dslreports logo
site
spacer

spacer
 
   
spc
story category
Fairpoint Outlines Broadband Expansion
May use WiMax for select hard to reach locations...
by Karl Bode 08:00AM Wednesday Oct 01 2008
Though Fairpoint has yet to fully take control of the New England networks they acquired from Verizon, they're highlighting their network expansion plans this week in the State of Vermont. According to the Associated Press, the company is promising to deliver broadband to 100% of 51 out of the 99 telephone exchanges in the State by 2010. Fairpoint is also suggesting that some rural areas could be likely targets for WiMax deployment. AT&T is another carrier that's exploring the use of WiMax as a rural broadband alternative. When acquired from Verizon, Fairpoint stated that just 62% of Vermont phone customers could get broadband.

view:
topics flat nest 

knightmb
Everybody Lies

join:2003-12-01
Franklin, TN

Fun with numbers

51 of 99? So what they are saying really is they only will provide broadband to 50% of the total exchanges. It sounds much better than to say "We'll provide 100% coverage, then in small to print, to a few places".

I should use the same statement for myself.

"I provide Tennessee with 100% Wireless Broadband Coverage to 1 out the 347 cities in the state."
--
Fight NebuAD and the like:
Click Here to pollute their data

pnh102
Reptiles Are Cuddly And Pretty
Premium
join:2002-05-02
Mount Airy, MD

Re: Fun with numbers

said by knightmb:

51 of 99? So what they are saying really is they only will provide broadband to 50% of the total exchanges.
It takes a little more than some CO upgrades to provide DSL service to every customer serviced by a particular CO. If there are issues with the wiring (fiber, load coils, bad wiring, etc.) between a CO and a given structure in the service area than that structure will not be able to get DSL.
--
"At the moment of conception."

Mactron
el Camino Real
Premium
join:2001-12-16
CM94sv

Re: Fun with numbers

said by pnh102:

It takes a little more than some CO upgrades to provide DSL service to every customer serviced by a particular CO. If there are issues with the wiring (fiber, load coils, bad wiring, etc.) between a CO and a given structure in the service area than that structure will not be able to get DSL.
True, but without the CO upgrades no one gets anything. Need to start somewhere. We'll see how they do.
--
If only the Verizon CSRs worked this well.

tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting
In the Vermont deal, FairPoint took over 99 telephone exchanges. The 51 exchanges that will see 100 percent coverage within the next two years are located in all 14 counties.
Perhaps I'm being overly optimistic but the way I read that statement is: all customers served by those 51 Central Offices will be able to get DSL by end of 2010.

I can't believe only 48 Vermont Central Offices are currently equipped for DSL. I assume some of these 51 Central Offices support DSL but not remote terminals needed to serve distant customers. But that is just a guess on my part.

/tom

FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

1 edit

AP link to story no good

»money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/art···9fc2.htm
404 Page Not Found
The page you're looking for is not here. We apologize for the inconvenience.

There are several ways you can find the information you need:
Here is a good link to the story:
»www.wcax.com/Global/story.asp?S=···enu183_2

karlmarx

join:2006-09-18
Chicago, IL

But the FCC report says that 88% have access to high speed

Who are we supposed to believe? The FCC says that 88% of Vermont residents already have access to high speed broadband? Where is fairpoint getting this 62% number? Oh, wait, could it be that the FCC is just pulling numbers out of their ass?
--
The happiest countries are the most secular. The struggle AGAINST corporations is the struggle FOR humanity!

tenpin784
I Went To The Dark Side?

join:2001-03-30
Brierfield, AL

1 edit

Re: But the FCC report says that 88% have access to high speed

Or that if ONE person in a zip code has broadband, then the FCC considers the whole zip code to have it?

Duramax08
To The Moon
Premium
join:2008-08-03
San Antonio, TX

Re: But the FCC report says that 88% have access to high speed

Exactly. I know that some people has High speed internet around me and I bet they think we all have some kind of broadband but the truth is that it ends about a mile from me and all the other people on the street.

jsm1234

@optonline.net

why the wimax route may not be so great..

look, im not going to say wireless communications cant be a good alternative for something but we are no longer in the world of just DSL/phone vs cable internet/phone. It is now all or nothing, with triple play or greater, either you offer the best package or you could lose big.

See, here's what I see and feel..
route 1, investment in fiber placed underground..
this is good, even in highly rural areas requiring possibly remote sites, once its in and tested, its just a matter of keeping it up. Since its out of the elements (probably fed thru a tube in the ground), it would be easy to test by simply taking an analysis with test equipment of how far a break is along the line, then going to that point, taping the new fiber to the end of the old and feeding it thru to replace it. My point, anywhere, fiber, if designed right, is the permanent solution. Even in the north of VT, NH & ME where there could be 8 feet of snow on the ground in the winter.

Generally, undisturbed, one way to get the most out of fiber is to set a alarm when it comes close to its threshold for signal quality, this can get you through the winter months.

Ok, this said, fiber delivers.. decades and decades of tomarrow ready network which maintained properly would be able to deliver the best network.

route 2, wireless transmission (for at least broadband anyway).
The problem with wireless is no matter what technology is used, elements often unintended can introduce problems within a network that may barely, if at all, be able to compete with FTTH or cable. All they have to offer is a combo package and this network and its profit could be in turmoil.

Imagine spending a few billion on this network and losing just about all the customers to the competition. Its important to take a long look and see if this is really worth it.

For a perfect example, a few years ago I was enjoying Verizon Wifi, I don't know if it is still around but if one had Verizon DSL, they could also enjoy the wireless connections, this was in NYC. I don't know for sure exactly how it worked, but it was probably, basically, a DSL modem and wireless router on top of select phone booths. I can tell you, right near it, 1/2 block from it, the signal was there, then it wasn't, then it was there again at times. Wireless works great when it works but it doesn't always work that great. The worst thing about wireless is that issues often out of the providers control cause signals to come and go.

There is a major difference between wireless going up against wireless and wireless going up against FTTP or cable.

net work

@sover.net

Vermont

The plan for 100% coverage will never be met by fairpoint alone. The fine print will always be the issue . DSL by its nature can only go so far and the plan to use WiMax to fill the void and go the last mile.The grapevine says the WiMax and DSL will be limited to 1.5 megs.If they are using a wireless backbone to the remote locations and everyone has huge downloads or streaming going on I will hate to see just what that 1.5 meg will go down to. In the future 1.5 meg will be = to todays dialup. I guess band width speed is all in the eye of the beholder. Anyone know who got the 40 mill the VTA has to give out? Will fairpoint get it. If so thats alot of money for only 1.5 meg