.

Again, no where in that post, do I say they shouldn't. I said "I think"... that's called an opinion.

I guess you see what you want to see

bbeesley
VIP
join:2003-08-07
Richardson, TX
kudos:5

Re: 6 years?

said by Cheese:

Again, no where in that post, do I say they shouldn't. I said "I think"... that's called an opinion.

And I classified your reasoning behind that opinion as specious

that said, I'll bite

what do you "think" they should deploy now to get market share and revenue.
Telco

join:2008-12-19
Reviews:
·Callcentric
said by Cheese:

I think it will be a waste to roll out LTE now as in 6 years, there will be something new already!

You don't know what you are talking about. 3G WCDMA started out at 384kbit/s, yet it has now reached close to 42Mbit/s.

LTE are European tech that is designed to be scalable. It's not some CDMA or Wimax, where you build it and it becomes useless down the track.

I think you are confusing this for tech for Florida.
clone

join:2000-12-11
Portage, IN

Re: 6 years?

You don't know what you are talking about either. CDMA »www.cdg.org/resources/cdma_history.asp was first conceptualized in 1988, ratified as a standard in 1993, and the first networks went into service around that same time. EVDO was developed in the late 90s (97-99 timeframe), and is still here 15 years later.

So, really, us Americans build something and "it becomes useless down the track"? What a load. I'd say a 20 year old technology held up pretty good, considering it's probably going to be a 30 year old technology by the time it's retired from voice use. But it's not European, so it must be inferior. (hint: LTE is not a European technology, and the first WCDMA networks went into service in Japan in 2001 and were in use in the United States in 2004, before most of Europe).

CDMA has been up and running since the 90s, and with EVDO it kept pace with 3G GSM technologies. People bemoan the max speed of 3.1Mbit/sec on Rev.A (which is higher with newer Protocol Revisions), but that is per sector, per 1.25MHz EVDO channel. A cell site has 3 sectors with multiple channels running. So yeah, the MAX you'll ever get on your handset is 3.1Mbit/sec (darn) , but it's not like one site is only capable of providing 3.1Mbit/sec to all its users. If you look at the spectral efficiency of 5MHz of EVDO (3 EVDO channels, the minimum channel size is 5MHz for one channel of 3G WCDMA), it's somewhere around 9.3Mbit/sec. Not bad for a technology older than UMTS. If you want to get really technical, Rev. B bumps a 5MHz channel up to around 15Mbit/sec and drops latency to around 40ms.

You make it sound like CDMA was installed in 2005 and died on the vine. Nothing is further from the truth.

If your beef with American-developed technologies is that they keep running fine for so long that greedy operators fail to move forward until the last possible second, then say that. But saying that our technologies don't scale really is untrue.
kem09030

join:2004-11-29
Rushville, IL
Actually they are rolling out something other than the LTE currently being deployed. LTE-A or LTE advanced. Most of the gear now just requires a software upgrade. IIRC the early gear requires a lot more to get it to LTE-A. I think only one carrier in the US used some of that early gear.