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June 6: World IPv6 Launch
Comcast, AT&T and Time Warner Cable On Board
by Karl Bode 08:55AM Wednesday Jan 18 2012 Tipped by FFH See Profile
The time for testing is drawing to a close, as The Internet Society has announced that June 6 will be World IPv6 Launch Day. According to the group, they've gotten major websites (Facebook, Yahoo, Google, Bing), hardware vendors and delivery networks (Cisco, Akamai, Limelight) and three of the four largest ISPs (Comcast, AT&T, Time Warner Cable) to sign off on delivering IPv6 services by that date. "No more 'test flight'… this is the real deal!" insists the group, which notes that the list of cooperating companies is expected to start growing quite quickly. Those interested in keeping tabs as the date grows closer can visit this website.

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timcuth
Braves Fan
Premium
join:2000-09-18
Pelham, AL

1 recommendation

World IPv6 Launch

Yay!

Tim

silentlooker
Premium
join:2009-11-01

Big deal

I do not see majority of company's switching for at least the next 3-5 years. Offering ipv6 is one thing but how many will actually use it.

bbeesley
VIP
join:2003-08-07
Richardson, TX
kudos:5

1 recommendation

Re: Big deal

said by silentlooker:

I do not see majority of company's switching for at least the next 3-5 years. Offering ipv6 is one thing but how many will actually use it.

you could be right, but we won't achieve any momentum until we actually start using it instead of just testing.

At least this is a start that begins the ball rolling to your presumed 3-5 year period..without it, we would still be talking about it 3-5 years from now

whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by silentlooker:

I do not see majority of company's switching for at least the next 3-5 years. Offering ipv6 is one thing but how many will actually use it.

Maybe 1 or 2 percent right off the start. That's still a pretty big number in terms of eyeballs.

Comcast and TWC will have large deployments by then. Also LTE requires IPv6 so both VZW and AT&T have native v6 on their LTE networks.

Enterprises are of course really slow at doing technology upgrades but I think they'll be there in 3 years at the very latest.
Roop

join:2003-11-15
Ottawa, ON
i concur. municipalities around the US for example are so stapped on cash, they cannot even stay ontop of their existing network. rolling out ipv6? it's not going to happen until there's a real need for it.

just exhausting all ipv4s probably won't be that need either, lots of companies own blocks they could recycle/resell. maybe like oil, even though we know we need to get onto something better, we won't until we absolutely have to.

Kommie
Premium
join:2003-05-13
united state
kudos:3
It begins with Microsoft. If MS switches their network to IPV6 the rest will follow.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: Big deal

said by Kommie:

It begins with Microsoft. If MS switches their network to IPV6 the rest will follow.

Microsoft has already been running IPv6 on their internal networks and good portions of their external networks.

Kommie
Premium
join:2003-05-13
united state
kudos:3

Re: Big deal

Not fully though yet.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: Big deal

said by Kommie:

Not fully though yet.

And your point is?

Davesworld

join:2007-10-30
Everett, WA
Reviews:
·Future Nine Corp..
·Callcentric
said by Kommie:

Not fully though yet.

Micro who? This Microsoft you speak about as if they matter, is the name of this company the description of someone's penis?

dahan

join:2000-10-25
Leander, TX

1 recommendation

Why do so many people think that IPv6 involves switching to it? What's gonna happen is that we're going to run IPv6 alongside good old IPv4--not switch from IPv4 to IPv6. Maybe IPv4 will finally disappear from the internet in a decade or something, but that's not a short-term goal.

So, no, I don't think companies will switching to IPv6 in the next 5 years. But I do foresee a lot of companies, large and small, supporting IPv6 over the next year or two. And that's what we're trying to accomplish.

silentlooker
Premium
join:2009-11-01

Re: Big deal

said by dahan:

Why do so many people think that IPv6 involves switching to it? What's gonna happen is that we're going to run IPv6 alongside good old IPv4--not switch from IPv4 to IPv6. Maybe IPv4 will finally disappear from the internet in a decade or something, but that's not a short-term goal.

So, no, I don't think companies will switching to IPv6 in the next 5 years. But I do foresee a lot of companies, large and small, supporting IPv6 over the next year or two. And that's what we're trying to accomplish.

Because in order to have no problem surfing using ipv6 you would need a router that supports it. Basically it's not just switching a switch at isp and all is good.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

1 recommendation

Re: Big deal

said by silentlooker:

Because in order to have no problem surfing using ipv6 you would need a router that supports it. Basically it's not just switching a switch at isp and all is good.

You don't need a router with v6 anymore than you don't need a router for v4. But even that is a lame ass excuse. Every current router from D-Link/Linksys/Netgear and Apple support it and most of them are not even really all that new either.

AuraReturn
Premium
join:2003-08-18
USA
said by dahan:

Why do so many people think that IPv6 involves switching to it? What's gonna happen is that we're going to run IPv6 alongside good old IPv4--not switch from IPv4 to IPv6. Maybe IPv4 will finally disappear from the internet in a decade or something, but that's not a short-term goal.

