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FCC Site Crushed Under Last Minute Load of Neutrality Comments
by Karl Bode 12:17PM Tuesday Jul 15 2014
As noted yesterday, today is technically the end of the first round of public comments on the FCC's new, controversial network neutrality rules. Unfortunately, it appears that the FCC's aging website couldn't handle the rush of the last minute load of commenters (or, just as probably, it couldn't handle several Reddit threads that have been on the front page the last day).

As the FCC notes in a Tweet embedded below, after the FCC weighs all input and unveils their more-fully crafted new rules (which may or may not do things like cover wireless networks), the agency will field another round of public input in September before the rules get finalized.


The FCC continues to insist your comments will bear equal weight as the input of the Comcast, Google, AT&T and Facebooks of the world, but the proof will of course be in the pudding.

Will the rules cover wireless? Will they continue to contain massive loopholes allowing any number of anti-competitive behaviors provided they're feebly justified under the guise of network capacity and security concerns? Is the agency seriously capable of challenging campaign contributors and reclassifying ISPs as utilities?

Update: It looks like the FCC has extended the filing deadline until Friday:

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camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Equal weight?

>> The FCC continues to insist your comments will bear equal weight as the input of the Comcast, Google, AT&T and Facebooks of the world

The difference is that I cannot offer a job to a FCC commissioner who sits in on the decision, as Comcast apparently did with the Comcast / NBC-Universal merger.

After approving NBC buyout, FCC Commish becomes Comcast lobbyist

n2jtx

join:2001-01-13
Glen Head, NY

1 recommendation

Re: Equal weight?

said by camper:

>> The FCC continues to insist your comments will bear equal weight as the input of the Comcast, Google, AT&T and Facebooks of the world

I saw that and laughed. 10,000,000 peon comments approximately equals one telecom lobbyist comment. The FCC is going to do what it wanted with or without any comments from the public. There will be no surprises when the rules are published.
--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.

IPPlanMan
Holy Cable Modem Batman

join:2000-09-20
Washington, DC
kudos:1

The illusion of input...

Who do think is actually reading this stuff from the average Joe? Nobody.

Selenia
Gentoo Convert
Premium
join:2006-09-22
Fort Smith, AR
kudos:2

Re: The illusion of input...

said by IPPlanMan:

Who do think is actually reading this stuff from the average Joe? Nobody.

It is the same idea as voting. At least you can complain if you do lol. In all seriousness, the trend is to read them then make feeble rules full of loopholes to appear to appease the public, but cater to big money instead. So yes, they read and listen. They simply don't care vs caring about the almighty buck.

Goliath2k
Premium
join:2013-12-28
united state

Re: The illusion of input...

said by Selenia:

It is the same idea as voting. At least you can complain if you do lol.

Yeah that's pretty much the only reason I go to the polls to do my throwaway vote for a third party or write-in.

At least it gives me the right to complain!

FREEfree

@50.182.54.x
said by IPPlanMan:

Who do think is actually reading this stuff from the average Joe? Nobody.

Probably nobody as most of these comments will look like this:
"I like net neutrality. It will mean I get free internet. Regulate the ISPs to give me free internet access"
rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO

1 recommendation

Re: The illusion of input...

Where does this rumor originate? When folks oppose cable mergers, are there similar rumors about folks wanting "free cable"?
Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO
Right because everyone knows and thinks "net neutrality" equals free internet access.

fg8578

join:2009-04-26
Salem, OR
said by IPPlanMan:

Who do think is actually reading this stuff from the average Joe? Nobody.

Do you have any proof for this otherwise unsupported assertion? By law the commission must "consider" all "relevant" comments. To the extent comments consist of spam repeated over and over, then the comments by right should br ignored. But the only way to know is to look at each comment individually, which is exactly what they will do. Don't take my word for it:

Q&A: Will the FCC Read My Net Neutrality Comment?

newview
Ex .. Ex .. Exactly
Premium
join:2001-10-01
Parsonsburg, MD
kudos:1

This is the Reddit post that's been front page

reddit is filing an FCC comment to fight for an Open Internet. We want your voice in it as well
houghe9

join:2008-02-27
Lexington Park, MD

..

"The difference is that I cannot offer a job to a FCC commissioner who sits in on the decision, as Comcast apparently did with the Comcast / NBC-Universal merger."

Not sure if you saw the clip of him claiming "he is not a dingo" if he has a brain in his head and cares anything about this country or his legacy he will do the right thing.

I cant think of one major item a person other than the president or supreme court has to decide on that will affect the future of our nation more than this. yes that sentence was poorly written.

If he goes with the corporations he will be the man the ruined the internet.

batterup
I Can Not Tell A Lie.
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Netcong, NJ

Netflix rallied the troops.

Who votes for "net neutrality?




Dancing cat videos win.
qworster

join:2001-11-25
Bryn Mawr, PA

Cha right!

"The FCC continues to insist your comments will bear equal weight as the input of the Comcast, Google, AT&T and Facebooks of the world...."

Cha right! And if you believe this, then LOOK! Here comes the tooth fairy!

newview
Ex .. Ex .. Exactly
Premium
join:2001-10-01
Parsonsburg, MD
kudos:1
Reviews:
·DIRECTV
·Comcast

The FCC has just extended the comments filing deadline

Click for full size
»twitter.com/GigiBSohnFCC/status/···07070977
Papageno

join:2011-01-26
Portland, OR

2 recommendations

Get ready...

Well, I commented, for what it's worth. Get ready for the cable-packaging of the internet/Web: "I'm sorry, you're not authorized to view that website. For only $35/month* more, you can subscribe to a package which contains it and 100 other fun websites!"

*for the first 6 months, after which standard pricing will apply.

KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK

I stare into the future....

.... and predict all comments will be ignored.

The FCC is firmly under the control of it's Corporate masters. The opinions of mere serfs citizens is irrelevant. Prepare to be assimilated.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini

fg8578

join:2009-04-26
Salem, OR

1 edit

Spam should not get equal weight with considered, fact based comments

If you look at even a fraction of the comments posted so far, it is obvious that many of the one-liners are basically spam comments auto-generated by a script on some "public interest" webpage, devoid of facts, but heavy on emotion and outrage.

The FCC should give such comments no weight whatsoever, even if repeated a million times (which one of these scripts could easily do). The "usual suspects" (not just the ISPs, but PK and EFF) will instead file well-thought out, fact-based comments that the FCC will rely on to make its final decision.

I think the spammers are actually hurting their cause by forcing the FCC staff to review each comment for something useful when instead they will find little of any value on which to base a decision.
OwlSaver
OwlSaver
Premium
join:2005-01-30
Berwyn, PA

1 recommendation

My Comment to the FCC

I request that the FCC regulate the delivery of internet service as a common carrier. My reasons for this are two fold.

-Common carriers are a great way to maximize use of resources and ensure that everyone has far access to the service. With the internet, we as a country should want these to things.

-Vertical integration would be limited or eradicated by this. If the ISPs are also content owners, it makes selection of ISP by a consumer more difficult. These can be addressed though further rules (e.g., requiring equal access). But it is better to not have the situation arise.

Treat them as common carriers, let them make a fair profit, and allow the innovation to occur with all the ways that the facility can be used.