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Intel Internet TV Will Launch This Year
Though Content Licensing Remains a 100 Mile High Hurdle
by Karl Bode 04:48PM Tuesday Feb 12 2013
Last December Intel tried to build hype around a supposed Internet TV service by leaking word of it to the press, resulting in a long list of outlets breathlessly insisting that Intel was going to succeed where a long list of tech giants (including Apple, Google and Microsoft) have failed.

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The problem is that traditional TV and broadcast companies don't want disruptive TV options to emerge, and they use restrictive content licenses to ensure it. Sure enough, reports emerged that Intel was running face first into content licensing issues.

Fast forward a few months and Intel is now drumming up hype again, confirming at the AllThingsD Dive Into Media conference today that the platform will launch sometime this year. Intel's Erik Huggers tried to go into great detail about how this platform is going to be different, incorporating a video camera and other features, before falling back to the fact that striking content deals has been a pain in the ass:
quote:
We're working with the entire industry to figure out how to get proper television," Huggers says, pointing out that making the consumer box isn't nearly as difficult as making deals to provide the content. Pressed about whether or not Intel would offer a la carte television channels or bundles of channels, Huggers said that consumers want "choice, control, and convenience," but said that he really did "believe that there is value in bundles." He suggested that Intel would try to do bundles "right," and that "I don't believe that the industry is ready for a la carte."
Again, it's hard to believe Intel's going to be disruptive if they're running into the exact same obstacles that other companies, many of which have better track records on innovation and disruption, are running into. While Intel's promising a revolution, the likely outcome is another mediocre 'me too" offering.

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Kamus

join:2011-01-27
El Paso, TX

meh

Netflix is the only one that seems to have a clue how to do this right.

ITALIAN926

join:2003-08-16
kudos:2

Re: meh

Do what right? How many channels does Netflix have?

.......

crickets

NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06

Re: meh

One for each viewer, with the programming content & schedule customized by the viewer... aka "the right way".
--
"Face piles of trials with smiles; it riles them to believe that you perceive the web they weave."

ITALIAN926

join:2003-08-16
kudos:2

Re: meh

.......Not
Kamus

join:2011-01-27
El Paso, TX
said by ITALIAN926:

Do what right? How many channels does Netflix have?

.......

crickets

Channels... that's so 20th century.

ITALIAN926

join:2003-08-16
kudos:2

Re: meh

Yea well, you go ahead and live in the 22nd century, because what youre dreaming of wont be happening in THIS one.

NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06

Re: meh

57 Channels (And Nothin' On)

The only real difference now--20 years later--loads more channels... but still, nothin' on.
--
"Face piles of trials with smiles; it riles them to believe that you perceive the web they weave."

Bill Neilson
Premium
join:2009-07-08
Arlington, VA
Netflix deserves all of the support that it gets as they did have (and continue having) a very solid amount of content on many devices.

With that said, I have found their content to be extremely light (to me that is) and with more options becoming available during the last few months...ala Amazon Prime Video, HBOGO, etc....I am not sure Netflix has really found the long-term answer yet.
elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink

1 recommendation

Yet another me-too offering

Intel doesn't have any incentive to go against the grain either.

We aren't going to see a successful standalone IPTV/OTT service that carries existing pay-tv content unless Google, Apple, Microsoft and perhaps Amazon get together and buy the content rights - at a minimum of 11 figures annually, to free them from their traditional bounds.

Consumer advocates and bloggers repeatedly fail to understand the very basic economics of ala-carte and streaming pay-tv: it has to bring in greater profits for all the stakeholders, not just a select few, if they are to have reason to offer it.

Lone Wolf
Retired
Premium
join:2001-12-30
USA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Online DSL

Intel Internet TV Will

probably lose money for the company.

Intel is trading at $21.19 today and I expect this number to drop after the failure of their set-top box.

From the news:

DANA POINT, Calif.--Intel Corp. confirmed plans to offer a paid video service delivered over the Internet, which will come along with a new-style set-top box sold to consumers. The chip maker did not disclose the name or pricing for the offering, though it said it will be introduced sometime this year.