So, no, I don't think companies will switching to IPv6 in the next 5 years. But I do foresee a lot of companies, large and small, supporting IPv6 over the next year or two. And that's what we're trying to accomplish.

I'm not familiar with this topic but how can IPv4 run alongside 6?
--
Ask me about my sites:
bay area jobs Dogs for adoption coupons NBA: »nbaintelligence.com

Davesworld

join:2007-10-30
Everett, WA
Reviews:
·Future Nine Corp..
·Callcentric

1 recommendation

Re: Big deal

said by AuraReturn:

said by dahan:

Why do so many people think that IPv6 involves switching to it? What's gonna happen is that we're going to run IPv6 alongside good old IPv4--not switch from IPv4 to IPv6. Maybe IPv4 will finally disappear from the internet in a decade or something, but that's not a short-term goal.

So, no, I don't think companies will switching to IPv6 in the next 5 years. But I do foresee a lot of companies, large and small, supporting IPv6 over the next year or two. And that's what we're trying to accomplish.

I'm not familiar with this topic but how can IPv4 run alongside 6?

It's a separate stack. Even if you run Windows XP, chances are that you are running both stacks and have been for years so it isn't whether or not it can, it already does. The v6 version likely has nowhere to go but it is there. Most Linux distributions by default run both stacks out of the box. In any case, if your IPV6 stack can't find an IPV6 router it ignores that and is somewhat dormant.

Dahan is correct, we'll definitely use IPV6 more and more but likely will never retire IPV4 but rather it's usage will be very small.

mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:10

lol, yeah right

Sorry, but of the ISPs listed, only Comcast will actually have this deployed to end users within the next 3 years. Sure, AT&T and TWC will have their backbone supporting it, and it may even be available to their huge corporate customers upon request, but end users will not be seeing it any time soon. They just like blowing smoke to get some publicity and give the illusion they're actually keeping up with tech and not trying to play catch-up.

/M

deepakc

@pvusd.net

Re: lol, yeah right

Actually, as far as AT&T is concerned, their backbone has already supported IPv6 for some time, and they offer IPv6 services to enterprise customers. As far as home users/small business, they've been planning on deploying an update to their residential services this year (See here: »www.att.com/esupport/ipv6.jsp#fb···lLlMnkIg)

Might want to fact-check before you spread false information.

HarleyYac
Lee
Premium
join:2001-10-13
Allendale, NJ
kudos:2

deadline

I forget is there a "deadline" that needs to be met?
If not, I doubt most on the list will be up to snuff anytime soon.
--
My opinion on religion and science? Science builds airplanes. Religion flies them into buildings.
jbjetta
Premium
join:2004-07-23
Manassas, VA

1 recommendation

Easy thing to sign on with for these guys.

Pretty much every major backbone carrier has IPv6 enabled, I have not run into one in the past year that has not been able to offer a dual stacked internet connection. As for Facebook, Google, Cisco, and many of he sites, they all have AAAA records for their main web sites today. So you can resolve an IPv6 path to their main pages, though all of their links generally lack a AAAA record so you end up back on IPv4 when you actually browse the site.

So its very easy to say, yeap we offer IPv6 by June 6th. I want to see when comcast, TWC, fios, etc work with the router vendors to offer it to my home in a secure fashion (since IPv6 is pretty much at the level of IPv4 in the early 90s when it comes to what to do about security.)
doofoo

join:2002-01-21
Upper Marlboro, MD

Maybe Comcast will actually deliver IPv6 to business class

customers..

Nah.. Probably not. I'll believe this when I see it.

Hasn't been much progress that I've seen publicly - Not even beta testing of the static ipv6 for business customers yet.

What's the deal here Comcast?
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

1 recommendation

Re: Maybe Comcast will actually deliver IPv6 to business class

said by doofoo:

customers..

Nah.. Probably not. I'll believe this when I see it.

Hasn't been much progress that I've seen publicly - Not even beta testing of the static ipv6 for business customers yet.

What's the deal here Comcast?

Every time this comes up its stated by Comcast that if you're interested in this moving forward to express interest to your Comcast sales rep. The consumer side of the cable customers expressed more interest in this (over 6k customers) service so they started on that site first. Cox for example started with their business cable customers first.
doofoo

join:2002-01-21
Upper Marlboro, MD

1 recommendation

Re: Maybe Comcast will actually deliver IPv6 to business class

Of course they have more interest from consumers than businesses. I am running my business. I don't have time to call comcast and complain about not having IPv6.

I was just assuming that since consumers are asking for IPv6, they would give business customers IPv6 as well since some of those businesses will be serving IPv6 sites to their IPv6 consumer customers.

It's just retarded.. So they say they are going live on June 6th... But they are going to shaft their highest paying customers.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

1 recommendation

Re: Maybe Comcast will actually deliver IPv6 to business class

said by doofoo:

Of course they have more interest from consumers than businesses. I am running my business. I don't have time to call comcast and complain about not having IPv6.

