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FCC Loosens Rules on 56-64 GHz Spectrum
by Karl Bode 06:22PM Tuesday Aug 13 2013
In addition to passing rules that prohibit the predatory gouging of prison inmates and families for phone calls, the FCC has passed new rules that streamline the regulations surrounding ultra-high frequency spectrum in the 57-64 GHz band. In a statement, the FCC stated that they increased power allowances in the band to pave the way for backhaul alternatives capable of delivering speeds up to 7 Gbps up to a mile.

The new rules "will enhance the use of unlicensed spectrum as a relatively low‑cost, high‑capacity short‑range backhaul alternative to connect wireless broadband networks and for other wireless applications," the FCC said. The FCC noted the impacted bands can also be used for HD streaming via the 802.11ad standard.

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brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1

Nice

I could use a Router that can send at that speed.

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

Re: Nice

what would the range of that be 5 feet?
LTE4LIFE

join:2013-02-28

Re: Nice

why only 1 mile? satellite is using the 18-35Ghz which goes thousands of miles.
Kamus

join:2011-01-27
El Paso, TX
said by 88615298:

what would the range of that be 5 feet?

This is meant for point to point links... and with the right application, it's a game changer.
brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1
1 mile

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

Re: Nice

said by brianiscool:

1 mile

I highly doubt a router can go a mile. You can't even do that with wi-fi at 2.4 GHz

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

1 recommendation

Re: Nice

And to think about all of those 20-30 mile imaginary WiFi connections I setup for years.

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

Re: Nice

said by battleop:

And to think about all of those 20-30 mile imaginary WiFi connections I setup for years.

We're talking REGULAR connections. Try keeping up. No one is going to wally world buying a router and have it magically connect to a computer 20 miles away. Yes I know about being able to send a wi-fi signal miles away. Have know for YEARS. Sorry you're attempt at one upsmanship has failed. Once again to make this crystal clear, in case you didn't quite get it, the first time, NORMAL regular people with NORMAL regular connections. Got it? Feel free to PM me if you are still confused.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Nice

Really? I've got APs I've connected to with a laptop without special external antennas that are more than a mile away. Yes this is the plain jane AP you can pick up at Wal-Mart.

If you want to come out of the boonies for a demonstration feel free to come on down to Chattanooga and I'll show you where you can take your pick of APs more than a mile away (provided they are not locked down by now)

There are several places here in town where I can park and sit on my tail gate and hit APs and surf for free at at least 1Mb.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

Re: Nice

said by battleop:

Really? I've got APs I've connected to with a laptop without special external antennas that are more than a mile away. Yes this is the plain jane AP you can pick up at Wal-Mart.

If you want to come out of the boonies for a demonstration feel free to come on down to Chattanooga and I'll show you where you can take your pick of APs more than a mile away (provided they are not locked down by now)

There are several places here in town where I can park and sit on my tail gate and hit APs and surf for free at at least 1Mb.

Sure Chattanooga is 4 1/2 hour drive for me. Where do you live? At any rate you're arguing just to argue so stop it. Is there a reason why you have to but into a conversation your not a part of just to start shit?

Amazing how people with wireless N routers working on 5 GHz have issues with a signal going beyond 50 feet. But magically a router with 60 GHz capacity can go 20 miles. Ok whatever.

So either contribute to the topic or move on. My next step for you is my ignore list.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Nice

"But magically a router with 60 GHz capacity can go 20 miles"

I said that?

Killa200
Premium
join:2005-12-02
Southeast TN
Reviews:
·Charter
said by battleop:

feel free to come on down to Chattanooga

Just to be off topic, I so did not realize I had other WISP oriented people living this close to me,

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Nice

The city of Chattanooga pretty much ran the remaining active WISPs out of town with all of their wireless.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

Killa200
Premium
join:2005-12-02
Southeast TN

Re: Nice

Yeah i didn't think anything was fairing too well in the area with all the Motorola gear and EPB's GPON all over the place. I'd bank even Comcast is hurting now a days.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Nice

They are now going after PBX vendors and computer repair type companies. Rumor is that they will be after alarm companies next.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

Smith6612
Premium,MVM
join:2008-02-01
North Tonawanda, NY
kudos:23
Point to Point Wi-Fi on 2.4Ghz can go for miles. But in practicality, yes, several hundred feet at most for 2.4Ghz.
jp10558
Premium
join:2005-06-24
Willseyville, NY

Re: Nice

With consumer gear and slightly larger antennas available, I can get 802.11b speeds at 700 feet, through trees.
rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO

ONLY 7Gbps?

If the new AC spec can deliver a theoretical 1Gbps with 80mhz channels, all 7Ghz of spectrum can do is 7Gbps? With that much spectrum, I'd think a 1Ghz-wide channel could easily deliver 10Gbps. Even though unlicensed, are there rules about how much of the spectrum a single end point can consume?

I've read this spectrum has high atmospheric attenuation due to resonance with oxygen molecules. The FCC supposedly increased the maximum transmit power by a factor of 16,000. I don't know what the old power limits were but even ridiculously feeble transmission powers get pretty beefy when multiplied by 16,000.
elefante72

join:2010-12-03
East Amherst, NY

Re: ONLY 7Gbps?

This oxygen absorption makes it an excellent candidate for P2P applications if the beam is sufficiently narrow you can have thousands of nodes per sq mile.

This is important for three use cases (probably more):

1. Short-range backhaul. Carriers can go wild on P2P wireless backhaul for macrocells, without having to license microwave frequencies. This is probably more of use in denser urban areas.

2. Neighborhood wireless delivery. Want to get rid of aging copper. Replace it with fixed wireless, without having to pay a dime in licensing fees. Imagine not having to rewire the burbs or for rural environments where density is low. One only has to run fiber along main roadways. This eliminates the 2 and 5 Ghz omni bath that most neighborhoods face.

3. Wireless video delivery. Bye bye moca. This is more a near-field experience however this is licensed for indoor use also. May be of use more for wireless delivery to your TV or from a tablet to a TV.
rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO

Re: ONLY 7Gbps?

I don't see how it works for neighborhood wireless delivery (assuming you mean from main road to home.) 60ghz doesn't penetrate structures and foliage causes severe attenuation.

Are you referring to some sort of stepped approach where this is used from road to node (where line-of-sight could be "engineered") and the node then links to the home with something that would penetrate foliage and structures?

RWSI

join:2012-11-27
Albuquerque, NM

60 GHz

At 60GHz oxygen absorbs the microwaves at that frequency, that is the reason they give the spectrum away. 1 mile of usage and maybe we can go broke installing expensive gear light pole to light pole.

dongato17
VIP
join:2000-07-28
Atlanta, GA

Re: 60 GHz

Just another tool in the toolbox.
--
Harold Bledsoe
zerog

join:2002-02-10
Carrollton, TX
kudos:1

UHF?

Minor point, but it's not UHF, it's considered EHF

UHF = 300 MHz - 3 GHz
SHF = 3 GHz - 30 GHz
EHF = 30 GHz - 300 GHz