I was just assuming that since consumers are asking for IPv6, they would give business customers IPv6 as well since some of those businesses will be serving IPv6 sites to their IPv6 consumer customers.

It's just retarded.. So they say they are going live on June 6th... But they are going to shaft their highest paying customers.

The second phase of their production rollout will be with connections using a router and subnet of some size. Until they've done thorough testing and validation they probably don't want to roll it out to business customers because then the business customers would bitch and complain it isn't tested enough.

It sucks but you're also the smallest segment of customers on their cable network. If most business customers were like you not caring then why would they target business customers first when the consumers in large numbers are requesting it and business are not?

whiteshp

join:2002-03-05
Xenia, OH

Dynamic IPv6

For those who know a little about IPv6 there is a massive amount of addresses that in theory would allow everyone to have many addresses.

However resource shortages are a big money maker for ISPs. They switch to IPv6 and I would not be surprised to see us getting 1 dynamic IPv6 address so statics can be sold for a premium.
cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8

1 recommendation

Re: Dynamic IPv6

IPv6 has no concept of NAT, so they cannot do that. And RIRs will look upon those that try with scorn. (eg. hint at taking away their allocations, and refuse to give them any more.) A single /64 is the smallest they could provide without breaking things.
mrdon213

join:2010-08-20
Hobbs, NM

Re: Dynamic IPv6

Actually the smallest allocation for a end site is a /48. There has been a push to make it a smaller /56 for end sites.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: Dynamic IPv6

said by mrdon213:

Actually the smallest allocation for a end site is a /48. There has been a push to make it a smaller /56 for end sites.

That hasn't been true for quite some time even before RFC6177 was published. The minimum recommended allocation is a /64 although a larger allocation of /60 or even /56 will be more common.
cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8
That may be true for allocations from a regional registry, but there are no such "laws" requiring ISPs hand out such large blocks to customers -- esp. residential customers. A /64 is the smallest block they can give a network without breaking a basic part of IPv6 (SLAAC -- StateLess Address AutoConfiguration.) [as stupid as it is, millions of people will be (are) using it.]

The Comcast testing has had a great deal of debate. While a /60 (16 /64 networks) would be more than enough for all but the most complex "home" network, hardware routing isn't nibble aligned. So /56 (256 /64's) will likely be the path for those who need more than one LAN.

Handing out /48's to every grandmother with a DSL line is such a horrific mismanagement of space, in a few years we'd be back in the same boat we're trying to get out of today. A /48 is 65536 /64 networks. I could assign a /64 to every ethernet port in my house and still not use 0.1% of that much space -- and I'm counting every switch port, broken crap, stuff I've not used in years (and likely never will), and a lot of stuff that will never have IPv6 capability. Further, a /48 minimum would only increase the available internet by a factor of 65,536 (2^16); given how quickly we're using IPv4, the inherent inefficiencies of networking, and the pervasive it's-so-huge-we'll-never-use-it-up attitude, we'll need to have IPv6++ in committee in about 2 years.

zammyzam

@comcast.net
said by cramer:

IPv6 has no concept of NAT, so they cannot do that. And RIRs will look upon those that try with scorn. (eg. hint at taking away their allocations, and refuse to give them any more.) A single /64 is the smallest they could provide without breaking things.

Comcast is testing IPv6 to a limited market right now, and they are only providing 1 IPv6 address to begin with (/128), and only allowing customers within that market if they are using a preferred OS(Win 7/OSX 10.7) attached directly to the cable modem(no routers).
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

2 recommendations

Re: Dynamic IPv6

said by zammyzam :

Comcast is testing IPv6 to a limited market right now, and they are only providing 1 IPv6 address to begin with (/128), and only allowing customers within that market if they are using a preferred OS(Win 7/OSX 10.7) attached directly to the cable modem(no routers).

Yes, they've made it pretty clear they'll be doing testing in multiple phases. The first phase is directly connected systems; as in no router. They have a preferred OS list because of the need for a DHCPv6 client and the listed OS's are the only OS's they "support" and which have DHCPv6 support. Any other OS with a DHCPv6 client not on the list would work fine as well. The second phase will be for users with a router and one or more systems behind it.
sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10

1 recommendation

Common Verizon

What's the holdup here? I know you support IPv6 for your backbone and government customers, but how about enabling for the rest of us?

chefjoe

@comcast.net

Does that mean cable modems will enable IPv6 at Comcast ?

Just did a check of my Motorola SB6120 cable modem I use with comcast (and has their special firmware beamed into it from headquarters).

MDD IP Mode Override (MIMO) IPv4 Only
Modem's IP Mode IPv4 Only

And yet I'm to believe Comcast will be supporting IPv6 on most of their networks in 6 months. I'll believe that when True2Way cablecards/devices are back on the market and AllVid is more than a pipe dream.
»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tru2way